outdoor brewing

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fluketamer

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didnt want to start a new thread but all the ones related i found were 10 plus years old, so didnt want to resurrect an old one.

i brewed outside for the first time yesterday. it was really great. the kids didnt complain about the smell. and the wife didnt complain i was in the way.

it took a little longer to get to temps (it was 50 outside) but well worth it. going forward i will be brewing outside until winter when it drops below 50.
 
I started outside and it was much more adventurous than my indoor setup - having to battle the occasional wind-blown detritus, stinger-equipped wildlife 😳 and unexpected precipitation (rain or snow). Almost two decades older now I really appreciate the comfort of brewing indoors any time of year :)

Cheers!
 
having to battle the occasional wind-blown detritus, stinger-equipped wildlife 😳 and unexpected precipitation (rain or snow).
Those stinger-equipped guys are especially fond of wort I have discovered, especially the variety that come out late summer.
But such is the life of a brewer who has been banned from the kitchen for the past thirty years.
 
One great thing about brewing outside is easy clean up. Even if one screws up, the mess is minimal, and it's easier to clean up at end of brew session if one can just hose it all down, dump in driveway, etc.

Also no worries venting steam, & gas fumes, if not electric yet.

When the wort is done, it is pumped to cellar, no carrying heavy containers around.

Hot side of brew station over last 5 years;

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I brew outdoors almost exclusively. Like 95 gallons out of every hundred. All weather, but I try to avoid below 20 degrees F and/or very windy days. Spills and cleanup are not an issue. I use a cooler for a mash tun, so I don't lose more than one degree F during mashing. I just don't want to deal with a burner in my attached garage, and don't want to convert to electric.

Stinger equipped guys are an issue from time to time, but i fish them out and nobody knows but me......and you
 
I love brewing, (biab), outside on my back patio. I have overhead pergola that I attach a ratcheting pulley to hoist the bag. Plus, when we moved in to our house there was already a natural gas line pretty much right where I brew. When I bought my Blichmann burner I also bought the conversion kit to take advantage of that, (I also converted my Weber gas grill to use nat gas - no tanks!!). Besides the gas, I have electric out there, my music, and a hose nearby for easy cleanup. Our house sits about half way down a 400 yard fairway, and I often have golfers stopping by to see what's cooking. Weather here is great, year round. We do get a few rainy days, primarily in January-March, but it's usually sunny and pleasant, 75° in the summer and typically 60-65° in the winter. What's not to like about it.
In fact I'll be out there tomorrow, (Tuesday), brewing up a batch of cream ale. :mug:
 
Yeah I enjoy outdoor brewing as well. The only issue I have is that my boil off rate varies significantly in wind.
 
Main thing I like about brewing outside, besides not hearing about the "overwhelming hops smell" is I get to be alone with my own thoughts, and no noise but my music. It's very relaxing.
Agreed!!! Music and making beer go together! I often do both .. make music and make beer (have a 1964 Martin and a 1970 Gibson Hummingbird)... Very relaxing and time flies.

I love brewing outside so much I had the electrician put the 220v receptacle on the wall outside the house so I could brew outside. (Brewzilla Gen 4)
 
Ya’ll are braver than I in regards to cold temps. I bought a ridiculously long GFCI cord that I utilize for my Anvil. The intent behind the length was so that I could run the length of it to the backyard patio. Perhaps run the smoker at the same time, hang out with the dog, throw some darts.

3-4 years or so after starting this hobby, that unit gets as far as the driveway for cleanup and brewing happens in the garage.
 
I started brewing outside because I was using propane burners so I always had to wait for a decent weather day to brew. Now, I went all electric and have been brewing the last few years inside, regardless of the weather. However, I did move my electric setup outside for a single brew day and it was fantastic. It definitely helped that it was a 70 degree brew day. Lots of work to get my stand up a flight of stairs. If I do it again, I'll definitely find an easier way to do it or have a friend help.
 
Ya’ll are braver than I in regards to cold temps. I bought a ridiculously long GFCI cord that I utilize for my Anvil. The intent behind the length was so that I could run the length of it to the backyard patio. Perhaps run the smoker at the same time, hang out with the dog, throw some darts.

3-4 years or so after starting this hobby, that unit gets as far as the driveway for cleanup and brewing happens in the garage.
I used to live in Wisconsin. Now in NC, so my worst day is usually in the teens or 20s.

Not bravery here with thermal wear.
 
I brew in the garage, but with both overhead doors open, so it's almost outdoors. 😁

I do have the option of closing them if the weather isn't ideal.

That's my "outdoor" method. If it's windy (as it often is here) I close the overhead door to just a crack to allow fresh air in.

One time that I had the door completely open the smell of wort drew a yellowjacket in for a suicide mission into the boil. I normally don't make labels but had to for that batch.

YellowjacketKolsch2.jpg
 
That's my "outdoor" method. If it's windy (as it often is here) I close the overhead door to just a crack to allow fresh air in.

One time that I had the door completely open the smell of wort drew a yellowjacket in for a suicide mission into the boil. I normally don't make labels but had to for that batch.

View attachment 846195
I had one in my last Kolsch too! Came out great ;)
 
My wife would appreciate it if I moved my mash and boiling steps outdoors because she (claims) that she can't stand the smell. I love the smell of brewing and don't understand her objections to it, but I always worry about running out of propane when using a tank - so I usually brew in the kitchen on the stovetop when she isn't home. One thing I always do when brewing outdoors is cover my wort with a mesh lid.
 
That's my "outdoor" method. If it's windy (as it often is here) I close the overhead door to just a crack to allow fresh air in.

One time that I had the door completely open the smell of wort drew a yellowjacket in for a suicide mission into the boil. I normally don't make labels but had to for that batch.

View attachment 846195
I brew on the back porch. I find it pleasant, my kitchen really isn’t big enough. I still end up with stuff all over the kitchen.

One spring there were a bunch of mosquitos. Some ended up in the mash. I was brewing an imperial stout and dry stout partigyle. I called them Mosquito Major and Mosquito Minor.
 
My wife would appreciate it if I moved my mash and boiling steps outdoors because she (claims) that she can't stand the smell. I love the smell of brewing and don't understand her objections to it, but I always worry about running out of propane when using a tank - so I usually brew in the kitchen on the stovetop when she isn't home. One thing I always do when brewing outdoors is cover my wort with a mesh lid.
My wife always try to find reasons to come in to the kitchen while I brew, at least from the sparge forward through the boil because she loves the bready fragrance of warm grains/wort.
Pro tip:get her in to baking.

I've been trying to brew outside but in the winter that means trying to convince liquid to boil in temps anywhere between -10c to -40c and summer means loads, I mean Alabama deep south marshlands levels, loads of mosqitoues if it's not a sunny day...
 
I never understood why the smells of brewing beer being so offensive to some. Maybe I was de-sensitized growing up in the 80s with my mom doing in house perms and many visits to a dairy farm of childhood friend.

I have a designated spot in the basement now with ventilation and I am loving it. Propane three burner system. once you know the quirks of your system making a mess is based on how many beers you drink in the process. I come to the reality of not drinking during brew mornings and am more efficient.
 
The only time I brew outside any more is on Big Brew Day or Learn to Brew day. I do 5 gal into fermenter batches short and shoddy BIAB and they always come out great.
 
I have always brewed indoors. First it was the kitchen brewery, which like most others here, my wife didn't like.

Now I have a dedicated basement spot with great ventilation. That's the key for indoor brewing. On a nice summer day, brewing outdoors sounds like fun though. I can open my double patio doors to the outside so I'm close.
 
Always brewed outside using full volume and propane, spring through late fall. Tried winter once. Got it done but too much PITA with all the steam and just in general with the temperature. So, I don't brew in the winter per se. Yeah, I can think of workarounds, but ain't no big thing for me not to brew during that time.
 
I'm an outdoor, edge of the garage, brewer. Three vessel, triple propane burner, except when I do decoction, then it's four burners. I brew year around, but fair weather - not on windy days or if it's going to rain too much.
 
When I first started brewing, it was indoors on the stove top. My wife had no problem with boiling wort until I dropped in the hops. It didn't take long until I moved outside. I started with a Bru-Heat setup and eventually settled on a propane burner and S/S kettle.
 
I brew outside on my back covered lanai. Once a month rain or shine, hot or cold I will be out there brewing up a batch. It can be a pain lugging out my 3 vessel e-herms from the garage and lugging it back in when I am done, but it works for me. Wish I had a basement for a permanent brewery set up. Or maybe a separate brew house in the back yard!

John
 
I brew outside on my back covered lanai. Once a month rain or shine, hot or cold I will be out there brewing up a batch. It can be a pain lugging out my 3 vessel e-herms from the garage and lugging it back in when I am done, but it works for me. Wish I had a basement for a permanent brewery set up. Or maybe a separate brew house in the back yard!

John
^^ lives only a few miles from me! And, my thoughts too. It's why I finally downsized my huge system to a 5g AIO.
 
In the Wisconsin countryside, I was usually fighting a combination of weather and insects and seldom got that magical "lovely brewday". One winter day was flirting with -20F and I froze the chiller hose between setup and use, and needless to say the ice cold keggle was a bear to clean with slush. But that was a new record on chill time.

So I built a 800 sqft kitchen space on the back of my garage. I'll open the windows if I want to feel the outdoors.
 
In the Wisconsin countryside, I was usually fighting a combination of weather and insects and seldom got that magical "lovely brewday". One winter day was flirting with -20F and I froze the chiller hose between setup and use, and needless to say the ice cold keggle was a bear to clean with slush. But that was a new record on chill time.

So I built a 800 sqft kitchen space on the back of my garage. I'll open the windows if I want to feel the outdoors.
Here's my record chill time. I think I got it to pitching temperature in 1 minute. Immersion chiller on the inside, massive water flow on outside, me stirring, Marley the wonderdog calling cadence.



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