Please, pronounce it "wert"!

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TheMadKing

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Reads like you've arrived with a preconceived idea therefore unable to get past what you consider an 'origin' and 'Germanic'. Again, it's a very loose term coughed up for the sake of convenience when offering pretences we know. Me on the hand, I call it bollocks when it's clearly bollocks.
All the words he highlighted are direct old English words and therefore classed in the defined family of Germanic languages. Old English words are still very common in modern english. If you refuse to acknowledge that the field of linguistics has defined a "germanic language family" that's on you, and the world's experts disagree. While the many germanic tribes were indeed genetically diverse, their languages shared enough similarities to group them together and set them apart from latin and its romantic derivatives. If you go back far enough, germanic languages and romance languages share a common root in proto-indo-european along with sanskrit and greek.

Also the Vikings conquered the northern half of England and actually had English kings, see Cnut the Great. So they were far from unsuccessful in their campaigns

if you want to learn more than you ever cared to, I recommend the History of the English Language podcast. It is a very detailed examination of the evidence and grouping of these languages and their connections and divergences.
 
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OP
S

slayer021175666

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Then you'll need to start spelling it correctly: 'trube' as in lube, cube, tube and boob. Or just call it 'trub' as in rub, tub, spud and Captain Pugwash.

Trub IS the correct spelling. Maybe I'm just not getting what you meant or something.
 

NickTheGreat

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I'm a pretty pedantic fellow, but I did not know this. I'll add it to my list!
 

McMullan

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All the words he highlighted are direct old English words and therefore classed in the defined family of Germanic languages. Old English words are still very common in modern english. If you refuse to acknowledge that the field of linguistics has defined a "germanic language family" that's on you, and the world's experts disagree. While the many germanic tribes were indeed genetically diverse, their languages shared enough similarities to group them together and set them apart from latin and its romantic derivatives. If you go back far enough, germanic languages and romance languages share a common root in proto-indo-european along with sanskrit and greek.

Also the Vikings conquered the northern half of England and actually had English kings, see Cnut the Great. So they were far from unsuccessful in their campaigns

if you want to learn more than you ever cared to, I recommend the History of the English Language podcast. It is a very detailed examination of the evidence and grouping of these languages and their connections and divergences.
Where did Cnut rule from, exactly? I'd suggest many of your believes in history were conjured up mainly in the 19th century, propagated by 'romantics', misrepresented further by Hollywood and now appear on YouTube as 'facts'. The Vikings no more conquered Northern Britain than they did Iceland. There was very little to conquer in those days and he still claimed to rule offshore, pissing his pants. The Norse influence in the North and along the east coast of England is mainly due to Norse refugees settling after fleeing orcs you celebrate as 'Vikings'. You might want to ask the Icelanders about their history, as they were among the few literate Norse to document it. On that subject, let's not pretend literacy levels were much that far back. Language was mainly a spoken form of communication. Fact is, again, 'Germanic' is conjured up for convenience to offer fake order and sometimes even wild claims. The low levels of literacy/documented history has allowed an awful lot of BS to occupy some people's beliefs. Bollocks mainly.
 
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TheMadKing

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Where did Cnut rule from, exactly? I'd suggest many of your believes in history were conjured up mainly in the 19th century, propagated by 'romantics', misrepresented further by Hollywood and now appear on YouTube as 'facts'. The Vikings no more conquered Northern Britain than they did Iceland. There was very little to conquer in those days and he still claimed to rule offshore, pissing his pants. The Norse influence in the North and along the east coast of England is mainly due to Norse refugees settling after fleeing orcs you celebrate as 'Vikings'.
Many of my "beliefs" in history are founded in research based on primary sources and the fact that I minored in it in college. Ever heard of the Danelaw? The Great Heathen Army? these are all historical facts recorded in the Anglo Saxon Chronical and backed up by archaeological evidence. I don't watch youtube, and you sir may want to go back and review some histories


"As a Danish prince, Cnut won the throne of England in 1016 in the wake of centuries of Viking activity in northwestern Europe. His later accession to the Danish throne in 1018 brought the crowns of England and Denmark together. Cnut sought to keep this power-base by uniting Danes and English under cultural bonds of wealth and custom, as well as through sheer brutality. After a decade of conflict with opponents in Scandinavia, Cnut claimed the crown of Norway in Trondheim in 1028. The Swedish city Sigtuna was held by Cnut (he had coins struck there that called him king, but there is no narrative record of his occupation).[3] In 1031, Malcolm II of Scotland also submitted to him, though Anglo-Norse influence over Scotland was weak and ultimately did not last by the time of Cnut's death.[4][5]"

On an island near Deerhurst, Cnut and Edmund, who had been wounded, met to negotiate terms of peace. It was agreed that all of England north of the Thames was to be the domain of the Danish prince, while all to the south was kept by the English king, along with London. Accession to the reign of the entire realm was set to pass to Cnut upon Edmund's death. Edmund died on 30 November, within weeks of the arrangement. Some sources claim Edmund was murdered, although the circumstances of his death are unknown.[37] The West Saxons now accepted Cnut as king of all of England,[38] and he was crowned by Lyfing, Archbishop of Canterbury, in London in 1017.[39]


 

cmac62

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Webster's has decided that whatever is on common use is correct. Like they think it's okay to pronounce turmeric "too mur ik", conveniently ignoring the first R.

I've tried linking a YouTube video of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers singing Let's Call The Whole Thing Off, but for some reason the forum doesn't like the URL. Big black box is all it shows. Oh well.
I'll try


It worked. :mug:
 

MaxStout

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Americans are notorious for bastardizing "foreign" names. A few geographical examples that come to mind:

New Prague, MN - "noo Prayg"
El Dorado, KS - "el-doh-RAY-do"
Buena Vista County, IA - "BYOO-nuh-VIHS-tuh"
Cairo, IL - "CAY-row"
Madrid, IA - "MAD-rid"

I once overheard a patron in a restaurant asking the waiter about "shiht-tayke" mushrooms mentioned on the menu. Too funny. :p
 

McMullan

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Many of my "beliefs" in history are founded in research based on primary sources and the fact that I minored in it in college. Ever heard of the Danelaw? The Great Heathen Army? these are all historical facts recorded in the Anglo Saxon Chronical and backed up by archaeological evidence. I don't watch youtube, and you sir may want to go back and review some histories


"As a Danish prince, Cnut won the throne of England in 1016 in the wake of centuries of Viking activity in northwestern Europe. His later accession to the Danish throne in 1018 brought the crowns of England and Denmark together. Cnut sought to keep this power-base by uniting Danes and English under cultural bonds of wealth and custom, as well as through sheer brutality. After a decade of conflict with opponents in Scandinavia, Cnut claimed the crown of Norway in Trondheim in 1028. The Swedish city Sigtuna was held by Cnut (he had coins struck there that called him king, but there is no narrative record of his occupation).[3] In 1031, Malcolm II of Scotland also submitted to him, though Anglo-Norse influence over Scotland was weak and ultimately did not last by the time of Cnut's death.[4][5]"

On an island near Deerhurst, Cnut and Edmund, who had been wounded, met to negotiate terms of peace. It was agreed that all of England north of the Thames was to be the domain of the Danish prince, while all to the south was kept by the English king, along with London. Accession to the reign of the entire realm was set to pass to Cnut upon Edmund's death. Edmund died on 30 November, within weeks of the arrangement. Some sources claim Edmund was murdered, although the circumstances of his death are unknown.[37] The West Saxons now accepted Cnut as king of all of England,[38] and he was crowned by Lyfing, Archbishop of Canterbury, in London in 1017.[39]


According to excitable historians with very colourful imaginations almost a thousand years later? Remind me what happened to his 'power-base'? Once the peaceful and unarmed folk of Britain organised themselves into a resistance they kicked arse and the Vikings either got tossed into shallow graves or sailed away pissing their pants. Viking era over.
 

Drewch

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Etymology is fun stuff, especially when looking at such a mongrel language as English.
To paraphrase someone whose name escapes me just now, English doesn't just borrow words; English pursues other languages down alleys to beat them unconscious and rifle through their pockets for loose vocabulary.
 

Golddiggie

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Considering how different parts of the country, hell, even within the same region of the country (such as inside New England) people pronounce words differently, the OP has zero chance of his wish happening. Hell, there are people that grew up in the same city that talk very differently (Boston for one).
 

davidabcd

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If you can understand what someone means when they speak or write (purpose of grammar), that's pretty much all you should expect.
Going around and correcting others will make you many, many friends and very popular. /s
Mispronunciations or different pronunciations of a word in a specific field (brewing in this case) borne from lack of info or wide agreement, just isn't important enough to squabble over. It would only become an important issue when understanding fails.
Accents aside, general vocabulary words are pronounced the same by everyone so that should be sufficient.
 

cmac62

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If you can understand what someone means when they speak or write (purpose of grammar), that's pretty much all you should expect.
Going around and correcting others will make you many, many friends and very popular. /s
Mispronunciations or different pronunciations of a word in a specific field (brewing in this case) borne from lack of info or wide agreement, just isn't important enough to squabble over. It would only become an important issue when understanding fails.
Accents aside, general vocabulary words are pronounced the same by everyone so that should be sufficient.
Like the word "the" unless your are an alum of Ohio St. LOL :mug:
 

dmtaylor

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Many of my "beliefs" in history are founded in research based on primary sources and the fact that I minored in it in college. Ever heard of the Danelaw? The Great Heathen Army? these are all historical facts recorded in the Anglo Saxon Chronical and backed up by archaeological evidence. I don't watch youtube, and you sir may want to go back and review some histories


"As a Danish prince, Cnut won the throne of England in 1016 in the wake of centuries of Viking activity in northwestern Europe. His later accession to the Danish throne in 1018 brought the crowns of England and Denmark together. Cnut sought to keep this power-base by uniting Danes and English under cultural bonds of wealth and custom, as well as through sheer brutality. After a decade of conflict with opponents in Scandinavia, Cnut claimed the crown of Norway in Trondheim in 1028. The Swedish city Sigtuna was held by Cnut (he had coins struck there that called him king, but there is no narrative record of his occupation).[3] In 1031, Malcolm II of Scotland also submitted to him, though Anglo-Norse influence over Scotland was weak and ultimately did not last by the time of Cnut's death.[4][5]"

On an island near Deerhurst, Cnut and Edmund, who had been wounded, met to negotiate terms of peace. It was agreed that all of England north of the Thames was to be the domain of the Danish prince, while all to the south was kept by the English king, along with London. Accession to the reign of the entire realm was set to pass to Cnut upon Edmund's death. Edmund died on 30 November, within weeks of the arrangement. Some sources claim Edmund was murdered, although the circumstances of his death are unknown.[37] The West Saxons now accepted Cnut as king of all of England,[38] and he was crowned by Lyfing, Archbishop of Canterbury, in London in 1017.[39]


Wow, now we're talking about this guy?!


Sorry, I can't help it, Genesis is my favorite band. :)
 

TheMadKing

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According to excitable historians with very colourful imaginations almost a thousand years later? Remind me what happened to his 'power-base'? Once the peaceful and unarmed folk of Britain organised themselves into a resistance they kicked arse and the Vikings either got tossed into shallow graves or sailed away pissing their pants. Viking era over.

I see, please enlighten me then! Where did you uncover all this information about the history of Britain that was missed by all the scholars of the world? Have you found and translated another version of the anglo saxon chronical perhaps?

I am indeed anxious to learn from you how you've uncovered this true history which throws down the combine scholarship of the world's leading experts and refutes beyond a doubt the written historical record of the time, the archeological record, the linguistic analyses, and the genetic record which have been accepted as historical fact by every reputable institution in the world. I'm dying to know!
 

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