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PHXCobra

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This is my first beer I've kegged so forgive my ignorance. I brewed the Lemon-Lime Hefe in the recipe section. It sat at 30psi in the fridge for a 8-9 days. Vented it and lowered it down to 5-6 psi to serve. All I get is foam!!! I have 5 feet of hose leading to picnic tap. Help!
 

Beer-lord

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30psi for that long is WAYYYYY too much and too long. Try 10 psi for 7-10 days.
For now, I'd remove it from C02 and purge whats in it and leave it alone for a day or two before releasing more gas. Then you can connect it back to pouring temps.

Re-reading this, I want to be sure I understand what you did. Did you leave it set it to 30 psi and leave it connected for 8-9 days or just hit it with 30 psi then disconnected it and let it sit for 8-9 days?
 

HumulusHead

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I'm guessing it's a bit over carbed... Which isn't a problem. You will just need to bleed it off until it's carbed right.

I usually do the set n forget method. I set mine at 10-12 psi and let it sit for as long as you did at thirty and I have full carbed beer by then


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NathPowe

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By holding it at 30psi for 8 or 9 days you've over-carbonated this beer.... quite a bit. For future reference, consult a carbonation chart to figure out how to get your carbonation where you want it. You'll need to know the temperature your kegerator keeps the beer at and your target volume of CO2. Then set the regulator to the pressure the chart indicates.

Typically when people force carb using 30psi on cold beer, they do so for 24-48 hours. This gives you a 'jump' on carbonation. The pressure is then reduced to the serving pressure (often 10-14psi) that will keep the beer at the level of carb you want (see the chart).

To fix the over-carbonation you'll need to unhook it from the gas and repeatedly use the pressure release valve on your keg to vent the excess CO2. I've never really done this before, so I'm sure someone else will chime in with more exact info on how much, but I imagine it's going to take quite a bit of venting to fix the over-carbonation.

Also, next time you're at the LHBS you might pick up 10ft of 3/16 beer line to replace the 5ft you've got going. Longer lines can also help to reduce foaming.

Have patience and good luck man. Cheers.
 

raouliii

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....It sat at 30psi in the fridge for a 8-9 days.....
:eek:
IMO:That's about 6-7 days too long.
That 5feet of hose will need to be at least doubled.
I recommend venting the keg a each hour or so for a couple days, to de-gas it.
It's best to establish carb level/pressure and serving pressure to the same pressure. Then establish a hose length for that pressure. Carbing high and serving low will just cause heartache.
 
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