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I have my Marris Otter Smash in my keezer at 40°F. 10ft 3/16 line at 12 psi.
My tap box isn't cooled yet so i pour off the first ounce for taste issues.

WEll after that I get a GREAT 1inch head pour into my pint glass. well after that when I pour I get about 2 inches of beer and the rest foam. It's weird. Usually this is the other way around. I'm going to try and turn my serving pressure down but would like to leave it as it keeps my beer at a good carb level.

i usually only drink 2-3 a night. It's not the best beer I've made. i'm basically drinking it cause it's there. Not bad enough to dump, but I'd buy BL over it in a store!
 

conpewter

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I had a similar issue when I had an infection in my keg, caused it to overcarb (and started to taste crappier the more time passed). You also might want to look into Bev-Seal tubing, it has a PET lining so you don't have to pour off the first ounce.
 

BierMuncher

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How is your line routed?

I found that if I had a bunch of up's and down's in my lines, CO2 bubble would form at the up's of the hose after a 10-12 minute delay between draws and that would cause foaming.

High serving pressure exacerbates the problem.

Two choices:

Dangle your hose so you have a minimum of those "up" pockets where CO2 can gather.
Plan on drawing off 1-2 ounces for every pint.
 
OP
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I had a similar issue when I had an infection in my keg, caused it to overcarb (and started to taste crappier the more time passed). You also might want to look into Bev-Seal tubing, it has a PET lining so you don't have to pour off the first ounce.
I'm really hoping it's not infected. It has a small bad taste, but I don't think it's from a keg infection, just a bad brew. it doesn't seem to be getting worse either.

How is your line routed?

I found that if I had a bunch of up's and down's in my lines, CO2 bubble would form at the up's of the hose after a 10-12 minute delay between draws and that would cause foaming.

High serving pressure exacerbates the problem.

Two choices:

Dangle your hose so you have a minimum of those "up" pockets where CO2 can gather.
Plan on drawing off 1-2 ounces for every pint.
my hoses are basically just tossed in the chest freezer. No routing as of yet. It isn't COMPLETE, but I do a little to it between kegs.

After I kick this keg, I plan on installing my fan to route air through my tap box and also install a hose routing option. I am thinking of switching hose too. I'm just using Lowes Hose.
 

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