PH Meter Recommendations?

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ultravista

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Looking for feedback/recommendations on a reliable digit PH meter. I would like to stay under $50 if possible.

TIA.
 

bschot

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I've got a Milwaukee and it is fantastic. Whatever meter you decide to get check the price of replacement probes, some replacements are about as expensive as a new meter.
 
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LarMoeCur

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Looking for feedback/recommendations on a reliable digit PH meter. I would like to stay under $50 if possible.
If you run a search you will find there are no recommended ones for under $50. For a recommended one that is stable your looking at more than $100.

Hach Pocket Pro+ #9532000
Milwaukee MW102
Hanna 98128 (Calibration issues according to AJ)
Omega PHH7011
 

Drk93TT

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Just purchased a MW102 at 109$ .. not concerned with the extra cost if its easy to calibrate and quick to take accurate readings. You can buy a 8$ PH reader on eBay.. and i know theres a thread here comparing one of the cheapies to a high end model somewhere.. to lazy to link it.
 

LarMoeCur

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Your better off spending 8 bucks on a pound of hops. Use the Bru'nwater spreadsheet and your margin of error will be just about the same as that 8 dollar meter. I still use Bru'nwater with my meter and it within .5 everytime.
 

Drk93TT

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Your better off spending 8 bucks on a pound of hops. Use the Bru'nwater spreadsheet and your margin of error will be just about the same as that 8 dollar meter. I still use Bru'nwater with my meter and it within .5 everytime.
Yeah Ive been using BruNwater for some time now, curious to check it real time w my meter. . . Wish I could brew more... avg 1 5.5 gal batch a month lol.
 

brick_haus

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I have the Hach Pocket Pro Plus and Milwaukee M102. Hach is much faster and more stable in my opinion.
 

augiedoggy

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I have both of these as well as the older yellow cheaper ph meter...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Digital-PH-...hash=item4890b57f5b:m:mcL5zj_4EyW2Esb-k9pIKZw
been using them all for a couple years... the red one Ive had for around 2 years and theyellow Ive hade for like 3 years... I use one to check the calibration of the other every now and then and crecalibrate them when they read off from one another...
If your looking for someing to just tell you your in the range of 5.2 than these do work perfect for me... My brewing buddy bought a hanna recently and both times we have compared them they have been consistent with each other in readings so... The TDS meter works well too... Its amazing the difference in disolved solids between tap water and RO water which is close to 0
 
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ultravista

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I brew only a few times a year and occasionally ferment a batch of peppers for hot sauce - I need something that will see 4-5 uses a year.
 

FranklinNewhart

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Looking for feedback/recommendations on a reliable digit PH meter. I would like to stay under $50 if possible.

TIA.
I have a couple of these from off E-Bay. one with lighted display and one without. I have never had a problem with either one.

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Portable-Dig...439403?hash=item1c6b7d03eb:g:xe4AAOSwtnpXmcdE

You might also consider having a TDS meter I have one of these as well and it is dependable also.

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/LCD-Digital-...8?hash=item5d67ab1bb8:g:wJoAAOSw6n5XrUR9:fro:
 

okiedog

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mtnagel

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Your better off spending 8 bucks on a pound of hops. Use the Bru'nwater spreadsheet and your margin of error will be just about the same as that 8 dollar meter. I still use Bru'nwater with my meter and it within .5 everytime.
0.5 is a huge difference from predicted. Of the 40 times I've measured pH after using Brun Water, the worst was 0.23 units higher than predicted while the average difference is 0.06 units. Did you mean 0.05?
 

augiedoggy

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I have a couple of these from off E-Bay. one with lighted display and one without. I have never had a problem with either one.

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Portable-Dig...439403?hash=item1c6b7d03eb:g:xe4AAOSwtnpXmcdE

You might also consider having a TDS meter I have one of these as well and it is dependable also.

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/LCD-Digital-...8?hash=item5d67ab1bb8:g:wJoAAOSw6n5XrUR9:fro:
I have the same TDS meter as well as an older yellow non lit ph meter it came with that I bought like 3 years ago and a newer red backlite one with the 0.01resolution display.

all mine still work well
 
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Morrey

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I bought a $15 meter off Amazon and it worked fine...for about a month.

Then I figured ph was a very important value to me as I brew lots of sour beers and need to monitor the ph precisely as the wort goes down in ph. Thusly, I spent $125 for the Hach Pocket Pro + and never looked back.

Conversely, if I was a BCM type of brewer, I'd trust Bru'n Water and forget the whole meter subject. In summary, get a decent $100 meter if this is important to you.
 

LarMoeCur

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0.5 is a huge difference from predicted. Of the 40 times I've measured pH after using Brun Water, the worst was 0.23 units higher than predicted while the average difference is 0.06 units. Did you mean 0.05?
Good catch...Fat fingered typo! I did indeed me .05 :tank:


Thank you!
 

JimmyC-BYOB

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I put some RO water in the cap before I reinstall it for storage. it holds very little.
@augiedoggy - Please don't use RO water for storage. RO water does not have enough ionic strength and can poison the reference of your sensor causing an offset. You can calibrate the offset out but the more you do it the more you take away from the accuracy.

Ideally, you want to use KCL (same as in the fill solution) but if you don't have any you are better off just using plain tap water.

Just an FYI.
 

JimmyC-BYOB

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Those cheap meters are worthless. Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the pH glass but the electronics. A pH meter is only as good as the electronics and the temperature compensation algorithm.
Go to eBay and buy a good brand name lab meter (Mettler-Toledo, Orion, Hach just to name a few). You can get them for a fraction of what they go for retail and have an incredibly accurate measurement. The pH sensor is the disposable part but if you take care of them they can last for ever. Get a refillable with a temp element internal to it. For about $100 you can get something worth a $1000 and will last you for the rest of your brewing career. If you need some help choosing (I work in the industry of lab and online analytics) I would be happy to help. Just IM me.
 

augiedoggy

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I bought a $15 meter off Amazon and it worked fine...for about a month.

Then I figured ph was a very important value to me as I brew lots of sour beers and need to monitor the ph precisely as the wort goes down in ph. Thusly, I spent $125 for the Hach Pocket Pro + and never looked back.

Conversely, if I was a BCM type of brewer, I'd trust Bru'n Water and forget the whole meter subject. In summary, get a decent $100 meter if this is important to you.
So lets look at this from a rational point of view. Your cheap meter broke but worked fine while it was working... From the amount of others like myself that have been using our for years without a problem vs those who actually gave the cheap meter a chance and had it fail, it really seems your results arent typical yet you advocate everyone forgo the $10-15 option and spend 10 times more on another meter because of the slight possibility it could fail when in reality he could just spend $20 on 2 cheap meters in the unlikely event that his fails like your did and still come out ahead right? I have read of 2 accounts where these cheap meters both supposedly "crapped out" and only in one case did someone actually explain how and that he did bother to check the batteries... I believe many buy them with the expectation of failure and so when something simple like dead batteries or the unit needing calibration happens they throw it away and buy what they think will be something easier to use and maintain only to find in some cases that the probes can still fail on the expensive meters and care still needs to be taken to maintain them like soaking or storing in a solution or water...

In any case the OP stated he wasnt looking for lab quality accuracy since he would only use it a handful of times per year..
I know little about brewing sours and im sure the specific ph comes into play a lot more often than when brewing a non lambic style which apparently you view as "BMC" beers although most others in this forum would disagree with you. so more percise or robust ph meter may be the better choice for you but it doesnt mean the cheap meters failing is a typical outcome and as you say it worked fine for the first month so that would support that they do in fact work despite the assumptions by many that they just cant possibly work because of cost vs what they bought theirs for.
 

LarMoeCur

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I bought a $15 meter off Amazon and it worked fine...for about a month.

Then I figured ph was a very important value to me as I brew lots of sour beers and need to monitor the ph precisely as the wort goes down in ph. Thusly, I spent $125 for the Hach Pocket Pro + and never looked back.

Conversely, if I was a BCM type of brewer, I'd trust Bru'n Water and forget the whole meter subject. In summary, get a decent $100 meter if this is important to you.
If you put in the time to do a quick google search, you will find that this is the number one complaint on these cheap meters. Some users get years of use, some get 10 days. Read the Amazon reviews 60% say worked fine for BLANK days then craped out. The other 30% say DOA. The other 10% 5 stars best 10 bucks ever spent. It's a crap shoot.

There are hundreds of post on HBT some get very detailed with information from people who use meter everyday at their jobs. Some of these people have done testing on all sorts of meters and posted the data on HBT. You can spend hours reading these post or just trust that some of us have. The bottom line is if you want a meter that is accurate, stable, and will last. It's going to cost you just over 100 bucks. If you don't want to spend the money buy pH strips or use Bru'nwater or the other 10 spread sheets that calculate pH. The accuracy of these spread sheets is well documented and will get you not only in the ballpark but pretty damn good seats.
 

augiedoggy

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@augiedoggy - Please don't use RO water for storage. RO water does not have enough ionic strength and can poison the reference of your sensor causing an offset. You can calibrate the offset out but the more you do it the more you take away from the accuracy.

Ideally, you want to use KCL (same as in the fill solution) but if you don't have any you are better off just using plain tap water.

Just an FYI.
This is good to know but so far my meter has held calibration pretty well. I should point out that I usually use some water from my HLT which is honestly usually an RO and tap water mix thats sat out overnight with a camden tablet disolved in it so that may be why I havent had an issue. You say these are garbage and dont work yet I have referenced mine against another more expensive meter and another cheap meter and mine in fact DO work well for what I use them for.... Again we are arguing apples to oranges. this is not a LAB enviroment.. We have folks here brewing good beer without them and in aluminum kettles with tap water in some cases, Do you really think the majority of home brewers will ever actually appreciate any real benefit from a lab quality ph meter if they are just using it to check mash and sparge ph?
 

augiedoggy

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If you put in the time to do a quick google search, you will find that this is the number one complaint on these cheap meters. Some users get years of use, some get 10 days. Read the Amazon reviews 60% say worked fine for BLANK days then craped out. The other 30% say DOA. The other 10% 5 stars best 10 bucks ever spent. It's a crap shoot.

There are hundreds of post on HBT some get very detailed with information from people who use meter everyday at their jobs. Some of these people have done testing on all sorts of meters and posted the data on HBT. You can spend hours reading these post or just trust that some of us have. The bottom line is if you want a meter that is accurate, stable, and will last. It's going to cost you just over 100 bucks. If you don't want to spend the money buy pH strips or use Bru'nwater or the other 10 spread sheets that calculate pH. The accuracy of these spread sheets is well documented and will get you not only in the ballpark but pretty damn good seats.
The problem with those reviews is they are by folks who have no idea how to use a ph meter this is their first one and many likely wont bother reading the directions with such a minimal investment. Both good and bad reviews there should be taken with a grain of salt unless further info is given by the person leaving the review. This is why a forum like this is a better place for those to actually get more detailed info about whether these are a good buy or not... Be honest with yourself, you have developed your opinion and likely wont change it regardless of whether you have any actual first hand knowledge of the subject like others here right? Especially if you already purchased another meter.

So far we have how many who use them without issues and how many how really gave them a shot only to find that it broke after a month of working good? 4 with good experiences and 1 without.

Why does the OP need to spend <$100 for a meter that "will last" theres a good chance he may use it a couple times and realize its not really doing him much good either way and stoop using it. Ive seen a number of people here clam they no longer bother using a ph meter or strips and instead rely on things like brun water or acid malt or 5.2 stabilizer... I think $12 is a worthwhile investment for some to make and if they feel its so important to them that they need to spend much more thats great... But the point here is these meters work well for many home brewers.

A couple years ago people here were very discouraged against using a chinese heating element vs a camco or american made brand. They were widely touted and thought of as dangerous, unreliable and not to be considered.. Yet now the vendors here all sell them and they outnumber the camco element sales 2 to 1 here ... Does the camco element have a better track record as far as less failures and better performance, yes. But they also come at about twice the cost (for the stainless based ones) and for many the minimal risk is worth it. Case in point the original 4500w camco element I had put out 4460w of heat but thebase rusted, so I later replaced it with a chinese 4500w element I paid more for through the electric brewery website that only put out 4050w or so but the base doesnt rust... It was all about compromise vs what would work well for me at the time. Ive since upgraded again not because I had to but because I could justify the advantages of a different element to myself... It doesnt make the old elements junk. I actually paid less for my new chinese based TC elements than any of the previous ones and they work better with more flexibility so its not always about cost.
 

brew703

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I've been using the yellow Dr.meter 0.01 High Accuracy Pocket Size pH Tester for a few years now. No complaints so far. It has .01 accuracy, calibrates easily, and it came with the blue TDS Tester when I bought it. Cheap, accurate, and, if it breaks, it's no biggie to order another one.
This is the one I have as well. Could not justify spending $100 for a ph meter. I also use Bru N Water and the recommended PH is close when checked with the Dr Meter so I am satisfied. And if it breaks then no real loss.
 
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Morrey

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I apologize for creating a firestorm. To me, and for the type of brewing I do, Ph is critically important. This leads me to needing the most accurate and most reliable meter I can find for a reasonable value. Say I am kettle souring a Gose and each hour that goes by the ph is dropping until the magic moment when I halt souring and begin the boil. This is a very small ph zone and .1 ph is critical in the final outcome. I'd rather have the confidence that a decent meter is in my hand since I can't just run to any store and buy another cheap meter if mine fritzes on a Sunday when I am watching the ph drop like a rock.

Conversely, if I was a brewer who stayed mainstream with somewhat standard beers (apologize for the BCM comment), I would trust Martin Brungard's program and simply add what the program told me. In this regard, I suppose any meter would do since there is no real critical nature of the use as in my case. OR no meter at all is ok here, simply trust Martin.

I suppose it is a simple matter of not only how you want to invest your brewing dollars, but also the type of beers that you are targeting, as in my case, are ph dependent. As a matter of fact, a buddy asked me about meters as he wanted to try Gose brewing. I suggested he try a $15 meter to see if he wanted to continue with sour brewing. I honestly see all the various points being made here. All good.
 

augiedoggy

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I apologize for creating a firestorm. To me, and for the type of brewing I do, Ph is critically important. This leads me to needing the most accurate and most reliable meter I can find for a reasonable value. Say I am kettle souring a Gose and each hour that goes by the ph is dropping until the magic moment when I halt souring and begin the boil. This is a very small ph zone and .1 ph is critical in the final outcome. I'd rather have the confidence that a decent meter is in my hand since I can't just run to any store and buy another cheap meter if mine fritzes on a Sunday when I am watching the ph drop like a rock.

Conversely, if I was a brewer who stayed mainstream with somewhat standard beers (apologize for the BCM comment), I would trust Martin Brungard's program and simply add what the program told me. In this regard, I suppose any meter would do since there is no real critical nature of the use as in my case. OR no meter at all is ok here, simply trust Martin.

I suppose it is a simple matter of not only how you want to invest your brewing dollars, but also the type of beers that you are targeting, as in my case, are ph dependent. As a matter of fact, a buddy asked me about meters as he wanted to try Gose brewing. I suggested he try a $15 meter to see if he wanted to continue with sour brewing. I honestly see all the various points being made here. All good.
Thank you! I honestly appreciate the point your trying to make as well. I only jumped in with all of this because these points are usually shot down and lost with all the negative assumptions before people can get honest real feedback either way.
 

LarMoeCur

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The problem with those reviews is they are by folks who have no idea how to use a ph meter this is their first one and many likely wont bother reading the directions with such a minimal investment. Both good and bad reviews there should be taken with a grain of salt unless further info is given by the person leaving the review. This is why a forum like this is a better place for those to actually get more detailed info about whether these are a good buy or not... Be honest with yourself, you have developed your opinion and likely wont change it regardless of whether you have any actual first hand knowledge of the subject like others here right? Especially if you already purchased another meter.
I should have followed those reviews! But instead I read about people here using cheap meters and believed I would be the 1 in 4 that got a good meter. I've read many of your own threads championing these cheap meters. My opinion was developed at the cost of my wallet. I have three low cost meters collecting dust. One worked for 3 brews, the other worked for about 6 months, the other still works but is off by at least .6 if not more. It will not hold calibration no mater what I do.

So far we have how many who use them without issues and how many how really gave them a shot only to find that it broke after a month of working good? 4 with good experiences and 1 without.
I gave them a shot three times. I wasted $50 plus dollars living the dream. Sorry to say but the old saying is true. You get what you pay for.

Why does the OP need to spend <$100 for a meter that "will last" theres a good chance he may use it a couple times and realize its not really doing him much good either way and stoop using it. Ive seen a number of people here clam they no longer bother using a ph meter or strips and instead rely on things like brun water or acid malt or 5.2 stabilizer... I think $12 is a worthwhile investment for some to make and if they feel its so important to them that they need to spend much more thats great... But the point here is these meters work well for many home brewers..
I now own 4 meters. And I'm trying to prevent the OP from making the same mistake that a lot of people on HBT and other forums have made. Like I said, I've spent hours reading post on pH meters. There is an overwhelming number of cheap meter post that talk about how they break or do not work correctly. So in your opinion these meters work well. In my opinion. You should count yourself lucky. I believe you beat the odds. I have three, I guess you would call me unlucky. The reviews, the post, my own experiences indicate these meters are junk. Should he spend the 100 on a meter? No. Should he spend 12 on a meter? Same answer no. Buy a pound of hops or have your water tested. Use a spread sheet it's free. I still use Bru'nwater even with a high dollar meter. It's pretty damn accurate!

There's a reason why Harbor Freight sells a volt meter for $3.99 and Fluke sells them for them for $100. There are no short cuts with scientific equipment like this. There's a reason why labs don't use 12 dollar meters. Call your local Brewery and ask them what meter they use if they even use one. I have and not one of them would bet 15 barrels of beer on a 12 dollar meter. So, why bet 5 gallons?
 

Morrey

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Well, for and against arguments have been presented, now the OP has to weigh the importance the meter's value will be to him.

For standard beers, the $15 meter may work just fine and last many uses. If it fails you didn't invest unnecessarily. Water management programs take most of the guesswork from your own measurements anyway.

For more serious ph related brewing measurements, the OP may elect to spend a bit more.

BUT, if the OP doesn't really have a specific goal in mind other than a ph meter would be neat to try, the $100 route may very well be an overkill.

Now its up to the OP.
 

Sadu

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My $6 meter broke when I donged it against the side of a glass while shaking off the drips. I was sooooo glad that I was using a cheap meter because a good meter would have done the same thing. Until that point I got 20 or so brews out of it and it served its purpose very well. Guess I beat the odds too.
If the replacement dies prematurely I will probably revert to just trusting brunwater which is fine for the sort of stuff I brew.
 

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I should have followed those reviews! But instead I read about people here using cheap meters and believed I would be the 1 in 4 that got a good meter. I've read many of your own threads championing these cheap meters. My opinion was developed at the cost of my wallet. I have three low cost meters collecting dust. One worked for 3 brews, the other worked for about 6 months, the other still works but is off by at least .6 if not more. It will not hold calibration no mater what I do.



I gave them a shot three times. I wasted $50 plus dollars living the dream. Sorry to say but the old saying is true. You get what you pay for.



I now own 4 meters. And I'm trying to prevent the OP from making the same mistake that a lot of people on HBT and other forums have made. Like I said, I've spent hours reading post on pH meters. There is an overwhelming number of cheap meter post that talk about how they break or do not work correctly. So in your opinion these meters work well. In my opinion. You should count yourself lucky. I believe you beat the odds. I have three, I guess you would call me unlucky. The reviews, the post, my own experiences indicate these meters are junk. Should he spend the 100 on a meter? No. Should he spend 12 on a meter? Same answer no. Buy a pound of hops or have your water tested. Use a spread sheet it's free. I still use Bru'nwater even with a high dollar meter. It's pretty damn accurate!

There's a reason why Harbor Freight sells a volt meter for $3.99 and Fluke sells them for them for $100. There are no short cuts with scientific equipment like this. There's a reason why labs don't use 12 dollar meters. Call your local Brewery and ask them what meter they use if they even use one. I have and not one of them would bet 15 barrels of beer on a 12 dollar meter. So, why bet 5 gallons?
You mean me and the other 5 users who chimed in already should "count ourselves lucky" right?
The fact that you had such failures with three of these in a row does raise other questions from an analytical point of view as far as their being another possible factor here.

I own no less than 5 fluke multimeters myself 4 of them being very expensive models. and bunch cheap $5 harbor freight volt meters they often give away free...First off they are not the same at all with the fluke having many more functions. And it would be silly for joe home owner to go out and buy a $300 fluke just to check the voltage of a couple of unmarked wires he found in his wall or see which plug is on what unmarked breaker and then maybe use it once or twice more in his lifetime right? Or are you saying the cheap HF meter wont tell you if you have 120v or nothing on those wires? Come on man!

I find for something simple like checking voltage the cheap meters read the same as my flukes and again they each have their place where they make more sense... If im working on a $700,000 printer then yeah I use the fluke in my bag. But it im checking the voltage on a car battery or testing an alternator then I use the cheap HF meter I leave in the toolbox of my truck because it honestly works just as well and I wont be out an expensive meter if it goes missing. Same with leaving one at my cabin for checking voltage on an outlet. Again the point it your comparing apples to oranges with professional lab use vs checking sparge water while making beer at home.

lets compare some other things where your analogy doesnt ring true like many of the auto computer scanners you find at the auto store that only have simple diagnostic and code reseting functions for $200 to something like a cheap ELM327 bluetooth OBDII scanner which does everything and soo much more for $12 and a pc or smartphone with the free torque app?
NO you dont always get what you pay for. Sometimes being an educated consumer and not shopping based on marketing, brand names and price alone can really benefit a person. once in a while I like to make a smoothy but that doesnt mean I needed to spend $500 on a top of the line blender to do it either... now if I owned a restaurant well I might...

I can brew cheap no name beer at home for like what 50 cents a bottle and popular name brand craft beers are more like $5 a bottle at the store.... surely that means all name brand mass produced professionally brewed beer is better right? Because you always get what you pay for right? Afterall the branding indicates its from germany or ireland, even though the truth is it may be contract brewed at the old pabst brewery by Miller like a Guinness blond (oh wait that ones brewed in the rolling rock brewery in latrobe.) or have nothing to do with the brand on the bottle like the Stella hard apple cider thats made by Bud in NY and not even available in Belgium .. If you believe and assume what they all want you to, you would be a very gullible person. But also a model consumer. And this is why companies like inbev can get away with buying and suceed with owning companies like northern brewer and midwest supplies who many still believe are competing companies even though that hasnt been true for years. In short that one size fits all phrase just isnt true these days.
 

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The enormously expensive lab I brought my water to for initial testing recommended the Oakton pH meter, and also suggested I get at least seven buffers. I think the buffers are liquids used to calibrate the probe.
 

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I apologize for creating a firestorm. To me, and for the type of brewing I do, Ph is critically important. This leads me to needing the most accurate and most reliable meter I can find for a reasonable value. Say I am kettle souring a Gose and each hour that goes by the ph is dropping until the magic moment when I halt souring and begin the boil. This is a very small ph zone and .1 ph is critical in the final outcome. I'd rather have the confidence that a decent meter is in my hand since I can't just run to any store and buy another cheap meter if mine fritzes on a Sunday when I am watching the ph drop like a rock.

Conversely, if I was a brewer who stayed mainstream with somewhat standard beers (apologize for the BCM comment), I would trust Martin Brungard's program and simply add what the program told me. In this regard, I suppose any meter would do since there is no real critical nature of the use as in my case. OR no meter at all is ok here, simply trust Martin.

I suppose it is a simple matter of not only how you want to invest your brewing dollars, but also the type of beers that you are targeting, as in my case, are ph dependent. As a matter of fact, a buddy asked me about meters as he wanted to try Gose brewing. I suggested he try a $15 meter to see if he wanted to continue with sour brewing. I honestly see all the various points being made here. All good.
Well here is my final suggestion on this forum. Take and buy one two or a bunch of cheap ones and one of the hundred dollar ones. Now you have three to compare. Now next get yourself a number of Ph solutions of different values and a jug of distilled water. You can buy these solutions already made up or you can use a measured amount of distilled water and the dry packet of Ph solution mix. Wash all your probes really well in the distilled water. Make sure all your batteries are brand new from the store. Throw away the ones that came with the meter. They are not up to snuff. Get good batteries. Now follow the instruction very closely in how to use a Ph meter. Clean the probe in Distilled water. Calibrate the unit with at least three Ph Solutions High, Low, and Mid. Then take your measurments. When you are finished, again clean your probes and dry before putting you Ph meter away. And do not forget to turn it off. If you need accuracy then learn how to do accuracy in a professional laboratory manner.
 

k1ngl1ves

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I have the Hach Pocket Pro Plus and Milwaukee M102. Hach is much faster and more stable in my opinion.
^^^^ I hear this often from friends.^^^^

I absolutely love my mw102! With that said, I'd probably buy the Hach if I had to do it all over again. I just hear too much good stuff about it. I'm very happy with my 102 though, and have absolutely no complaints. Worth every penny.

:mug:
 
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