OK, so a question that I am wondering

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redrocker652002

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Next week, my plan is to do a blonde ale with no dry hops. Basically, 1/2 ounce of bittering and 2 ounces of later boil hops for flavor and aroma. My thought is, get ingredients to do another beer so that when I either bottle or keg the blonde, I can use the yeast, probably BRY 97, for a pale ale or something of that nature. Thoughts? it will be in the bucket fermenter and I will probably use it the next day, so I will have the bucket sit in my ferm fridge at the 66 or so that I fermed the blonde at. It would be a day or so sitting, so I don't think that is going to be a big deal, but wanted to ask the experts. Thoughts?

And for full disclosure I will be posting this on another forum as well.
 
As I sit here sipping a heavily dry hopped neipa, that plan makes me feel sad for that first beer :(
Is the concern that dry-hopping the first beer will leave too much character in the yeasty trub for the second beer?
Maybe use a hop that isn't particularly pungent on the first brew and do something bold with the second?

Cheers!
 
I've reused yeast that has been sitting a day or so sealed up in the fermenter more than once.
Gonna take a little planning on my part, but I want to try and see if I can pull it off and see how it goes. Half the fun in this hobby is seeing what happens when I work outside my comfort zone, so to speak .
 
As I sit here sipping a heavily dry hopped neipa, that plan makes me feel sad for that first beer :(
Is the concern that dry-hopping the first beer will leave too much character in the yeasty trub for the second beer?
Maybe use a hop that isn't particularly pungent on the first brew and do something bold with the second?

Cheers!
Not at all. This is just what was going to be my next beer anyway, so I thought it would be fun to try and reuse the yeast. My question is just in the line of, will the yeast be ok with a very mellow first beer to handle a bit of a hoppier second beer. Nothing more, nothing less.
 
Next week, my plan is to do a blonde ale with no dry hops. Basically, 1/2 ounce of bittering and 2 ounces of later boil hops for flavor and aroma. My thought is, get ingredients to do another beer so that when I either bottle or keg the blonde, I can use the yeast, probably BRY 97, for a pale ale or something of that nature. Thoughts? it will be in the bucket fermenter and I will probably use it the next day, so I will have the bucket sit in my ferm fridge at the 66 or so that I fermed the blonde at. It would be a day or so sitting, so I don't think that is going to be a big deal, but wanted to ask the experts. Thoughts?

And for full disclosure I will be posting this on another forum as well.
Couple of days ago I kegged an Altbier. I have the fermenter sitting there with a litre or so of beer over it. Partly, I'm hoping to drink the beer, waiting to see if it clears enough after the disturbance. Mainly I'm keeping the yeast for a brew in the next few days. I won't use all of it. This is a Fermzilla though, I did a pressurised brew and closed transfer and releasing pressure to unscrew the yeast collector will waste the beer I'm trying to drink.
Usually, I would have sterilised a jam jar (or similar) in a pressure cooker, filled it with some of the yeast cake, put it in the fridge until I want to use it and cleaned the fermenter.
I'm not sure if you want to put the next beer onto the whole yeast cake or just put some of it in your next brew, possibly in a different fermenter. Either way, doing it the way you want to will be fine, very little risk but I wouldn't, personally, use the whole yeast cake because you don't need that much yeast and I wouldn't want to add all of the trub, dead yeast and other detritus from one brew into the next one.
 
Yes you can do that and people do it all the time. The sooner you can get the new wort into that fermenter the better. Also, as Denny Conn suggested in the AHA forum, the entire slurry is overkill. You only 1/2 to 1/3. You could spend that 24 hours that your fermenter will sit empty by splitting that slurry and sealing it in mason jars... using one for your new wort and refrigerate the remainder for a later brew.
 
Great suggestions. Thank you. I might split it as has been suggested and see how it goes. I am working on my timing and seeing if I can try and reuse the yeasts at least once just for the heck of it. Thanks to all who replied. I think half and half is the way to go.
 
Great suggestions. Thank you. I might split it as has been suggested and see how it goes. I am working on my timing and seeing if I can try and reuse the yeasts at least once just for the heck of it. Thanks to all who replied. I think half and half is the way to go.

I just did this. Well, I do it all the time, but I did just do it yesterday too. I buy American ale yeast once a year, German yeast once a year, and English ale yeast usually every year but not always, depending on my brewing schedule.

all I do when I rack my beer out of my fermentation bucket is take about 4 sanitized mason type jars and lids, and swirl up the yeast cake a bit and pour it into the jars. About 1/2 of a pint jar is enough for beers up to 1.060 or so, if done fairly soon. (Use a yeast pitching calculator for optimum results).

Each of those four jars is also reused and saved, placed in sanitized jars, labelled and put in the fridge.

So I buy a strain of yeast for all American ales once a year, since I make a lot of IPAs, pale ales, etc. It's very common, and I've been doing that for probably 20 years or so.
 
I just did this. Well, I do it all the time, but I did just do it yesterday too. I buy American ale yeast once a year, German yeast once a year, and English ale yeast usually every year but not always, depending on my brewing schedule.

all I do when I rack my beer out of my fermentation bucket is take about 4 sanitized mason type jars and lids, and swirl up the yeast cake a bit and pour it into the jars. About 1/2 of a pint jar is enough for beers up to 1.060 or so, if done fairly soon. (Use a yeast pitching calculator for optimum results).

Each of those four jars is also reused and saved, placed in sanitized jars, labelled and put in the fridge.

So I buy a strain of yeast for all American ales once a year, since I make a lot of IPAs, pale ales, etc. It's very common, and I've been doing that for probably 20 years or so.
Awesome. I actually tried that, but the fridge I stored the yeast jars in decided to turn off and it was very hot in the spot it was in. So I dumped them. I am going to try and store them again and work on my skills making a starter. I only tried once and it failed probably due to my error somewhere. Thanks for the reply
 
The only thing I will add is try to limit the amount of trub from the boil kettle into the fermenter when you brew. Clean wort will help you mainly just pass along yeast to future batches.
I have been trying to work on that. I bought a bucket strainer for my fermenter bucket and have a banjo strainer in the kettle. Great suggestion though, thank you
 
I just did a 10 gallon batch in a 14 gallon, valveless fermenter. My closed transfer is accomplished with a floating dip tube in the fermenter. I shut off the flow as soon as I start to see any debris coming through the line. However, that can leave as much as a couple quarts of beer in the fermenter.
After getting my kegs squared away, I swirl all the leftover beer, yeast, and trub and pour into sanitized glass one-gallon jugs and put them in the fridge. After a day of this “cold crashing”/settling, I pour off the beer into my 1-½ gallon keg and hook it up to my tank for force carbonation.
While the kegs are naturally carbonating and maturing, I can partake of this small amount of so-so beer while anticipating the better stuff.

I also recover the yeast from the gallon jugs and refrigerate for a few more runs.
These are just some of the games I play in order to try to convince myself that I’m not being wasteful and actually saving money. 🤣
 

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