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eljefebrewing

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I scrubbed out my friggin' 'uge 15-gallon kettle last night, filled it about 2/3 full with water, and cranked up the outdoor burner. It took about an hour to reach boiling. The strange thing is, I went to check it after about 45 minutes, and it wasn't boiling as much, even though the flames were still going! Even stranger, I came back a few minutes later, and it wasn't boiling at all! Flame still on and all! I took the temp, and it was between 208 and 210. So, even though it wasn't fully boiling for a full hour, do you think I got enough passive oxide built up on the pot? Here's a pic:



It's definitely darker in the area that contained water, but it's not black... does it need to be?
 

RedIrocZ-28

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You're making me nervous here. My 7.5gal AL pot never got that dark coating. A very slight color difference is all I got and I have brewed up like 4 batches in it, but not tasted any of them - yet. I was not aware that they are supposed to get dark coloration like that.

Sorry I can't help. Also, did you put the lid on?
 
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eljefebrewing

eljefebrewing

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You're making me nervous here. My 7.5gal AL pot never got that dark coating. A very slight color difference is all I got and I have brewed up like 4 batches in it, but not tasted any of them - yet. I was not aware that they are supposed to get dark coloration like that.

Sorry I can't help. Also, did you put the lid on?
No, don't have a lid... the pot was one my grandfather used to make scrapple in, back in Pennsylvania. It's at least 2 ft. in diameter. Don't know where I'd be able to find a lid to fit it!
 

ifishsum

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I think it looks perfectly normal - my AL brew pot is at least that dark between oxidation and wort staining. It doesn't need to turn black, and some AL pots might have a coating on them that would keep the oxidation from happening. Brew away I say, you've definitely got an oxidized coating on it.
 

Beau815

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Mine turned pretty dark.. but the steam that's above the water level ALWAYS cleans the black layer off when i boil... and what the hell is scrapple?
 

jgln

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Mine turned pretty dark.. but the steam that's above the water level ALWAYS cleans the black layer off when i boil... and what the hell is scrapple?
Never heard of scrapple? It is scraps of pig left over after they butcher what they really want (pork chops, bacon) and chopped up and then packaged into blocks. That is at least what it was at one time, maybe today it is of better quality meat (parts) but I doubt it. It was a way to make use of every part of the pig and not waste any of it. I think it is just a thing in this area of NJ and PA. I don't care for it as it seems salty to me or maybe that is just how it was prepared. I can eat it though.
 
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eljefebrewing

eljefebrewing

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Scrapple is like one step down from Spam....
Oh, no, no, no... :)

Scrapple is a Pennsylvania Dutch breakfast item. Made with buckwheat flour and meat, spices, etc. Got a nice texture. You fry it up and eat it (if preferred) with apple butter. It's one of those things that tastes really good, as long as you don't ask what's in it. :)
 

Beau815

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MAN! That does NOT sound appetizing to me... that sure is a funny name for that though. And your beer may taste like a salty pigs foot.
 

chumprock

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My wife is from Ballmer, and her family loves scrapple.

I think it looks like pressed dog food, but to each their own I guess!
 

jgln

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MAN! That does NOT sound appetizing to me... that sure is a funny name for that though. And your beer may taste like a salty pigs foot.
I think it is not really all that uncommon practice especially in Europe. My fiancee is Ukrainian and even though they have something similar and eat weird things (calf brains) even she won't eat it.
 
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eljefebrewing

eljefebrewing

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MAN! That does NOT sound appetizing to me... that sure is a funny name for that though. And your beer may taste like a salty pigs foot.
You'd be missing out. It's tasty!

I scrubbed the pot out well, then did the boil to get the oxide layer. I figure that should protect me. Besides, if the pot could store up flavors (and it's not cast iron, so I don't think it can!) it would taste like crab, which is what my father used the pot for. That thing is going to have some lineage! Scrapple for Grandpop, crab cooker for Dad, and beer for me! :)
 
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eljefebrewing

eljefebrewing

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Yeah, before it's fried up until it's crispy on the outside, slightly soft in the middle, it does kind of look like that. Just eat it, though. Tastes good. I wish it were available out here in OR, but probably 99% of people (or higher!) have never heard of it.
 

llazy_llama

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I thought Scrapple was the Wal-Mart version of Snapple.

And to the OP, that's about what my aluminum brewpot looks like. It doesn't need to be jet black, just dark.
 

Belmont

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See if you can find an AL bowl that is at least as large in diameter if you want a lid. I have to brew with a lid because I have so many trees that you can't tell that there's a house on my lot from a satellite photo. I keep it slightly open though because it will boil over if it's closed completely. With the bowl I'm not sure how you'd accomplish the same. Maybe vent it with holes or slits. That would help to keep things out and add some pressure in the pot for more vigorous boil.
 
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eljefebrewing

eljefebrewing

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That would be one big bowl... the pot is at least 2 ft. in diameter. I'll have to measure it.
 

jgln

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That would be one big bowl... the pot is at least 2 ft. in diameter. I'll have to measure it.
Might take some time finding one but I know they make pizza pans close to that size. I will measure mine when I get home, I think it may be close to that size. I use a smaller pizza pan (never used for baking) to cover my big pot.
 

Beau815

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Pork roll? Nope. Whats that? Similar? and lmao to scrapple was walmarts version of snapple.
 

jgln

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Pork roll? Nope. Whats that? Similar? and lmao to scrapple was walmarts version of snapple.
Really???

Funny isn't it how some foods are so local to an area. We really like our pig meats around here I guess. My hometown here in NJ was a big area for pig farms and still has a few. As a young kid we had pig pens from the pig farm behind our house right up to our fence.

Pork Roll is a roll of processed pork meat that has been smoked or at least has smoked flavor. It is leaner than scrapple, probably better meat but I love it. Both are basically breakfast meats. You have to cook it, usually in a skillet but you can do it in a microwave. It comes in a roll about 3-4" in dia. and you slice it. Grew up on pork roll sandwiches on white bread. I like butter on the bread but pork roll is already greasy. I don't know exactly the ingredients in it but an internet search will tell you.
 
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eljefebrewing

eljefebrewing

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I measured it when I went home for lunch. I guess it looks bigger than it really is! It's only 17" in diameter, so your pizza pan idea sounds pretty good!
 

VonStigler

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Scrapple beer...yummm. I actually just made scrapple 2 nights ago, it is one of my favorite breakfast foods that is good at any time of the day. Sure it's made from the scraps, but the whole pig tastes great IMO! Besides, you all would eat a hot dog, right? Think of all the crap and additives that are in THAT.
Scrapple must be a PA/NJ/DE/MD thing I guess. I grew up eating it and I love it.
 

VonStigler

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Pork roll is awesome too, I make it with sauerkraut and noodles and everyone loves it.
You guys are making me hungry.
 

Beau815

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Ever heard of chicken riggies or tomato pie? Both are HUGE upstate and no one knows what they are... chicken riggies are AWESOME!
 

VonStigler

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Tomato pie, yes. Thick, soft bread with a thick layer of homemade sauce and lots of garlic and olive oil, served cold like cake. Now you are speaking my language! Chicken riggies--no idea, but I bet it's good.
 

Kuglehaus

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In Pennsylvania the "pork roll" you are referencing is called "puddin" or "pudding". As a son of PA Dutch cooking... I can say it's best on fresh buttermilk pancake with a thin layer of ketchup and mustard. mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Um I guess could be something else, the puddin isn't smoked... hmm
 

VonStigler

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A slice of tomato pie would be great with my homebrew right now, sorry for turning this thread into a food thread, but there are just too many good things in THIS area!
 

beerocd

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Guy Fierri (sp?) on food network shows scrapple on diners drive ins and dives. Looks good to me.

-OCD
 

Beau815

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Chicken Riggies are my favorite food... chicken with riggies obviously, as spicy as you want with hot cherry peppers, stewed tomatoes which dissipate, onions, oil, butter, garlic, shrooms and olives if you like em. White wine and heavy cream.... man its heaven. Utica NY thing that im SO surprised isn't nationwide. Haha i just looked up "chicken riggies" to get a link and it said "This is Utica, New York's specialty dish" thats so funny because its crappy little utica, this is the best thing here tho.... and yes sorry this turned to a food thread but this goes GREAT with beer! Chicken Riggies - Allrecipes I am also unaware of "souse" enlighten..
 

Kuglehaus

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Souse and Head Cheese are the same meat, different presentation sometimes, depends on the person using the word...

Wikipedia -

Head cheese (AmE) or brawn (BrE) is a cold cut originating from Europe. Head cheese is in fact not a cheese, but meat pieces from the head of a calf or pig (sometimes a sheep or cow), in aspic, with onion, black pepper, allspice, bayleaf, salt and or vinegar. It may also include meat from the feet, tongue and heart. It is usually eaten cold or at room temperature as a luncheon meat. It is sometimes also known as souse meat, particularly if pickled with vinegar.

Historically meat jellies were made of the cleaned (all organs removed) head of the animal, which was simmered to produce stock, a peasant food made since the Middle Ages. When cooled, stock made from meat congeals because of the natural gelatin found in the meat. The aspic may need additional gelatin in order to set properly.
 

jgln

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Chicken Riggies are my favorite food... chicken with riggies obviously, as spicy as you want with hot cherry peppers, stewed tomatoes which dissipate, onions, oil, butter, garlic, shrooms and olives if you like em. White wine and heavy cream.... man its heaven. Utica NY thing that im SO surprised isn't nationwide. Haha i just looked up "chicken riggies" to get a link and it said "This is Utica, New York's specialty dish" thats so funny because its crappy little utica, this is the best thing here tho.... and yes sorry this turned to a food thread but this goes GREAT with beer! Chicken Riggies - Allrecipes I am also unaware of "souse" enlighten..
That sounds like Chicken Cacciatore but that is made, around here anyway, with egg noodles. Never heard of Riggies.
 

jgln

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In Pennsylvania the "pork roll" you are referencing is called "puddin" or "pudding". As a son of PA Dutch cooking... I can say it's best on fresh buttermilk pancake with a thin layer of ketchup and mustard. mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Um I guess could be something else, the puddin isn't smoked... hmm
No, that doesn't sound the same. Taylor's pork roll is popular around here and you can do an internet search.
 

Beau815

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No not the same, i dont even like Chicken Cacciatore, and Chicken Riggies is my favorite dish... general tsos chicken is my second.
 
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