Pink Moscato

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brottman

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I'm planning on picking up a Cali white Moscato pail soon. Can anyone point me in the right direction to make a pink Moscato?
 

Yooper

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Not really, except if you're picking up a pail of white moscato, how do you plan on turning that into a pink moscato? Are you buying grape skins somewhere? If so, that would work but I don't know how pink it would be in the end.
 

DoctorCAD

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Food coloring??? No, really, there is no way to make a white grape juice a pink (rose) juice without the skins. See the quoted method I found on the web.

"Vatting or Pressing. At this step in the process, the rosé producer chooses between two vinification options: direct pressing, which yields a pale pink wine, or maceration/bleeding, which yields a darker-colored pink wine.

Direct Pressing. This technique, which is used by the majority of Provence producers, yields a rosé that's light in color, because the dark skins stay in contact with the clear juice for a very short period of time. In direct pressing, the grapes – either destemmed or in clusters – are immediately pressed in a wine press (pressoir) to release the juice. The pale pink juice is then delivered to the fermentation tank.

or
Maceration and bleeding. This is a steeping-and-draining process. During maceration, the crushed grapes soak in a tank for between two and 20 hours at a cool, tightly controlled temperature (usually ranging from 60° to 68°F). As the juice and skins comingle, the skins release their pigments and delicate aromas. The winemaker tests for color and, determining that the maceration period is complete, opens a filter in the bottom of the vat to drain – or bleed – the juice into the fermentation tank using the force of gravity. Exactly how long the vatting time should last is one of the questions that make rosé winemaking so delicate. It must be long enough for the red pigments to give the wine its pink color. But it mustn't be so long that the tannins in the skins begin to detract from the wine's lively elegance."
 

pumpkinman2012

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A local winery adds a tiny amount of Cab Franc to make their Catawba Rose, keep it simple.
 

Mr_fleabite

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You can add red wine concentrate, in VERY small volumes (a few milliliters); you'll need to dilute it just to add it to your ferment. Another option would be to add a red varietal something low in tannins. Alternately you can pray to find Pinot Gris grapes this late in harvest and let them sit on their skins for a bit; however at this point even if you could find them the PH/ Acid levels would be all out of whack. You could experiment post ferment with food dye, but I've never done that and know nothing about it in wine (odor, aging, color fast, interactions, sterility, etc.).
IMHO Concentrate is your best bet, but I'd try several different bench top trials before adding it to the ferment even then you may want to wait until post ferment.
 

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