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juskojj

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Ok all you beer makers and mead makers. Anyone have a PH meter? Suggestions on brand/model? are they really needed?
 
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juskojj

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Mead Makers - does anyone use a PH meter? if so why and suggestions on brand/model?
 

Rev2010

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I have the Milwaukee pH 56. NorthernBrewer sells it for $99 but I got it on Amazon for only $57: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007Z4HZ8O/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20 . Works great so far. Are pH meters really needed? Not really, you'll still be making beer with or without one. I've been brewing great beer for nearly 4 years without one and only recently picked one up to improve my beers further. I also think after a number of uses over a number of different styles of beer I'll probably get used to the ballpark ranges and know enough to not really need to use it each session, just to check in once in awhile I would imagine. The only thing is you have to remember to calibrate it before using on each brew day and you have to store it in electrode storage solution. For me this is as simple as putting some storage solution in the end cap, capping it, and putting a piece of tape around the seam just to aid in preventing any evaporation between uses, then store it standing upright.


Rev.
 
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ABVIBUSRM

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I have the Milwaukee pH 56. NorthernBrewer sells it for $99 but I got it on Amazon for only $57. Works great so far. Are pH meters really needed? Not really, you'll still be making beer with or without one. I've been brewing great beer for nearly 4 years without one and only recently picked one up to improve my beers further. I also think after a number of uses over a number of different styles of beer I'll probably get used to the ballpark ranges and know enough to not really need to use it each session, just to check in once in awhile I would imagine. The only thing is you have to remember to calibrate it before using on each brew day and you have to store it in electrode storage solution. For me this is as simple as putting some storage solution in the end cap, capping it, and putting a piece of tape around the seam just to aid in preventing any evaporation between uses, then store it standing upright.


Rev.
They are needed if you want to take a accurate ph reading
 

Rev2010

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hahaha no i did not mean that to be a smart a$$ rather if you want a accurate reading use a meter vs the strips
Haha, I know, was just joking (like the commercials) hence the smiley's ;) I figured his question was more of whether it's imperative to have one for brewing / mead making. I never made mead so I can't say if it's a necessity for that, but being people have been making mead for centuries without ph meters I'd guess that it's not absolutely necessary there either.


Rev.
 

ABVIBUSRM

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Haha, I know, was just joking (like the commercials) hence the smiley's ;) I figured his question was more of whether it's imperative to have one for brewing / mead making. I never made mead so I can't say if it's a necessity for that, but being people have been making mead for centuries without ph meters I'd guess that it's not absolutely necessary there either.


Rev.
oh absolutly not need for making beer..i agree with you
 

mabrungard

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I'm very suspicious of meters with the probe built into the unit. Units like the Hanna Checker, Hach Pocketpro, or Milwaukee pH56 meters have not inspired confidence in their reliability or longevity to me. I prefer units that have a separate pH probe with a corded BNC connection to the meter. Probes like this are typically cylindrical and have relatively small diameter which can easily fit in a small sample container like a shot glass. That means that less sample is needed to submerge the probe and less sample to cool off before testing. With a BNC connector, you can find a replacement pH probe from a huge selection of sources. That helps keep their pricing competitive. The Milwaukee 101 and 102 meters meet my goals. There are plenty of other manufacturers that also produce similar meters with separate probes.
 

z-bob

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It looks like the biggest difference between the Milwaukee 101 and 102 meters is the 102 comes with (and can use) a temperature probe. The probe accounts for the difference in price.

I can see where that might be worth $20 or so. My eyes ain't what they used to be for reading a glass thermometer...
 

Spartan1979

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I've had a Milwaukee 101 for about three years now and I'm satisfied with it. I recently changed the probe for the first time. 2-1/2 years for a probe is supposedly pretty good.
 
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