Saison Old Country Ale (Lithuanian Farmhouse Ale)

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Sammy86

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Recipe Type
All Grain
Yeast
Omega Yeast Labs - Jovaru Lithuanian Farmhouse OYL-033
Yeast Starter
No
Batch Size (Gallons)
11
Original Gravity
1.054
Final Gravity
1.007
Boiling Time (Minutes)
60
IBU
25.5
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp)
14 Days at Garage Temp
For this recipe I took inspiration from my maternal Great-Grandparents. Unfortunately, I never had the opportunity to meet them however all of my family members spoke very highly of them. From my research, it appears the Lithuanians have a long and traditional brewing history where simplicity reins supreme. Unfortunately, I will not be pulling out part of the mash and baking it until golden brown and delicious this time around, maybe next time SWMBO is out of town. I will be brewing this next week after a very successful school year and high school baseball season (made it to the State Quarterfinals).

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Old Country Ale (Lithuanian Farmhouse Ale)
Author: Sammy

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: Saison
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 11 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 13.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.044
Efficiency: 72% (brew house)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 0.99

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.007
ABV (standard): 6.15%
IBU (tinseth): 25.5
SRM (daniels): 11.27
Mash pH: 5.4

FERMENTABLES:
20 lb - Pilsner Malt (87%)
3 lb - Munich Malt 40L (13%) (@bracconiere special)

HOPS:
1.5 oz - Hallertau Mittelfruh, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.75, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 10.13
1.5 oz - Hallertau Mittelfruh, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.75, Use: Boil for 30 min, IBU: 7.78
2 oz - Hallertau Mittelfruh, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.75, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 4.9
2 oz - Hallertau Mittelfruh, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.75, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 2.69

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Infusion, Temp: 144 F, Time: 45 min, Amount: 11 gal
2) Temperature, Temp: 160 F, Time: 30 min
3) Temperature, Temp: 168 F, Time: 10 min
4) Fly Sparge, Temp: 152 F, Amount: 6.5 gal
Starting Mash Thickness: 2 qt/lb

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
1.5 g - Calcium Chloride (dihydrate), Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
1.25 g - Epsom Salt, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
1.5 g - Gypsum, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
3.25 ml - Lactic acid, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
1 g - Salt, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash

YEAST:
Omega Yeast Labs - Jovaru Lithuanian Farmhouse OYL-033
Starter: No
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 85%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 70 - 95 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.75 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
Method: co2
CO2 Level: 3.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Balanced Profile
Ca2: 80
Mg2: 5
Na: 25
Cl: 75
SO4: 80
HCO3: 100
Water Notes:


This recipe has been published online at:
Lithuanian Farmhouse Ale | Saison All Grain Beer Recipe at Brewer's Friend

Generated by Brewer's Friend - Brewer's Friend | Homebrew Beer Recipes, Calculators & Forum
Date: 2021-06-11 00:52 UTC
Recipe Last Updated: 2021-06-11 00:49 UTC
 
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Sammy86

Sammy86

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Very cool. My grandfather came from Lithuania. I never met him either. If you want to bake part of your mash without upsetting your partner, consider using your grill.
Keep us posted on this recipe.
That is an excellent idea! I didn't even think of that. Maybe next time though...in all honesty I want to try the yeast and see how it goes.

To be honest, this beer is WAY out of my normal comfort zone. I'm looking forward to brewing it and trying it.
 

Miraculix

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I made on keptinis, or howrver it is called, with the baked mash and all. Nice ale! Don't fear the browning of the malt, it can take a lot of heat,I took mine too early or of the oven I guess. But the flavour was excellent.
 

madscientist451

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I tried the baked mash and it didn't do anything special for me. But I'm going to try a variation by making a wheat-rye unleavened bread, pulverize it and use the bread crumbs to replace 50% of the malt. Not sure if any farmhouse brewers actually did this but, from what I can tell from here, wheat and rye grow better in Latvia than barley so its likely farmhouse brewers used what was easiest to grow. Malted grain also took time to make or had to be purchased, so its likely anything to reduce that expense, like using un-malted rye and wheat flour. My hope is that the baked unleavened bread will provide a distinct flavor, something that I didn't get when I baked the mash in my first attempt. It was also a hassle to bake the gloppy mash, and it didn't really cook all the way through. Having a rainy weekend here, I may give it a try.
 
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Sammy86

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Brewed this up today! Uneventful brew day! Overshot my numbers, OG came in at 1.058. Oh well, it will be a higher ABV!

Pitched Jovaru at 75 and put it in the basement we'll see where we are at in a few days. I'll keep y'all posted!
 

DBhomebrew

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I used Mittlefrüh for the first time in my last beer. They sure do smell good. Kind of lost in this RIS, but I plan on using them in a kveik pale ale pretty soon.
 
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I used Mittlefrüh for the first time in my last beer. They sure do smell good. Kind of lost in this RIS, but I plan on using them in a kveik pale ale pretty soon.
Mittlefrüh is my absolute favorite noble hop! I use it mostly in my Pilsners and Bocks but i figured with the simplicity of and origin of the recipe i said why not.
 
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Sammy86

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Took a sample:

5499CE51-4A85-474F-B04C-194A562FE945.png


Jovaru is a beast! 1.005 and when I looked at the fermentor the yeast look like their still moving so I'm gonna give it a few more days and another check before cold crashing and kegging.

Sample tasted FANTASTIC!
 
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Sammy86

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First pint pulled of this beer and it is fantastic! The simplicity of it while also being yeast driven just makes me giddy!

If you like saisons, give this a try!

B192F08F-3B92-4E9D-A301-9BC332FFDBEA.jpeg


 

Gusso

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I recently used Jovaru for the first time. I used 12# Maris Otter and 2# rye malt in a 5 gallon batch. Finished dry at 1.003 and a 9% abv. Tastes great.
 
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Sammy86

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Update:

This beer is still hazy, even after being hit with gelatin and lagering for 2 weeks. The taste is fantastic and so unique. I've never had anything like it. It's citrus, clove, floral, sweet orange, slight banana type flavor and a hint of black pepper at the end. This is fantastic and I'm very happy with it!

Which leads me to my next point. Next summer I'm going to take it a step further. I recently read an article HERE that discussed the brewery where Jovaru originated. In case you don't go read the article basically the brewery does a raw ale adds a hop tea and ferments at 85º. Next summer this is going down. I'm very excited to try the brewing technique and see what I can make.
 

ThatVideoKid

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Great looking beer! No worries on not doing the mash baking as it appears you've seen from the Jovaru blog post. Several styles of Lithuanian beer exist!

Keptinis doesn't use that saison-ish style of yeast it seems anyway. They seem to be using english yeasts for the most part, though lars did find someone with their own yeast. It was still a fruity non-phenolic strain though. Its available from The Yeast Bay.
 

Protos

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Unfortunately, I will not be pulling out part of the mash and baking it until golden brown and delicious
Similar (although not exactly the same) effect could be achieved by using 2 to 4 percents of Fermented Rye Malt, I think. I have used it in some Nordic beers and it was good in small quantities, giving beer a dark-baked bread crust note.
I remember some German Roggenbier recipes suggesting specifically Lithuanian Fermented Rye Malt, so it seems to be an ingredient authentic to the country.
 

Northern_Brewer

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Keptinis doesn't use that saison-ish style of yeast it seems anyway. They seem to be using english yeasts for the most part, though lars did find someone with their own yeast. It was still a fruity non-phenolic strain though. Its available from The Yeast Bay.
I thought Simonaitis was meant to be POF+, although its levels of phenolics can be variable. Eg Escarpment, who work most closely with Lars.
 

Drebin

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Does this typically need yeast nutrient to start taking off?
 
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