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Clarke

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I have read a few threads on this but I am not clear.

I have Old Fashion Whole Grain Rolled Oats, that I eat for breakfast almost everyday.

I am confused what is what and which is which. If I use these oats in my stout do I need to cook them first as if I was about to eat them? Then add them to my mash?

Thanks
 

kevinb

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Nope. In my Oatmeal stout I just them right in.
 
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Clarke

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awesome, thanks guys
 

HopSong

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My understanding is that regular rolled oats need to be cooked first. Quick oats do not. I've only used quick oats. I remember asking Yooper about this in the past. You might check with her. Also, I'm positive I've read it in one of the brewing books. Whole grain steel cut oats definitely have to be cooked first.
 
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Clarke

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Ah, rats

I should have cooked them first, I didn’t, I just added them to the mash. I was using “Old Fashion Whole Grain Rolled Oats”.

oh well, next time

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mrmop520

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From what i understand, the old fashioned oats are rolled, and therefore mashable without cooking them before. It might be wise to crush them up if they're not the instant or minute oats.
 

janisco

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I think you should be fine. As I understand it, the key is that the oats you used were rolled, which means they have been de-husked and steamed and rolled into flakes (or pre gelatinized).
 
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Clarke

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I think I will be fine too... I am not too bothered by this or that. I was just looking for a clear answer which still seems to be hard to find.

Next time I will cook them and see if I can tell a difference, or just by instant for the sake of brewing. I bet it will still taste like beer...

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Natdavis777

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Yes, sort of. If you're using quick oats, or instant oats, no need to cook them. If you're using old fashioned oats, or steel cut oats, they should be cooked first.

+1

My last oatmeal stout, I added whole oats without cooking, and the beer didn't come out as I had hoped. Some research later, I found I should have cooked them first, then add to the mash. They need the starches gelatinized first. This process is ready competed in instant oats



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Clarke

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yeah, I am still unclear, I gave the exact oats I was using "Old Fashion Whole Grain Rolled Oats" I got two post say just add it to the mash and the rest seem to say use this oat or that oat, when all I wanted to know was are the oats I am currently using "Old Fashion Whole Grain Rolled Oats" need to be cooked or not.

They are Old Fashion which seem to say cook them but they are also Rolled which seem to say no need to cook them. Either way I am still unclear.
 

Yooper

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yeah, I am still unclear, I gave the exact oats I was using "Old Fashion Whole Grain Rolled Oats" I got two post say just add it to the mash and the rest seem to say use this oat or that oat, when all I wanted to know was are the oats I am currently using "Old Fashion Whole Grain Rolled Oats" need to be cooked or not.

They are Old Fashion which seem to say cook them but they are also Rolled which seem to say no need to cook them. Either way I am still unclear.
I cook them. A cereal mash is great, but even just cooking them will gelatinize them.

Rolled oats have part of the work done, but not all.

From "How To Brew":
12.2 Other Grains and Adjuncts
Oatmeal 1 L Oats are wonderful in a porter or stout. Oatmeal lends a smooth, silky mouthfeel and a creaminess to a stout that must be tasted to be understood. Oats are available whole, steel-cut (i.e. grits), rolled, and flaked. Rolled and flaked oats have had their starches gelatinized (made soluble) by heat and pressure, and are most readily available as "Instant Oatmeal" in the grocery store. Whole oats and "Old Fashioned Rolled Oats" have not had the degree of gelatinization that Instant have had and must be cooked before adding to the mash. "Quick" oatmeal has had a degree of gelatinization but does benefit from being cooked before adding to the mash. Cook according to the directions on the box (but add more water) to ensure that the starches will be fully utilized. Use 0.5-1.5 lb. per 5 gal batch. Oats need to be mashed with barley malt (and its enzymes) for conversion.
 

janisco

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Palmer's advice is a little confusing to me then. You can see from this graphic that old fashioned oats are in fact steamed and rolled into flakes. In order to steam even a steel cut oat, I would think the temperature would be well over the gelatinization temperate of oats in order to flatten it out or to roll it. It seems to me the cereal mash has been done for us during the rolling/steaming process? From the information below that I randomly found online, it appears the steaming is done at 215 degrees.

North American Millers’ Association (NAMA) on how they mill their oats: (http://www.namamillers.org/education/oat-milling-process/)

“In the conditioning process, moisture content is increased before the groats pass through a kiln where they are heated using dry heat radiators to a temperature of approximately 215 degrees F. During the heating process, steam inactivates enzymes present in raw grain, the groats are given a roasted nutty flavor, starch gelatinization occurs, and moisture level is reduced to a point acceptable for product storage. Adjustments are made to the conditioning system depending on the desired finished product characteristics.”


 
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Clarke

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Thanks for this post.

From Yoopers post there is a difference between "Rolled" oats and Old Fashion "Rolled" oats....

Rolled oats and flaked oat are instant, when old fashion rolled is not quite there yet, per your post above.

I am starting to see the difference, I think

I should have cooked my oats.
 

krackin

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As I understand it, starch in oats will gelatinize starting at 126* and finishing at147*F. Step mash for any cut should work. I would kind of wonder about the efficiency of a 152* mash on thick steel cut oats but old fashioned style rolled maybe OK. FWIW, I cook them.
 
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