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Oyster Porter- Strange beer recpies

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The Professor

The Professor

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I am so glad you brought up this interesting topic. I saw a recipe that called for a whole chicken with its bones broken to be fermented with the ale. You've got to love the colonial times.
 

Ken Powers

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The Professor said:
I am so glad you brought up this interesting topic. I saw a recipe that called for a whole chicken with its bones broken to be fermented with the ale. You've got to love the colonial times.
I don't know how strange this is professor but I have tried putting many different things in my beer. In fact I like to add a little cayenne pepper when I brew a chocolate stout to slightly accentuate the chocolate flavor and add a hint of zip.
 
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The Professor

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I have heard that adding some pepper(s) to a stout or porter can be quite nice. I have yet to try it though. I saw a recipe for a green chili wheat ale that looked interesting.

Other odd recipe ideas:

Carrot Beer
Garlick Beer
Sweet Potato Beer
Liqorice Ale
Green Apple Jolly Rancher Lambic

And of course a summer beer complete with lawn clippings.

Thanks for the response Ken.
 

NUCC98

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I was thinking of brewing up either a brown ale, or a nut brown ale. Then, right before bottling, steeping a whole vanilla bean and some chopped walnuts for about an hour to make a sort of tea to be added to the fermented wort to make a Vanilla Walnut Brown Ale......
 

Toilet Rocker

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I remember reading a mushroom one in a bookstore one time. Sounded amazing. Wish I had bought the book. I'm sure it's rotten, but mushrooms rule.
 

Baron von BeeGee

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Genghis77 said:
I've been thinking of a sweet potato beer. Anyone have a recipe?
I was reading in the paper yesterday about a drink in Japan, shochu I think, that is made from fermented and distilled sweet potatoes to around 50 proof. Reading between the lines of the article it sounded like it's fermented in open containers with some of the microbes in the distillery contributing to the fermentation, much like a lambic or geuze (sp?). Sounded kind of interesting...apparently it's more popular now in Japan than sake.
 

Orfy

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The Professor said:
I am so glad you brought up this interesting topic. I saw a recipe that called for a whole chicken with its bones broken to be fermented with the ale. You've got to love the colonial times.
I'm sure one of the guys on here (Maybe Walker) put up a recipe for "Cock Ale":eek:
 

bobbyc

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I heard of a tomato beer being brewed in Japan recently, too. I've had some Chipotle Ale from Rogue... not all that impressive.

I was also under the impression that Oyster Stouts/Porters don't actually have oysters in them, they were just named as such because they were consumed with oysters. I could be wrong, though.
 

Gustav83

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Was in Portland, OR last week and tasted an Oyster Porter. We passed it around the table. There was no taste of oysters. Since we all live in oyster heaven, we've decided to develop our own oyster porter.
Any ideas as to how to introduce the taste of oysters? We have easy access to raw oysters at our back doors.
 

tnvol

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I haven't used walnuts but I've used vanilla beans quite a bit in Nut Brown Ales.
I've even infused my priming sugar with vanilla. Always turns out pretty good.

I was thinking of brewing up either a brown ale, or a nut brown ale. Then, right before bottling, steeping a whole vanilla bean and some chopped walnuts for about an hour to make a sort of tea to be added to the fermented wort to make a Vanilla Walnut Brown Ale......
 

h0psnobery

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Was in Portland, OR last week and tasted an Oyster Porter. We passed it around the table. There was no taste of oysters. Since we all live in oyster heaven, we've decided to develop our own oyster porter.
Any ideas as to how to introduce the taste of oysters? We have easy access to raw oysters at our back doors.
Here's a recipe from BYO magazine:

Black Pearl Oyster Stout

5 gallons/19 L, all-grain with bivalve mollusks; OG = 1.052 FG = 1.013; IBU = 37; SRM = 60; ABV = 5.0%

Ingredients:

9.0 lbs. (4.1 kg) 2-row pale malt
0.5 lb. (0.22 kg) flaked oats
1.0 lb. (0.45 kg) roasted barley
0.5 lb. (0.22 kg) chocolate malt
0.25 lb. (0.11 kg) black patent malt
10 oz. (283 g) raw oysters and brine
1 tsp. Irish moss (15 mins)
8.6 AAU Fuggles hops (60 mins) (1.5 oz./43 g of 5.7% alpha acids)
4.3 AAU Fuggles hops (20 mins) (0.75 oz./21 g of 5.7% alpha acids)
Wyeast 1084 (Irish Ale) yeast
Step by Step:

Mash grains for 45 minutes at 152 °F (67 °C). Boil wort for 120 minutes. Add hops at times indicated. Add oysters and Irish moss with 15 minutes left. Cool wort. Transfer to fermenter, leaving oyster bits behind. (Don’t eat the oysters, Joe and Jim say they taste terrible.) Aerate, pitch yeast and ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

Extract with grains option:

Replace 2-row pale malt with 14 oz. (0.40 kg) Briess Light dried malt extract, 3 lbs. 14 oz. (1.8 kg) Muntons Light liquid malt extract and 2.0 lbs. (0.91 kg) 2-row pale malt. In a 3 gallon (11 L) or larger stock pot, heat 1.6 gallons (6 L) of water to 163 °F (73 °C). Placed crushed grains and flaked oats in a large steeping bag and submerge bag in this hot water. Maintain temperature at 148–153 °F (64–67 °C) for 45 minutes. While grains mash, heat one gallon (3.8 L) of water to 170 °F (77 °C).

Remove grain bag from steeping pot and place in colander over stock pot. Rinse grains with 0.75 gallons (2.8 L) of water from brewpot. Combine “grain tea” and dried malt extract with remaining hot water in brewpot and heat to a boil. Boil 60 minutes, adding hops at times remaining indicated in recipe. With 15 minutes left in the boil, add liquid malt extract, oysters and Irish moss.

Stir thoroughly to dissolve extract. (Keep the clock running even though it will take a few minutes for the wort to resume boiling.) Cool wort and transfer to fermenter, leaving oyster bits behind. Add water to make 5 gallons (19 L). Aerate, pitch yeast and ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

(All-grain recipe from “Oyster Stout: A seaworthy stout experiment” by Joe Walton, January-February 2004, p. 64.)
 

Darwin18

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Rise zombie thread rise!

I did try a oyster stout at the Lobster Trap in Asheville that I really enjoyed. The description of the brewing process included photos being shown of the brewer adding oysters to the boil which made me want to vomit. The smell must have been awful...However the stout was solid and had a rich full mouthfeel from all the calcium from the oyster shells.
 

Xpertskir

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I was also under the impression that Oyster Stouts/Porters don't actually have oysters in them, they were just named as such because they were consumed with oysters. I could be wrong, though.

Ive had a few oyster stouts....and yep they have oysters in them.


3Floyds also makes an oyster sauce stout which is interesting..and good.
 

andvari7

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Flying Dog makes an oyster stout. It's a good stout, but not very...oyster-y... I was disappointed, because I wanted to be a bold man who first did eat an oyster.
 

Gustav83

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Made a 5-gal batch of smoked oyster stout last September. Hoping to develop a recipe that can eventually be produced by our local micro-brewery. I live in oyster rearing country, where anything oyster is popular with locals, but visitors are fearful of the flavor. The combination of slight oyster and smoke flavor was chosen for the first batch for this reason and it's a hit. I'll do another batch, slightly more "oyster-y" and do a comparison. We're convinced that if you want people to like (and buy) it those flavors better be subtle.
 

ASoles

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I just bought the beast kit today! Brand new to all of this brewing stuff. Excited to get brewing!
 
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