Quantcast

O.G / F.G. Question

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

howardbeach

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2009
Messages
15
Reaction score
1
I brewed my first batch this week-end. Although I didn't see much bubbling through the airlock, the room smelled like baking bread when I came down in the morning so something must be happening. My O.G. was 1.110 before pitching the yeast. I'm brewing a belgian dark ale. When I check the specific gravity after a week, where should it be? I'm planning on using a secondary fermenter for an additional 2 weeks.
 

Hophazard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2009
Messages
185
Reaction score
1
Location
San Francisco
It should depend on the attenuation rate of the yeast. If the yeast you used attenuates at 75%, then I believe your FG should be around 1.027. The yeast packet should state the rate, or I'm sure you could find it on the web. I'll let others correct me if I'm wrong or if my numbers are off.

By the way, that's going to be a strong one!
 

llazy_llama

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
2,832
Reaction score
92
Location
Rapid City, South Dakota
Deleted my original post, I think I must have smoked some crack this morning or something... head's not where it should be. Hophazard has the right answer.

OG 1.110? Holy hell, that's huge. I hope you either made a big starter or at least pitched a few packets/vials of yeast.
 

Hophazard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2009
Messages
185
Reaction score
1
Location
San Francisco
I realized I short-handed the calculation above. In case you don't have beersmith (or similar program), you can figure out what your FG should be by multiplying the gravity (110 for yours) by the attentuation rate of the yeast (75% in my example) and subtracting the result from your OG (110-82.5=27.5 or a specific final gravity of 1.027).
 

BarleyWater

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2007
Messages
2,199
Reaction score
28
Location
Elmhurst
1.110!?!?!? Good lord, that's high OG. If you have never made a high gravity beer before, let alone any beer, you will be lucky to get to 1.027 or anything near it. Are you sure you measured correctly? What was the recipe and the yeast strain used?
 

homebrewer_99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
19,578
Reaction score
1,193
Location
I-80, Exit 27 (near the Quad Cities)
This MUST be a double post because I KNOW I replied to this one already...or....am I in the Twilight Zone???:drunk:

IMO, there's NO WAY your brew could ferment down from 111 in a few days.

My last reply asked you if you had taken a proper reading...plus that I made a mead at 114 with over 13 lbs of honey.
 
OP
H

howardbeach

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2009
Messages
15
Reaction score
1
Sorry for the double post. Anyway, I looked at my hydrometer and oops, I posted the balling number (whatever that is), not the SG number. My OG was 1.040. Does this sound more realistic?
 

peepfoot

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
most definitely. 1040, you should be fine. I started a continental pilsner that had an OG of 1.050, and I'm looking for a light, but packing an alright punch ale. Fermentation (with German ale yeast*liquid*) enough for airlock activity happened between 12 and 14 hours. It's been going nice so far. The constant temp is 78-81*F which I know is high, but that's all I have right now.

You should be just fine. enjoy!
 
Top