Pale Ale too light maybe not balanced

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physast

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I just brewed a pale ale partial mash using 2row, victory and crystal 40, and gold light LME. I hopped with centennial(sp) and cascade mainly using the centennial for dry hopping and aroma.

The beer is good and in a blind taste test half the people chose mine over Sierra Nevada.

To me it seems too much on the light bodied side. And almost too much of a floral/fruity taste, but not by much.

Is there something to add, maybe a caramel malt to get more body and taste or to just even out the beer more?
 

humann_brewing

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I just brewed a pale ale partial mash using 2row, victory and crystal 40, and gold light LME. I hopped with centennial(sp) and cascade mainly using the centennial for dry hopping and aroma.

The beer is good and in a blind taste test half the people chose mine over Sierra Nevada.

To me it seems too much on the light bodied side. And almost too much of a floral/fruity taste, but not by much.

Is there something to add, maybe a caramel malt to get more body and taste or to just even out the beer more?
We need the details of the recipe, but I am wondering why you used 2-row if this was a partial-mash brew?
 
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physast

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I am not sure why I wouldn't have used 2-row with a partial-mash? Should I have used something different.

Recipe:
4lb 2-row
.5lb victory
.5lb crystal 40
3.3lb Gold LME

Hops:
.5 cascade @ 60
.5 centennial @ 60
.5 cascade @ 15
.5 cascade @ 10
.5 cascade @ 5
.5 cascade @ 0
.5 cascade dry hop
.5 centennial dry hop

wyeast 1056

Mashed @ 153 for 60 minutes
boiled for 60 minutes

I think maybe the centennial hops @ 60 might have imposed more citruis than I would have liked
 

DeathBrewer

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Of course you need 2-row. It's your base malt. I'm not sure what humann is talking about.

For a good malt backbone, you want a couple pounds of munich or vienna. Or you could use Marris Otter as your base instead of american 2-row for a more malty, grainy background.
 

humann_brewing

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I am not sure why I wouldn't have used 2-row with a partial-mash? Should I have used something different.

Recipe:
4lb 2-row
.5lb victory
.5lb crystal 40
3.3lb Gold LME

Hops:
.5 cascade @ 60
.5 centennial @ 60
.5 cascade @ 15
.5 cascade @ 10
.5 cascade @ 5
.5 cascade @ 0
.5 cascade dry hop
.5 centennial dry hop

wyeast 1056

Mashed @ 153 for 60 minutes
boiled for 60 minutes

I think maybe the centennial hops @ 60 might have imposed more citruis than I would have liked
Sorry, I misunderstood, I didn't know you actually mashed your grains, I started brewing as a mini-mash brewer, but only steeped the specialty grains. I never got into mashing until all grain.

This looks like a good recipe. I am not up on all the extracts, but is the Gold a lighter extract?

Keep in mind that both of these hops do exactly what you are describing. They a citrisy/floral aroma to them, some say that Centennial is a supped up cascasde. If you wanted to stay away from that you could have gone with a different hop or a different mixture with the later additions. But with all that Cascade for your late additions you are going to have a citrisy taste and dry hopping with them is giving you that aroma which I like personally in a APA.
 

david_42

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Most of the aroma comes from the 5 and 0 minutes adds and the dryhopping. They will fade over the next few months.
 

SnickASaurusRex

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In place of 2-row pale (2L) you could use a Pale Ale malt (4L) it is kilned slightly higher and is slightly darker. Briese and Castle make one or you could get some Maris Otter. These will all lend great character and complexity. They are not quite as diastatic as 2-row pale but will convert themselves and some specialty grains.

Raising your mash temp up to 155 - 157 will increase the body also.
 

DeathBrewer

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Sorry, I misunderstood, I didn't know you actually mashed your grains, I started brewing as a mini-mash brewer, but only steeped the specialty grains. I never got into mashing until all grain.
Just to clarify, you weren't doing a "mini-mash". A mini mash would require base malt as well. You are steeping when you are using only specialty grains, you aren't technically doing ANY type of mash without base malt.
 

humann_brewing

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Of course you need 2-row. It's your base malt. I'm not sure what humann is talking about.

For a good malt backbone, you want a couple pounds of munich or vienna. Or you could use Marris Otter as your base instead of american 2-row for a more malty, grainy background.
Yep, I'm an idiot here. actually I was a clueless brewer before joining this forum and probably only know about 5% of what I should to make the beer I want to from a recipe I created.

Anyways, I started as a extract w/specialty grain brewer and just knew that you steeped the specialty grains, I forgot/didn't realize that you could do a mini-mash :confused: now it makes more sense. I do realize that 2-row is the base grain though. Now I recall seeing posts of people with mini sized coolers for mashing and it all makes sense. Also your link for "Easy Partial mash" post. Thanks Death.
 
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physast

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I am new myself, but really enjoy partial mashing. All the new toys and tons of possibilities. I still do a pure extract now and then also.

The aroma is right on with this beer! And personally I think the taste is good like it is for what it is. I am trying to come up with a good cheap beer that can always be on tap and everyone likes. APA was my first choice because it's easy and most people like it.

I have had people say that it has a fruity flavor to it. An I guess it does kinda have a mild citrus tone to it. One person even said it almost has a wheat beer taste to it...

I think for my next batch I will try to darken slightly with maybe some. Maybe add some more victory for color and some pale ale for complexity?

What would happen if instead of adding the hops towards the end of the boil I added more in the beginning. Like maybe 45 and 30?
 

DeathBrewer

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Mild citrus = centennial and cascade. The fruitiness is also probably from the hops...some describe "grapefruit" as well.

You definitely need something a little more malty in there, IMO. Pale Ale Malt would do it, instead of using the standard 2-row, plus I would still at least add a pound of vienna.

If you really want to add some character, throw 2 ounces of chocolate in there. It will add a hint of color and round out the flavor.
 
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