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Now That's a Pilot

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z987k

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Not really enough information there to say much. First we need to know why the engines died. Look for the NTSB report on that in like oh 2 years. Important thing is everyone's alive with minimal damage.

On the other thing linked... I can't remember almost anything about this other accident except slipping in large aircraft is not recommended. We read over the report, what happened was the pilot put in a slip, and the side forces on the wing mounted engines tore the engines off the wings.
 
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I agree...not enough info to make any sort of determination.

I know a guy who thought he was a hero when he landed safely after losing an engine shortly into a trans-Atlantic flight...until he realized he accidentally actuated a fuel cutoff switch and CAUSED the situation in the first place.

Like z, I'm just glad everyone's safe.
 

z987k

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Yuri_Rage said:
I know a guy who thought he was a hero when he landed safely after losing an engine shortly into a trans-Atlantic flight...until he realized he accidentally actuated a fuel cutoff switch and CAUSED the situation in the first place.
That's mainly why I said we don't have enough info. Not enough fuel for the trip, checklist item (fuel pump?) skipped? For both engines to die simultaneously is very rare without fuel starvation.


Here's one for you, can't remember the name of the flight, but it's a lear35 ferry flight doubling as a checkride. Left seat is first officer right is examiner. On takeoff examiner pulls one engine to simulate a engine failure on takeoff. As that happens the other engine actually goes. How about some bad luck that day.
 
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