Pale Chocolate, American Chocolate etc.

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conpewter

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What are the differences in these chocolate malts? I know there are several different kinds but I don't know what flavors and intensity of flavor they will add.
 

mmb

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Other than the obvious SRM color addition difference, to my pallet I find that pale chocolate lends less of a coffee and more of a toasted roast flavor. Smoother flavor than regular chocolate. I like using some with standard chocolate just for a more complex malt "roast".
 
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conpewter

conpewter

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Thanks! I actually did half pale and half regular chocolate in the last stout I did, we'll see how that turns out. I ordered ingredients from BrewMasters Warehouse and I accidently ordered pale chocolate malt instead of chocolate malt so I'll need to use it somewhere, also will have to pick a couple pounds of American chocolate up at a local shop.
 
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conpewter

conpewter

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This is what I get from AustinHomebrew. I can't find much on English chocolate malt.

"Pale Chocolate" refers more to the color of this malt rather than to its flavor. It is lighter in color than chocolate malt and its flavor contribution will be milder and softer. It does have a rich roasted coffee flavor when used in higher percentages, and that flavor is complimentary to porters, stouts, browns, and other darker beers. Pale chocolate malt can be used in all beer styles for color adjustments with minor to no flavor contributions. The usage rate for darker beers is 1-10% of the total grain bill.

"Chocolate" refers more to the color of this malt rather than its flavor. It does have a rich roasted coffee/cocoa flavor when used in higher percentages, and that flavor is complimentary to porters, stouts, browns, and other darker beers. Chocolate malt can be used in all beer styles for color adjustments with minor to no flavor contributions. The usage rate for porters and stouts is 1-10% of the total grain bill.

Austin Homebrew has great descriptions and I shop with them fairly often.
 
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