Pellicule in my sour kettle??

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Pdaigle

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Did a kettle sour for the first time. Boiled it for 20 min before pitching lactobacillus plantarum and kept it at 100F for 2 days. When I opened the kettle I noticed a pellicule and some people ask me if there's was brett and no. I taste like a sour and no taste of brett. Is the pellicule normal in a sour kettle?

Cheers,
 

kingmatt

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I have only done a handful of kettle sours but have never had a pellicle form. I think it has to do with oxygen exposure but someone who is more versed on sours can speak to that. Regardless, I think your beer will be fine either way.
 

jjw5015

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Has the gravity changed? If there's only bacteria present, the gravity shouldn't change. If there's wild yeast, then it's a different story. Matt is right about oxygen. It's best to purge the headspace with c02 prior to sealing.
 

Gnomebrewer

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Lactobacillus can form a pellicle - 2 days seems quick though. As said, it's to do with oxygen in the headspace.
 

brownni5

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Was it a pellicle or a krausen? Without a pic, we'll never know... My guess is no pellicle. Also no way you'd be able to taste Brett character after 2 days if it even was there, especially I there was no other primary fermenter.

Also, why do people want to make souring with L. plantarum so damned difficult? Pitch it at room temp or warmer, walk away for 24-36 hours!
 

Gnomebrewer

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Also, why do people want to make souring with L. plantarum so damned difficult? Pitch it at room temp or warmer, walk away for 24-36 hours!
Even easier - co-pitch with Saccharomyces and leave for the entire ferment period (no need to re-boil).
 

Gnomebrewer

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Keeping out O2 (using CO2 or plastic wrap etc.) is more of an issue when using grain for souring - it slows down some of the other nasties like enteric bacteria.
 

RPh_Guy

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No, a pellicle is not normal.
Lactobacillus rarely (if ever) forms a pellicle. None of the commonly used strains/species form a pellicle, regardless of oxygen exposure.

Your batch had a contamination from wild yeast and/or bacteria.

Check the specific gravity to make sure it hasn't significantly fermented.
If it hasn't, and there's no terrible odors, it's fine to continue as normal with the kettle souring process.

I advocate a co-souring process, which is much less risky than kettle souring.
 
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Pdaigle

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Was it a pellicle or a krausen? Without a pic, we'll never know... My guess is no pellicle. Also no way you'd be able to taste Brett character after 2 days if it even was there, especially I there was no other primary fermenter.

Also, why do people want to make souring with L. plantarum so damned difficult? Pitch it at room temp or warmer, walk away for 24-36 hours!
no k
Was it a pellicle or a krausen? Without a pic, we'll never know... My guess is no pellicle. Also no way you'd be able to taste Brett character after 2 days if it even was there, especially I there was no other primary fermenter.

Also, why do people want to make souring with L. plantarum so damned difficult? Pitch it at room temp or warmer, walk away for 24-36 hours!
NO Krausen, just pellicles. I might be the O2 but I heard it didn't not matter base on new research from what I heard. I did a half batch so I had alot of headspace so maybe more Co2 next time and I will add a plastic wrap. thx
 

shortyz

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contamination from something else, either your vessel or the pitch you used.

i find you have to be incredible careful on how you treat a kettle sour after it drops below boiling temps, the air has all sorts of things that are interested in eating those sugars. where did u get the plantarum? if its wyeast throw that sht in the garbage, it always has yeast in it.

ive used swansons plantarum alot and id say every 5th sour i make somehow gets some baddies in it, when i see this i boil it and accept the sourness i got for the time it sat.

cheers
 

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