Partial Mash Idea

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sbelongie

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I had an idea as I was thinking about doing my next batch. I can't do All grain like I want because I don't have a big enough pot yet so I am still limited to the partial Mash. I am going to be making a strong Scotch Ale. In the book it gives me all three ways of making the beer. For the Partial Mash it says to mash 1.75 lbs of 2 row pale malt and to subtract 2 lbs of dry extract. I was thinking what if I would double the pale malt could I subtract 4 lbs of the extract?

It was just idea I had I thought if I was going though all of the trouble of mashing I might as well use more base.

Thanks in advance!
 

McGarnigle

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You can do that, using more grains and less extract. I do wonder about 1.75 lbs. 2-row = 2 lbs DME. I don't know if I'm missing something, but that's wrong.
 

Grizzlybrew

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I think you have your math wrong - or somebody does. If you are mashing 1.75 lbs of 2-row, you would subtract only ONE lbs of DME.

But for the rest of your question - yes, you could mash 3 1/2 lbs of 2-row and subtract TWO lbs of DME.

Keep in mind, that a partial mash is different than a specialty grain steep. You need to ba able to hold the temp constant (i.e. 152-154) for at least an hour (typically) for conversion to take place.
 

mrk305

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I think you have your math wrong - or somebody does. If you are mashing 1.75 lbs of 2-row, you would subtract only ONE lbs of DME.

But for the rest of your question - yes, you could mash 3 1/2 lbs of 2-row and subtract TWO lbs of DME.

Keep in mind, that a partial mash is different than a specialty grain steep. You need to ba able to hold the temp constant (i.e. 152-154) for at least an hour (typically) for conversion to take place.
I used to do that in a preheated oven. It actually worked pretty good.
 

Grizzlybrew

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I used to do that in a preheated oven. It actually worked pretty good.

I've seen some other people say that. It seems like a great idea. I've caramelized onions (for french onion soup) in the oven before and I know Alton Brown suggests making dark roux's in the oven like that also.
 
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