PH Test strips

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Grinder12000

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
2,996
Reaction score
50
Location
Columbus WI
I picked up so PH test strips meant for beer. I wanted to test the water I used.

problem - The colors go from 4.6 to 6.2 and the color was THIS but a little brighter purple.

Does not match anything even close to the charts. They did not have a wider range set that I was hoping for.

In your opinion is this OVER 6.2 (like 10 or something). And if so what can I add to my brew to get it in a range (and what range should it be?)
 

Yooper

Ale's What Cures You!
Staff member
Admin
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
74,923
Reaction score
12,809
Location
UP/Snowbird in Florida
Well, pure water has a ph of 7. Sometimes, all you have to do is add your grain to the water, and the acidity of the grains bring the mash ph down to the right range. You could check it then, to see where you are. Checking the ph of the water is meaningless, since it's the ph of the mash that is important.
 

jkarp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
2,089
Reaction score
53
Location
Elizabeth, CO
Five Star Buffer 5.2. Your LHBS will have it. It keeps the mash at a 5.2 pH.
 

Yooper

Ale's What Cures You!
Staff member
Admin
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
74,923
Reaction score
12,809
Location
UP/Snowbird in Florida
Oddly that means absolutely nothing to me.
Haha- he's referring to a product called "5.2 stabilizer" or something like that. We all tend to have a jar of it tucked away. I use it in every mash, because I have alkaline water and I never did get a water report. What it does is stabilize the mash ph at 5.2, no matter what the actual water ph is. I have no idea how it works, and I've only checked my mash ph once while using it (and it was a bit over 5.2, but was hard to read since it was a darker beer). I still use it, thinking that it can't hurt, might help.

It does stabilize the ph, but doesn't correct things like residual alkalinity and correct for too much bicarbonates that can cause some off-flavors.
 

Chriso

Broken Robot Brewing Co.
Joined
Oct 31, 2007
Messages
4,619
Reaction score
88
Location
Someplace
... that depends on your water report. For some of us yes, for some of us no.

For example, my water is a bit hard, and makes an excellent British beer with no alteration. If I'm doing a pale ale, I use Campden to knock out the chloramines, and PH 5.2 to stabilize the mash and sparge water.
 

flyangler18

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
5,557
Reaction score
44
Location
Hanover, PA
For example, my water is a bit hard, and makes an excellent British beer with no alteration. If I'm doing a pale ale, I use Campden to knock out the chloramines, and PH 5.2 to stabilize the mash and sparge water.
Yep, I do the same thing here! :D
 

Bills Brew

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2006
Messages
128
Reaction score
2
try a swimming pool test kit. It is a titration type, but works pretty good. you can also get an idea on the alkalinity - also a titration.
 

Bigsnake

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Messages
364
Reaction score
0
Location
Baton Rouge, LA
All you can really judge from the tests strips is that if it's darker than the highest color, then it's a higher pH than that one. If you really want to know, grab a wine pH test kit. Or take a water sample to a pool supply store. Calling the might actually get an answer as well.

Where I live the water is a nice 8.39 pH. I really don't know what else is in the water here so I just use bottled water when I brew.
 

BrewBeemer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2006
Messages
3,492
Reaction score
28
Location
native islander my paradise
My city water has chlormine in it, kills tropical fish must be good for humans and your bier also? Next to the Koi pond is a well with 7.15-7.17 Ph water that tastes good and is perfect for the Koi's health plus the same temp as their pond. I'll brew with well water city for the dishwasher.
 
Top