Pasteurizing infected beer

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

rafaelpinto

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
246
Reaction score
6
Hey guys, Ive got an imperial oatmeal stout infected. Its not bad, but I really cant enjoy it. So I want to experiment with it.

I was thinking about pasteurizing it, then getting it back to a fermentation bucket, adding new yeast and coccoa nibs.

Anyway, here is the real question: alcohol boiling temperature is around 173F. Can I just open all the bottles, pour them on the kettle, warm it up to around 160F for 30 minutes, cool it, remove it to the fermentation bucket and add coccoa/new yeast?

Will that kill all the bugs? I guess it would work, but there is the pressure point... pasteurization isnt done with temperature only.
 

dcp27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2010
Messages
4,126
Reaction score
134
Location
Medford
while pastuerizing may kill the infection, its not going to revert it back into a normal stout. you'd just be preventing the infection from going further, so you'd just be taking the same beer & adding cocoa to it. doesn't seem like that'd be enough of a fix to me if you don't enjoy it as is
 

pdietert

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
309
Reaction score
31
Location
Houston
The yeast will not do anything without some form of sugar to eat. Also, unless you are going to add some kind of sugar, you are going to oxidize the heck out of it.
 

khawk95

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
145
Reaction score
24
The yeast will not do anything without some form of sugar to eat. Also, unless you are going to add some kind of sugar, you are going to oxidize the heck out of it.


Agreed. I would not recommend trying to add new yeast. If it is infected and bottled, you may have bottle bombs. Get them chilled down or put them in a cooler to protect yourself. I would either force yourself to drink them or use them for cooking.


Roed Haus Brewery
 

Qhrumphf

Stay Rude, Stay Rebel, Stay SHARP
HBT Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2011
Messages
16,947
Reaction score
6,938
Location
Arlington (DC)
If it's between messing with it an dumping it, I see no reason not to mess with it. But, as indicated above, pasteurizing may knock out the infection, but it won't fix any off flavor the infection created, and if you don't like it now you probably never will. Additionally, pouring bottles into the kettle will add a bunch of oxygen. If you boil it again, perhaps that may drive off the oxygen before any damage happens, but I don't know how quickly those reactions take place, so it may be too late and you may get cardboard. Plus if you boil again then you're going to drive off alcohol, plus other stuff.

So point is, there's no reason not to mess with it, but don't expect it to fix anything.
 
OP
OP
R

rafaelpinto

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
246
Reaction score
6
Like you said, I have been keeping the beer cooled to prevent the infection to going further. It will never age, bottle condition and get better...

The true problem seems to be the oxidation. What if I really boil it, evaporating all alcohol, adding new yeast and brown sugar? Will that take the oxygen out?
 

Qhrumphf

Stay Rude, Stay Rebel, Stay SHARP
HBT Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2011
Messages
16,947
Reaction score
6,938
Location
Arlington (DC)
If you're going to go to the level of reboiling, adding new fermentables, and adding new yeast, with all the problems that it will more than likely cause, your best bet is to dump the batch and just start over. Will save you time, if nothing else, and probably save you money too.

If it were me, I'd start experimenting out of curiosity. I certainly wouldn't dump any additional money into it and wouldn't expect a good result, since there's like a 95% chance that instead of making it taste better, you're going to make it worse.

Here's what I would do: Search the forum for "bottle pasteurization". There's some threads usually having to do with backsweetening mead or cider. But try pasteurizing it in the bottle. That should stabilize em for the time being.

Then take a few bottles and leave em in the sunlight for a few days/weeks. Take a few more, and constantly cycle them back and forth between like 100 degrees and 35 degrees for a couple weeks. Take another bottle, pour it into a glass, stick it somewhere out of the way, and just let it sit.

Basically, I'd take the chance to force some major off-flavors into these beers just as a learning experience. Or just dump em.
 
Top