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One of my four meads has stopped bubbling...

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TJ Booker

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Hey everyone! First-time mead-maker here. About two weeks ago I started 4 batches of mead. Each one is a gallon.

#1. 3lbs of honey, about 20 raisins as nutrient, and 1 pack lalvin D-47 yeast.
#2. 3lbs of honey, 2 packs of raspberries, about 20 raisins as nutrient, and 1 pack lalvin D-47 yeast.
#3. 2.5 lbs of honey, raisins, 2 thinly sliced peaches, and d-47 yeast
#4. 2.5 lbs of honey, raisins, and d-47 yeast.

Ok so here’s the thing... a couple days ago #3 (the peach one) stopped bubbling. I never measured the gravity, so I really don’t know if it’s done or what. Should I rack it and see if it starts bubbling again? Not sure where to go from here.
 
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Maylar

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Contrary to popular belief, raisins are NOT sufficient nutrient for a mead. You need actual yeast nutrient, Fermaid K or Fermaid O.

And what is the current gravity?
 
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TJ Booker

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I still have to order a hydrometer.

Also, all of the videos I’ve seen online use raisins. On top of that, the other three are still going just fine.
 

bernardsmith

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Hi TJ Booker - and welcome. If , as you say, you measured the gravity, you would know if the mead has stopped fermenting because it has stalled or because the yeast has no more sugar to convert into CO2 (the bubbles) and alcohol. I assume that you meant you measured the gravity after you saw no more bubbles rather than simply measured the gravity before you pitched (added) the yeast...Yes? If so, what is the gravity reading?
 

bernardsmith

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So you meant that you have not measured the gravity. OK No problem. The only thing is that bubbles tell you absolutely nothing about what is going on. A lack of bubbles can mean that you have a poor seal between airlock and bung or bung and carboy. Bubbles can mean that even if a mead/wine has stopped fermenting changes in temperature, in air-pressure, and particles dropping out of suspension can all cause gas to leave solution and bubble up. Bottom line: a wine maker needs an hydrometer to know what in fact is going on in the fermenter. Watching bubbles may be amusing but they provide zero information. Zero.

Oh... and 90% (and here I am being very generous) of what is self published on you-tube is garbage. Yeast need organic nitrogen and various other compounds and elements (like zinc). How much of those are in a handful of oxidized dried grapes? You got it: none. and the problem is that unlike some fruit, honey itself possesses none of the nutrients that yeast need to create a healthy and vigorous fermentation.
 
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TJ Booker

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Hi TJ Booker - and welcome. If , as you say, you measured the gravity, you would know if the mead has stopped fermenting because it has stalled or because the yeast has no more sugar to convert into CO2 (the bubbles) and alcohol. I assume that you meant you measured the gravity after you saw no more bubbles rather than simply measured the gravity before you pitched (added) the yeast...Yes? If so, what is the gravity reading?
Sorry, I meant that I never measured.
 
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