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Trodd

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So according to the Iodophor Bottle, it says a cap full of sanitizer per 2.5 gal of water. If you add too much, does it make the sanitizer not work as well?

Also I was just futzin around MoreBeer.com and they say Iodophor is a 5-10 minute contact time, I think the bottle says 2 minute. what are others doing? I've been using the 2 minute, and have had some infected batches.
 

Nerro

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More iodophor will disinfect faster because the resultant solution will be more chemically active. Dilution merely lengthens the required contact time.

To make sure you disinfect properly why not just leave your glassware and other utensils in the iodophor for 15 minutes or so?
 

malkore

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if you mix too strong a concentration, it may leave residue behind...making it require rinsing to avoid off flavors in your beer.

and if you rinse iodiphor, you're adding possible contaminents back into the equipment since tap water isn't necessarily 'sanitary' for beer making.
 

ShortSnoutBrewing

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I don't have a link right now, but there was a great interview on the Basic Brewing pod cast. If I recall, using too much is actually not a good thing. They spoke with a gentleman from National Chemicals. Also speaks about "wet" time, etc.

I suggest taking a listen.
 

menschmaschine

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Many microorganisms essentially have a water regulation system in their cell membrane. They let water in and out (along with waste). To an extent they can detect when they're in a harmful environment. When they sense this, they close down the system and don't let water through. When we use sanitizers, we're trying to trick them into thinking it's still OK to let water in... and then BAM!... they let sanitizer in too and it kills them. Too much sanitizer (high concentration) and they won't let any water OR sanitizer through the cell membrane. They'll just close down and wait for the environment to change to something in which they can survive. As an example, this is why 70% Isopropyl alcohol is a more effective sanitizer than the 91%.
 
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Trodd

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Yeah, I actually listened to that pod cast last night while coming home from NH. It has tons of information. After listening to both parts of it, I think that I may switch sanitizers to StarSans. Does anyone have any advice or suggestions related to that sanitizer?
 

Nerro

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While it is true that the microbes will try to protect themselves from pollution they won´t survive iodine exposure anyhow. It tears them up doesn't it? Seems aggressive enough to me.

Another great way to get rid of bacteria is H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide). This can be bought as-is (in solutions ranging from 3% to 30% by volume, which equates roughly to 1 to 10 molar solutions respectively) or as crystals (in which case it's actually hydrogen peroxide caught in the crystal lattice of some simple carbonate). In both cases it's effective on it's own. It can be made to be even more corrosive with the addition of an acid. This is a very effective way of sanitizing. And the hydrogen peroxide won't leave any flavours behind since it just degrades into water and oxidized dead bacteria.

On another note, is it really such a huge risk to rinse with tap water? Do you drink water from bottles or from the tap? It varies from country to country. Here in the Netherlands tap water is drinkable so I'll trust it for a quick rinse.
A few bacteria probably arent such a huge problem. They'll be out competed by the comparatively huge population of yeast cells anyway.
 

superfluent

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Trodd said:
So according to the Iodophor Bottle, it says a cap full of sanitizer per 2.5 gal of water. If you add too much, does it make the sanitizer not work as well?

Also I was just futzin around MoreBeer.com and they say Iodophor is a 5-10 minute contact time, I think the bottle says 2 minute. what are others doing? I've been using the 2 minute, and have had some infected batches.
I've said this a couple of times so I almost feel like a broken record here, but my bro who makes his living as a PhD in "wet" biochemistry says iodophore will work as a no rinse sanatizer diluted to 12.5 ppm (usually 1:1000) with a 30-60 second soak time (he says soaking for more than a minute won't sanatize more).

When it comes to bacteria and yeast "soak" dosn't really mean the gear have to be immersed in sanatizer, rather you just need to get the surface wet by sploshing a quart or so of solution around in the fermentation vessel (or whatever) and the bad stuff will soak in the solution on a microscopic level. Wait for 60 seconds, poor the solution out and put in the wort. With a 12.5 ppm solution there is no need to let the gear dry before using it.

The most important thing is to first clean the gear. Iodophore, as most sanatizers, is a surface sanatizer so it will not penetrate or clean away any soil left on the gear.

At 24 ppm and above it will disinfect, but then you'll have to rinse it off to be sure the food put in the container won't pick up any of the taste. If you rinse with tap water you're most likely adding bacteria back compared to using the 12.5 ppm solution.

H
 

Revvy

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At my LBHS when I got my last bottle of Idophor, they handed me a sheet with new recommendations from the company. 1 tbs/ 5 gallons of water gives you a 30 second contact time. The water should be the color of light straw.

I have a dedicated sanitizing sponge I use to make wet contact with my fermentor or bottling bucket. I just fill the bucket up a few inches then "wash" the bucket with the sponge. I make a few passes over everything.

I also no longer fill my carboys all the way up to sanitize them. I put a couple gallons in them, and turn them on their side and gently roll them around for a few minutes, making sure the level of liquid is up the neck enough, but not too much so any solution comes out.
 
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