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Parti-Gyle help

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moorerm04

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So I am thinking of doing a parti-gyle brew for my next brew day. Thinking of maybe doing a barley wine or Wee heavy for my first running, but I'm a little intimidated by the whole idea. Would I just pick a high gravity beer for my first runnings, and batch sparge to pre-boil volume like any other. Then basically re-sparge for my next volume of my second beer? Have any if you had success with this, any recipe ideas?
 

Yooper

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So I am thinking of doing a parti-gyle brew for my next brew day. Thinking of maybe doing a barley wine or Wee heavy for my first running, but I'm a little intimidated by the whole idea. Would I just pick a high gravity beer for my first runnings, and batch sparge to pre-boil volume like any other. Then basically re-sparge for my next volume of my second beer? Have any if you had success with this, any recipe ideas?
I noticed that my sparge runnings (especially the second sparge runnings) are pretty low. which is a good thing, normally, since you want maximum extraction!

But if I was doing a partigyle, I"d probably make a big beer with the first runnings, and then use the sparge runnings for the second wort.

This probably can help guestimate your probable OG: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Batch_Sparge_and_Party_Gyle_Simulator
 

gbx

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The simplest way is to just resparge but your big beer has to be massive (>1.090) to get even a 1.035 small beer if you are shooting for 2 equal volumed batches. The next easiest way is to just make one of the batches smaller. I like to collect first, 2nd and 3rd in 3 buckets and then blend to get the desired gravities in my pots. And unless you want to brew all day, get a second burner (either a second gas burner or use the stove top for at least one of the gyles) so you can get them both going at once.
 

cluckk

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I just did a parti-gyle of a Scotch Ale and a Scottish 70/-. Scottish beer styles are perfect for a parti-gyle because they are stepped by gravity, but otherwise pretty much the same--Scottish 60/-, 70/- and 80/-, then the Scottish 90/- (AKA the Wee Heavy or Scotch Ale).

My Scotch Ale had an OG of 1.080, the parti-gyle batch (the 70 shilling) had a gravity of 1.037. I mashed, sparged and then batch sparged with 6.5 gallons and simply took the gravity that I ended up with on the parti-gyle batch. I did have to add a pound of Brewer's Sugar to this batch to push it up.

I haven't found a way yet to calculate these with Beer Smith, so choose two beers that have an identical grain makeup and then do variety with the hops and yeasts and whatever you end up with will be acceptable. For example, you could try a RIS and an American Stout, or something similar.
 

Sir Humpsalot

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Another option is to add a bit more grain for your second runnings. There's no reason you must keep the grain bill identical. For example, you could take a bunch of two-row to make a barleywine... and then add some crystal malt and make an amber... or some roasted barley to make a stout. Your second beer can be darker than your first with a little extra grain.

Although this isn't historically accurate, you can also cheat. If you make a decent-sized barleywine, and follow that by a pale ale using 3lbs of DME added in, you can get a big beer and a normal-sized beer, for the price of a couple pounds of DME. If you wish to use more historical methods, you can also do a 3-5 hour boil on your second runnings to increase the gravity. But sometimes, it's worth it to just throw a little malt extract in there instead.

I have also added more two row into a mash that's already had the first runnings run through. You lose a little bit of efficiency, but you don't need more than a couple pounds of grain to get a normal-strength second beer. Just remember that if you do this, you have to wait for the new grains to convert. And if you pull too much out using this technique, you may get some tannins from the husks of the grain.
 

snaps10

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I once mashed for 30min some C40 then added it to the mash tun as soon when I added water for my partigyl. Mashed for an additional 30 min. Then I had my two boils going 30 min apart. I put some liquid extract in too.

Don't have a clue what the beer turned out to be, something like an Old Ale style. Around 1.060. It worked well. Beer tasted good.
 
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