Please, pronounce it "wert"!

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slayer021175666

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Watching Youtube videos. Going to the LHBS. Going to the local breweries. All over, I am hearing people who should know better pronouncing the word wort like the word wart. I was taught to say it "wert" not, "wort". Just thought I'd throw it out there.
 

TheMadKing

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Watching Youtube videos. Going to the LHBS. Going to the local breweries. All over, I am hearing people who should know better pronouncing the word wort like the word wart. I was taught to say it "wert" not, "wort". Just thought I'd throw it out there.
I'm guilty, I know it's wert, and it's a German word but I still say wort sometimes because that's how that spelling would be pronounced in English.

Krausen is also pronounced croy-zen not craow-zen
 

McMullan

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It's pronounced 'wert', as in word, work and Worzel Gummidge. Some people obviously weren't sure and guessed it was pronounced 'wart'. They refuse to accept they're wrong. They're utterance deniers. Some have even attempted to argue, quite brazenly, there's a choice, but the only choice is pronouncing it correctly or pronouncing incorrectly.

 

madscientist451

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And people should not say BMW. It's actually Bayerische Motorwerke.
No, its actually Big Waste of Money.
But what's the point of working if you can't waste your money?
1638441539169.png

But back to wart or wort, people frequently "murder the King's English", but when you point it out you'll just be labeled as a know-it-all dick.
So maybe its best to ignore the barbarians that can't speak properly and just have a homebrew.
:cask:
 

McMullan

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Yet English is primarily a Germanic language, which are different from the Romantic languages derived from Latin. We who speak English share a lot of roots with the German language.
Sorry, but that's very misleading. Most English words actually have Latin roots. Of course, there are some similarities among Germanic languages, but they actually evolved as separate languages barring the odd invasion. 'Germanic' is a very loose concept for tribes of Northern Europe. Genetically, it's surprising how distinct some Germanic tribes are in reality. The main Germanic influence in Britain appears to be from the Belgae, the first Germanic tribe to colonise the British Isles. Then there were the Saxons. Then Norse refugees fleeing Vikings. The Vikings got there arses kicked mainly and never made much headway inland in Britain beyond hiding on the east coast like girls, but don't tell them that. And, of course, let's not forget the Celts, who got there before the Belgae, some time after the last ice age and continue to laugh at all the angry Germanic invaders.
 
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Drewch

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Most English words actually have Latin roots.
Depends on how you count them. In any given passage of English text, the preponderance of words will be Germanic because most of the core "function" words in English are Germanic. Yes, if you tally the words in a dictionary, a lot of them are Latin or Greek in origin, but that doesn't necessarily translate directly into everyday usage.

Edit: English is the bastard child of old low German and old Norse who was sent to a French prep school.
 
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McMullan

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Depends on how you count them. In any given passage of English text, the preponderance of words will be Germanic because most of the core "function" words in English are Germanic. Yes, if you tally the words in a dictionary, a lot of them are Latin or Greek in origin, but that doesn't necessarily translate directly into everyday usage.
Old English, which is mainly what you're referring to, in my mind, was a bit limited. Apart from useful swear words, it got replaced mainly.

 

DBhomebrew

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Etymology is fun stuff, especially when looking at such a mongrel language as English.

I like our very common phenomenon of redundant word pairs such as law and order. A Latin word with a Germanic word that mean nearly the same thing.

The Queen's English may largely be Latin, but the alewife's is Germanic.
 
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McMullan

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No, I mean normal English as used today. For example, all the words in bold are Germanic in origin. The bones of English are Germanic.
Reads like you've arrived with a preconceived idea therefore unable to get past what you consider an 'origin' and 'Germanic'. Again, it's a very loose term coughed up for the sake of convenience when offering pretences we know. Me on the hand, I call it bollocks when it's clearly bollocks.
 

Andres Falconer

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Ah, if I had a penny for every time words of foreign origin are murdered in the US. Starting with the names of states. My favorite is seeing how wound up locals get about the “correct” way to mispronounce Nevada.

Also, pronounce it any way you want, but don’t spell it “wert”, as I increasingly see in other forums.
 

Drewch

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Reads like you've arrived with a preconceived idea therefore unable to get passed what you consider an 'origin' and 'Germanic'. Again, it's a very loose term cough up for the sake of convenience when offering pretences we know. Me on the hand, I call it bollocks when it's clearly bollocks.
When I say Germanic in origin, I mean "descended from vocabulary in the languages spoken by the people groups we now refer to as Germanic," as opposed to being derived from, say, Latin (or one of Latin's modern descendants). Most of the words we use every day are the ones that come from those old Germanic languages. Pick any passage of (non-academic) English prose, look up the etymology of the words in it, and most of the time, most of the words will be from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European family rather than the Italic branch.

But we are clearly at an impasse and talking past each other, and we're off-topic from the OP. So, we must agree to disagree and move on.
 

Craiginthecorn

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Webster's says both are right.
Webster's has decided that whatever is on common use is correct. Like they think it's okay to pronounce turmeric "too mur ik", conveniently ignoring the first R.

I've tried linking a YouTube video of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers singing Let's Call The Whole Thing Off, but for some reason the forum doesn't like the URL. Big black box is all it shows. Oh well.
 
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Drewch

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Watching Youtube videos. Going to the LHBS. Going to the local breweries. All over, I am hearing people who should know better pronouncing the word wort like the word wart. I was taught to say it "wert" not, "wort". Just thought I'd throw it out there.
Woort was the pronunciation that first occurred to me when I saw it written, but I try to use wert now if for no other reason than woort is homophonous with wart (in my idiolect of English), and who wants to drink fermented wart?
 
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McMullan

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When I say Germanic in origin, I mean "descended from vocabulary in the languages spoken by the people groups we now refer to as Germanic," as opposed to being derived from, say, Latin (or one of Latin's modern descendants). Most of the words we use every day are the ones that come from those old Germanic languages. Pick any passage of (non-academic) English prose, look up the etymology of the words in it, and most of the time, most of the words will be from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European family rather than the Italic branch.

But we are clearly at an impasse and talking past each other, and we're off-topic from the OP. So, we must agree to disagree and move on.
You do know that linguistics is a rough social 'science' and that comparisons are mainly untestable hypotheses with directionality pretty much impossible to determine, don't you? I just can't help but view as a load of bollocks mainly 😱
 

Dland

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this thread hasn't covered vorlauf, or spunding yet? i'm dissapointed....lol...not that i'm dissin', or self appointed?
Just between you & me, I sometimes write "recirc" (as in recirculate) in my beer log instead of vorlauf. Have no idea how to say it correctly, but that is OK, I don't really have anyone to talk to about brewing, in person anyway. How is one 'spose to pronounce spunding?
 

DBhomebrew

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Here's a fun one -- the body of the Barley Crusher malt mill is made of aluminum, with cold rolled steel rollers. And...

Aluminum only contains one "i".
The suffix comes from '-ium'

Etymology, good stuff. Bollocks, or not.
 

Drewch

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Just between you & me, I sometimes write "recirc" (as in recirculate) in my beer log instead of vorlauf. Have no idea how to say it correctly, but that is OK, I don't really have anyone to talk to about brewing, in person anyway. How is one 'spose to pronounce spunding?
There's no brewing commandant that says Thou shalt use German brewing jargon.
 
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The German word for 'word' is wort.
Refer to your worterbuch (word book; vocabulary text) to read lesestück (reading piece; lesson) eins.

The German word for wort, Würtze, means flavoring, seasoning, etc. according to context. Can also mean flavorful, gewürztraminer, flavorful traminer wine.
 
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