Quantcast

Omega Bayern yeast

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

sundog14

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 7, 2014
Messages
47
Reaction score
3
Hello, I am considering brewing my first Lager style beer and would like it to be a Pilsner. For about two years I have been using Omega yeasts with good success and would like to try their Bayern lager yeast (OYL-114). I have four questions.
Has anyone used this yeast and what were your results?
Does this yeast require a diacetyl rest?
Does it require a Lagering phase after fermentation?
Since I am a beekeeper, I typically use honey in all me ales. Is this OK for a Pilsner?

Many thanks, Tom
 

MrPowers

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2015
Messages
565
Reaction score
387
1. I used it in my Oktoberfest last year, it gave me the exact results I wanted. Almost identical to WY2352. My best batch of that specific beer to date. It’s not as dry/crisp as some other lager yeasts, but doesn’t leave cloying sweetness. Just full bodied maltiness.

2. It depends on your pitch rate/Yeast health. This one didn’t seem to throw as many off flavors/aromas in primary as others i’ve used though-2308 for example. I fermented at 52F.

3. Yes. It didn’t take long to clear for me though (maybe 2 weeks). You could drink as soon as it was clear and it tasted great. It did get better over the next couple of weeks though.

4. It’s homebrew, add whatever ingredients you like. Make it your own. I think it would go well in a pilsner, depending on all the rest of the recipe.
 
OP
S

sundog14

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 7, 2014
Messages
47
Reaction score
3
Thank you Mr. Powers!
I do have a follow-up on #3. When you state "This one didn’t seem to throw as many off flavors/aromas in primary as others I’ve used", do you mean that more diacetyl may be present after primary fermentation? And then it will take a longer diacetyl rest to remove these off flavors? I plan on maker a starter from the factory pouch.
Also, is the main function of Lagering to clarify the beer?

thanks again, Tom
 

BucksIPA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Messages
90
Reaction score
15
Hello, I am considering brewing my first Lager style beer and would like it to be a Pilsner. For about two years I have been using Omega yeasts with good success and would like to try their Bayern lager yeast (OYL-114). I have four questions.
Has anyone used this yeast and what were your results?
Does this yeast require a diacetyl rest?
Does it require a Lagering phase after fermentation?
Since I am a beekeeper, I typically use honey in all me ales. Is this OK for a Pilsner?

Many thanks, Tom
I believe that is the Augustiner strain. By far the best helles in munich. It should be the same as 2352, except 2352 is a special release and not available.

I would look up what the augustiner process is, you probably wont get much information since they keep the process pretty sealed. Look for a 3 month process., about a 2 month lager.

A diacetyl rest should be used, and you shouldn't have much of a problem with reducing it.

A pilsner should be dry, crisp, slight sweetness. Use german grain like weyermann. Play with the mash temp for the sweetness. You dont need adjucts or complicated grain bill with low amounts of other grains.
 
OP
S

sundog14

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 7, 2014
Messages
47
Reaction score
3
Thank you BucksIPA. Below is my grain bill...taken from stock.
6# Belgian Pilsner
4# American 2-row
1.0# Munich 10L
0.5# carapils
0.5 flaked corn
0.5 honey
Too complicated? Using the corn to take it out of stock. Maybe drop the Munich?
 

MrPowers

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2015
Messages
565
Reaction score
387
Thank you Mr. Powers!
I do have a follow-up on #3. When you state "This one didn’t seem to throw as many off flavors/aromas in primary as others I’ve used", do you mean that more diacetyl may be present after primary fermentation? And then it will take a longer diacetyl rest to remove these off flavors? I plan on maker a starter from the factory pouch.
Also, is the main function of Lagering to clarify the beer?

thanks again, Tom
I was stating that this specific yeast seemed to ferment cleaner than others I have used, meaning that there was less diacetyl and sulfur.

A diacetyl rest is only necessary if you can detect those flavors. With a good healthy starter (ie. approx 1 gallon starter for a 5 gallon batch), you probably won't need a diacetyl rest at all. If you do detect some diacetyl, 48 hours at 60-65Fis probably enough to clear it up.

It also helps reduce off flavors if you are able to ramp up the temperature slightly before the yeast are finished fermenting: ie. slow ramp from 50-55 over the course of a 7-10 day primary fermentation compared to a 2 week primary at 50 and then ramping to 65 for 2 days. This means the yeast are still active to clean up rather than having to be reawakened after they are already finished.


There are two main functions of lagering: clarifying and conditioning. Clarifying is pretty self explanatory: dropping out yeast and other clouding agents. Conditioning on the other hand, is the process of the yeast cleaning up off flavors. Therefore, if you get a very healthy primary ferment that doesn't produce many off flavors, you can dramatically shorten the lagering phase without negative effects. You can be drinking lagers as soon as they are clear in a few weeks rather than a few months. People default to saying you should spend 2 months lagering for your average beer, but that isn't always necessary.


**Take all of these guidelines with a grain of salt: my starter estimate of ~ 1 gal for a 5 gal batch is actually meant to convey that you want to pitch approx. 2 to 2.5billion cells per degree plato. This is higher than most yeast calcs recommend, but is becoming more widely accepted as a best practice for lagers. With this type of pitch rate, it is absolutely possible to ferment lagers out in 7 days and have them clear in conditioned in just a couple of weeks.

Edit: Also, lager in primary or in kegs as close to 30F as you can. Do not use a secondary, its unnecessary and just exposes your beer to more oxygen during the transfer.
 

BucksIPA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Messages
90
Reaction score
15
Thank you BucksIPA. Below is my grain bill...taken from stock.
6# Belgian Pilsner
4# American 2-row
1.0# Munich 10L
0.5# carapils
0.5 flaked corn
0.5 honey
Too complicated? Using the corn to take it out of stock. Maybe drop the Munich?
Id start a new topic over in the recipe forum. Id take out the corn/carapils/2row, and if honey is your touch than keep that. Increase the Belgian pilsner as like 85-90% of the grain bill.

You can work with the mash process to get the desired flavors, that is how the germans do it.
 
OP
S

sundog14

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 7, 2014
Messages
47
Reaction score
3
Thank you again Mr.Powers and BucksIPA. I will do more research on this and possibly check the Recipe Forum. Obvoiusly I'm at the bottom of the lager learning curve.
 

MrPowers

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2015
Messages
565
Reaction score
387
Thank you again Mr.Powers and BucksIPA. I will do more research on this and possibly check the Recipe Forum. Obvoiusly I'm at the bottom of the lager learning curve.
Lager brewing really isn't that much different than ale brewing. Just pitch a lot of yeast and ferment at about 50F. Your grain bill even looks ok to me. It wont be a true german/belgian pilsner, but I'm not sure thats what you're going for. If anything, I would drop the carapils, because I find that it doesn't really add anything. As is, it would make a nice american lager.
 
Top