New England IPA "Northeast" style IPA

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Clyde McCoy

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wouldn't normally post photos of hop pellets (lol) but these smell & look super good -

Citra LM

1647818747705.jpeg


Cryo Pop

1647818795167.jpeg


bittered with hop extract and used 4.5 oz Cryo Pop in whirl, 8 oz Citra LM in dry hop
 

Noob_Brewer

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Haven’t posted a beer here in a while due to 3 month intermission in brewing. But just kegged this today and this is force carbed leftover sample. Double NEIPA with Waimea, Citra, Nectaron, and Nelson. VERY promising. Well balanced and extremely smooth. Altered my grain bill a bit and more orange color than my norm. Poor lighting. Great mouthfeel. Solid smooth bitterness, sweet mango/stone fruit/white wine with a little NZ spice on the end that I love. Aroma is Hop Fresh out of the bag. Would never know it’s 8.3%. Looking forward to when the keg is fully carbed.

9234B2E9-1561-4B87-ACA9-972C32E9A727.jpeg
BDB95201-60F2-4496-A8F8-7AC293DF2E86.jpeg
 

aaronm13

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Haven’t posted a beer here in a while due to 3 month intermission in brewing. But just kegged this today and this is force carbed leftover sample. Double NEIPA with Waimea, Citra, Nectaron, and Nelson. VERY promising. Well balanced and extremely smooth. Altered my grain bill a bit and more orange color than my norm. Poor lighting. Great mouthfeel. Solid smooth bitterness, sweet mango/stone fruit/white wine with a little NZ spice on the end that I love. Aroma is Hop Fresh out of the bag. Would never know it’s 8.3%. Looking forward to when the keg is fully carbed.

View attachment 763565 View attachment 763566
Looks great and love the sound of the hop combination. Any chance you could post the grain and hop bill?
 

Noob_Brewer

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Looks great and love the sound of the hop combination. Any chance you could post the grain and hop bill?
Sure, the grain bill was a little bit more complicated than it needed to be but since this was only the second brew in 3 months for me and I hadn't ordered anything, I did a bit more mixing and matching lol.

Grains: (beersmith SRM was 5.6 where Im usually in the mid-high 4s)
37% 2-row
29% Golden promise
16% spelt
11% malted oats
4% carafoam
3% carahell

Hops:
Boil: Waimea @ 15min, 10min for 0.5oz each, Waimea and Citra @ 5min for 0.25oz each
WP: 45min @155F - Waimea 1.25oz, Nelson 1.00oz, Nectaron 1.75oz
DH1: Nectaron 2.00oz, Nelson 2.00oz, Citra Lupomax 1.0oz
DH2: Nectaron 3.00oz, Nelson 1.00oz, Citra Lupomax 1.0oz

I do my DHs after fermentation done and soft crashing, DH at 54F for both 24hrs apart, Hard crash to 38F ~20hrs after the second DH. I kegged about 4days post first DH.

I LOVE Waimea for hot side. great alpha acids but great flavor as well so thought it would be great candidate for late boil and no 60min addition. Beersmith calculated my IBUs at 45.6. I also have typically more balance between the boil, WP, and DH but this worked very well. Excited to taste this after its carbed and conditioned after a week but the force carbed sample on keg day was very good.
 

secretlevel

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Hey y'all, sorry if you saw me share this experiment on my Instagram or Reddit, but I know not everyone is on those so I'll share it on here as well. After all, this is the thread that taught me most of my techniques and methods and inspired this experiment :)

So two friends and I brewed up a 15 gallon batch of an experimental NEIPA that was split 3 ways. The wort itself was the same, as was the yeast, but this is where the similarities ended. Each of us used the same varieties and amounts of hops, but added them at different intervals.

Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) - this is the beer that followed original Tuba Solo recipe (from CB&B mag). 2oz Galaxy during late fermentation stages (1.028), then D-rest and cold crash to 53F before adding the rest of the hops.

Beer #2 (Late Fermentation Dry Hop) - this is the beer with 100% of hops added in the last couple of points of fermentation at 70F.

Beer #3 (Post Fermentation Dry Hop) - this is the beer with 100% of hops added after the fermentation has finished, yeast was dropped out, and hops added at 53F.

Beer #1 (MDH)Beer #2 (LFDH)Beer #3 (PFDH)
Mid-fermentation2oz Galaxy @ Day 5
Late fermentation3oz Galaxy, 2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic and 1oz Citra on Day 10
Post-fermentation2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic, 1oz Citra, 1oz Galaxy @ Day 103oz Galaxy, 2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic and 1oz Citra on Day 10

When these beers were carbonated, our homebrew club evaluated them and submitted a total of 28 sheets based on 4 categories, then the scores were averaged. The categories were Aroma, Flavor, Aftertaste and Body/Mouthfeel.

Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) was the decided winner by average. It received 71.93% of total points, whereas the other two received 67.14% and 66.86%, respectively. This is more than a 7% difference between #2 (LFDH) and #3 (PFDH) compared to Beer #1.

While Beer #1 had the most comments complementing aroma, Beer #2 had the higher average in the Aftertaste category - I'm assuming this is due to slightly less hop burn as there were quite a few "hop burn" and "bitterness" comments on these beers. Admittedly, these beers were very fresh when they were served for the club (9 days after the dry hop). After another week, they all mellowed out significantly.


Beer #1 (MDH)Beer #2 (LFDH)Beer #3 (PFDH)
Aroma8.467.216.61
Flavor20.4318.6418.68
Aftertaste13.1413.5013.21
Body/Mouthfeel21.5419.6120.25
Total71.9367.1466.86


What We Learned
  1. Adding some hops toward the tail end of fermentation had a positive impact on flavor and aroma, however, adding the majority of hops post-fermentation at cooler temperatures helps avoid most of the hop burn.
  2. Galaxy is probably the #1 hop contributing to hop burn. I have been using the "cold crash to 53F, then dry hop" method for over a year now, and I have never experienced hop burn like this, or never at all with this process. All 3 of our beers received comments of astringent or "burny" aftertaste, but my beer (#3) received the bulk majority of those comments - 6 mentions in the comments. It's also worth noting that I had used a different bag of hops than the two other beers, which had 14.6% AA, whereas theirs only had 12.6% AA, which explains why their beers were much less astringent.
  3. Interestingly enough, Beer #1 was the only beer that got a Double Dry Hop, so this could have very well been a factor in it winning. I'm hoping to experiment with DDH a little more in the near future.
I wrote up a blog with the entire recipe, pics, data and everything if you're interested: dry hopping schedule experiment.

20170102042857_IMG_1175_2.JPG

club-wort-tasting.jpg


PS. This recipe was bonkers with 8oz Citra going into Whirlpool for 5 gallons and the beers all came out delicious. We placed in Top 3 at Drunk Monk with all 3 of our entries lol...
 
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Northern_Brewer

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Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) was the decided winner by average. It received 71.93% of total points, whereas the other two received 67.14% and 66.86%, respectively. This is more than a 7% difference between #2 (LFDH) and #3 (PFDH) compared to Beer #1.

Reminiscent of the public experiment that Cloudwater did in 2016 with their DIPA v4 (double-hopped during fermentation) and v5 (double-hopped after fermentation) :


Broadly a quarter preferred v4, a quarter preferred v5 and half preferred a blend of the two.
 

murphyslaw

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Thanks for sharing this. Very interesting. Your results are somewhat surprising to me. #1 seems to resemble the process many of us were using 2-3 years ago and #3 looks more similar to current methods.


What We Learned
  1. Adding some hops toward the tail end of fermentation had a positive impact on flavor and aroma, however, adding the majority of hops post-fermentation at cooler temperatures helps avoid most of the hop burn.


Maybe I'm misreading this, but wasn't #2 the only one with late fermentation hops and the one that scored the lowest on flavor? And #3, with all the hops post-fermentation at cool temps, had the most mentions of bitterness, bad aftertaste or hop burn, according to the blog post?
 

marc1

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Hey y'all, sorry if you saw me share this experiment on my Instagram or Reddit, but I know not everyone is on those so I'll share it on here as well. After all, this is the thread that taught me most of my techniques and methods and inspired this experiment :)

So two friends and I brewed up a 15 gallon batch of an experimental NEIPA that was split 3 ways. The wort itself was the same, as was the yeast, but this is where the similarities ended. Each of us used the same varieties and amounts of hops, but added them at different intervals.

Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) - this is the beer that followed original Tuba Solo recipe (from CB&B mag). 2oz Galaxy during late fermentation stages (1.028), then D-rest and cold crash to 53F before adding the rest of the hops.

Beer #2 (Late Fermentation Dry Hop) - this is the beer with 100% of hops added in the last couple of points of fermentation at 70F.

Beer #3 (Post Fermentation Dry Hop) - this is the beer with 100% of hops added after the fermentation has finished, yeast was dropped out, and hops added at 53F.

Beer #1 (MDH)Beer #2 (LFDH)Beer #3 (PFDH)
Mid-fermentation2oz Galaxy @ Day 5
Late fermentation3oz Galaxy, 2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic and 1oz Citra on Day 10
Post-fermentation2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic, 1oz Citra, 1oz Galaxy @ Day 103oz Galaxy, 2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic and 1oz Citra on Day 10

When these beers were carbonated, our homebrew club evaluated them and submitted a total of 28 sheets based on 4 categories, then the scores were averaged. The categories were Aroma, Flavor, Aftertaste and Body/Mouthfeel.

Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) was the decided winner by average. It received 71.93% of total points, whereas the other two received 67.14% and 66.86%, respectively. This is more than a 7% difference between #2 (LFDH) and #3 (PFDH) compared to Beer #1.

While Beer #1 had the most comments complementing aroma, Beer #2 had the higher average in the Aftertaste category - I'm assuming this is due to slightly less hop burn as there were quite a few "hop burn" and "bitterness" comments on these beers. Admittedly, these beers were very fresh when they were served for the club (9 days after the dry hop). After another week, they all mellowed out significantly.


Beer #1 (MDH)Beer #2 (LFDH)Beer #3 (PFDH)
Aroma8.467.216.61
Flavor20.4318.6418.68
Aftertaste13.1413.5013.21
Body/Mouthfeel21.5419.6120.25
Total71.9367.1466.86


What We Learned
  1. Adding some hops toward the tail end of fermentation had a positive impact on flavor and aroma, however, adding the majority of hops post-fermentation at cooler temperatures helps avoid most of the hop burn.
  2. Galaxy is probably the #1 hop contributing to hop burn. I have been using the "cold crash to 53F, then dry hop" method for over a year now, and I have never experienced hop burn like this, or never at all with this process. All 3 of our beers received comments of astringent or "burny" aftertaste, but my beer (#3) received the bulk majority of those comments - 6 mentions in the comments. It's also worth noting that I had used a different bag of hops than the two other beers, which had 14.6% AA, whereas theirs only had 12.6% AA, which explains why their beers were much less astringent.
  3. Interestingly enough, Beer #1 was the only beer that got a Double Dry Hop, so this could have very well been a factor in it winning. I'm hoping to experiment with DDH a little more in the near future.
I wrote up a blog with the entire recipe, pics, data and everything if you're interested: dry hopping schedule experiment.

PS. This recipe was bonkers with 8oz Citra going into Whirlpool for 5 gallons and the beers all came out delicious. We placed in Top 3 at Drunk Monk with all 3 of our entries lol...

What were the Standard Deviations and/or Standard Errors for all of the scores?
 

secretlevel

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Maybe I'm misreading this, but wasn't #2 the only one with late fermentation hops and the one that scored the lowest on flavor? And #3, with all the hops post-fermentation at cool temps, had the most mentions of bitterness, bad aftertaste or hop burn, according to the blog post?

You're right, I considered Beer #3 a bit of an odd ball in this situation since the Galaxy used there was 2 percentage points higher and likely contributed to hop burn more than anything else. For this bulletpoint, I'm mostly comparing #1 and #2.

Especially since I have had zero issues with hop burn in the past year of using method that Beer #3 utilized, I'm confident that a different lot of Galaxy or a different hop would have lead to a different outcome. What would you conclude from the experiment?

What were the Standard Deviations and/or Standard Errors for all of the scores?

Just threw this into a calculator for ya:

Overall Standard Deviation s = 18.055232
#1. s = 17.8
#2. s = 17.7
#3. s = 18.8

You can tell that Beer #3 was very polarizing. Folks either loved it or hated it.
 

Andre3000

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@secretlevel awesome thanks for sharing!

I'm curious as to whether or not you think hop creep affected this experiment. I've shifted my methods more towards #3 to avoid it, but maybe hop creep isn't a bad thing if you plan for it. Seems like in order of most affected to least affected it would go #2, #1, followed by #3.
 

marc1

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Just threw this into a calculator for ya:

Overall Standard Deviation s = 18.055232
#1. s = 17.8
#2. s = 17.7
#3. s = 18.8

You can tell that Beer #3 was very polarizing. Folks either loved it or hated it.

Sorry, I don't quite understand. Are you saying that the scores with 1 standard deviation were:

#1) 71.93 +/- 17.8
#2) 67.14 +/- 17.7
#3) 66.86 +/- 18.8

If that's the case, then individual results were all over the place!

Thanks for checking! :bigmug:
 

aaronm13

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Sure, the grain bill was a little bit more complicated than it needed to be but since this was only the second brew in 3 months for me and I hadn't ordered anything, I did a bit more mixing and matching lol.

Grains: (beersmith SRM was 5.6 where Im usually in the mid-high 4s)
37% 2-row
29% Golden promise
16% spelt
11% malted oats
4% carafoam
3% carahell

Hops:
Boil: Waimea @ 15min, 10min for 0.5oz each, Waimea and Citra @ 5min for 0.25oz each
WP: 45min @155F - Waimea 1.25oz, Nelson 1.00oz, Nectaron 1.75oz
DH1: Nectaron 2.00oz, Nelson 2.00oz, Citra Lupomax 1.0oz
DH2: Nectaron 3.00oz, Nelson 1.00oz, Citra Lupomax 1.0oz

I do my DHs after fermentation done and soft crashing, DH at 54F for both 24hrs apart, Hard crash to 38F ~20hrs after the second DH. I kegged about 4days post first DH.

I LOVE Waimea for hot side. great alpha acids but great flavor as well so thought it would be great candidate for late boil and no 60min addition. Beersmith calculated my IBUs at 45.6. I also have typically more balance between the boil, WP, and DH but this worked very well. Excited to taste this after its carbed and conditioned after a week but the force carbed sample on keg day was very good.
Thanks for that. Think I need to do one of those brews to use up all the bits of grain I have. Report back on it after it's had time to condition.
 

TBryerton

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Hey y'all, sorry if you saw me share this experiment on my Instagram or Reddit, but I know not everyone is on those so I'll share it on here as well. After all, this is the thread that taught me most of my techniques and methods and inspired this experiment :)

So two friends and I brewed up a 15 gallon batch of an experimental NEIPA that was split 3 ways. The wort itself was the same, as was the yeast, but this is where the similarities ended. Each of us used the same varieties and amounts of hops, but added them at different intervals.

Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) - this is the beer that followed original Tuba Solo recipe (from CB&B mag). 2oz Galaxy during late fermentation stages (1.028), then D-rest and cold crash to 53F before adding the rest of the hops.

Beer #2 (Late Fermentation Dry Hop) - this is the beer with 100% of hops added in the last couple of points of fermentation at 70F.

Beer #3 (Post Fermentation Dry Hop) - this is the beer with 100% of hops added after the fermentation has finished, yeast was dropped out, and hops added at 53F.

Beer #1 (MDH)Beer #2 (LFDH)Beer #3 (PFDH)
Mid-fermentation2oz Galaxy @ Day 5
Late fermentation3oz Galaxy, 2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic and 1oz Citra on Day 10
Post-fermentation2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic, 1oz Citra, 1oz Galaxy @ Day 103oz Galaxy, 2oz El Dorado, 2oz Mosaic and 1oz Citra on Day 10

When these beers were carbonated, our homebrew club evaluated them and submitted a total of 28 sheets based on 4 categories, then the scores were averaged. The categories were Aroma, Flavor, Aftertaste and Body/Mouthfeel.

Beer #1 (Mixed Dry Hop) was the decided winner by average. It received 71.93% of total points, whereas the other two received 67.14% and 66.86%, respectively. This is more than a 7% difference between #2 (LFDH) and #3 (PFDH) compared to Beer #1.

While Beer #1 had the most comments complementing aroma, Beer #2 had the higher average in the Aftertaste category - I'm assuming this is due to slightly less hop burn as there were quite a few "hop burn" and "bitterness" comments on these beers. Admittedly, these beers were very fresh when they were served for the club (9 days after the dry hop). After another week, they all mellowed out significantly.


Beer #1 (MDH)Beer #2 (LFDH)Beer #3 (PFDH)
Aroma8.467.216.61
Flavor20.4318.6418.68
Aftertaste13.1413.5013.21
Body/Mouthfeel21.5419.6120.25
Total71.9367.1466.86


What We Learned
  1. Adding some hops toward the tail end of fermentation had a positive impact on flavor and aroma, however, adding the majority of hops post-fermentation at cooler temperatures helps avoid most of the hop burn.
  2. Galaxy is probably the #1 hop contributing to hop burn. I have been using the "cold crash to 53F, then dry hop" method for over a year now, and I have never experienced hop burn like this, or never at all with this process. All 3 of our beers received comments of astringent or "burny" aftertaste, but my beer (#3) received the bulk majority of those comments - 6 mentions in the comments. It's also worth noting that I had used a different bag of hops than the two other beers, which had 14.6% AA, whereas theirs only had 12.6% AA, which explains why their beers were much less astringent.
  3. Interestingly enough, Beer #1 was the only beer that got a Double Dry Hop, so this could have very well been a factor in it winning. I'm hoping to experiment with DDH a little more in the near future.
I wrote up a blog with the entire recipe, pics, data and everything if you're interested: dry hopping schedule experiment.

View attachment 763697
View attachment 763695

PS. This recipe was bonkers with 8oz Citra going into Whirlpool for 5 gallons and the beers all came out delicious. We placed in Top 3 at Drunk Monk with all 3 of our entries lol...
Interesting, thanks for sharing. I did a DH during fermentation experiment by mistake recently. First time recipe attempt. Apparently my heater malfunctioned, probably sometime around peak fermentation, and the temp dropped into the 50’s. I didn’t realize exactly what happened at first, so I continued as I normally would. When I added DHs, the thing went into full bore fermentation again. It was a 100% Citra beer, and it was actually amazingly good. Juicy, mango citrus flavors that reminded me of JJJulius. Then it faded at the speed of light. Literally a week later it was trash.

Brewed the same exact beer, no malfunctions, replaced Citra with Mosaic.DH cold after soft crash. Not a great beer. But continually gets better as it sits in the keg.

Thought it was interesting.
 

secretlevel

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Sorry, I don't quite understand. Are you saying that the scores with 1 standard deviation were:

#1) 71.93 +/- 17.8
#2) 67.14 +/- 17.7
#3) 66.86 +/- 18.8

If that's the case, then individual results were all over the place!

Thanks for checking! :bigmug:

Definitely, people who rated the beers weren't all NEIPA fans, so their scores really varied. It also shows how different the beers were just because of the changes in the hops and the hop schedules.

@secretlevel awesome thanks for sharing!

I'm curious as to whether or not you think hop creep affected this experiment. I've shifted my methods more towards #3 to avoid it, but maybe hop creep isn't a bad thing if you plan for it. Seems like in order of most affected to least affected it would go #2, #1, followed by #3.

Absolutely! While Beers #1 and #3 finished at 1.023, Beer #2 finished at 1.021. It's possible that not all of our hydrometers are accurate to the point, but our OG's on the Tilts were within one point of each other.
 

Jimmy_Hops

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You're right, I considered Beer #3 a bit of an odd ball in this situation since the Galaxy used there was 2 percentage points higher and likely contributed to hop burn more than anything else. For this bulletpoint, I'm mostly comparing #1 and #2.

Especially since I have had zero issues with hop burn in the past year of using method that Beer #3 utilized, I'm confident that a different lot of Galaxy or a different hop would have lead to a different outcome. What would you conclude from the experiment?



Just threw this into a calculator for ya:

Overall Standard Deviation s = 18.055232
#1. s = 17.8
#2. s = 17.7
#3. s = 18.8

You can tell that Beer #3 was very polarizing. Folks either loved it or hated it.
I read through the blog, awesome job btw, and was curious what beer you liked best? I have been tempted to do something like #1 but have heard negative things about early dry hopping such as the beer not having stable haze and possibly creating more hop burn, but it looks like I’ll have to try it out on my next batch. Thanks for the info!
 

Rob2010SS

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Not to steer this off of the experiment that @secretlevel did an amazing job on but curious if someone can point me in the direction of a grain bill that will get me this kind of look...

neipa.jpg


My last two grain bills consisted of the following...

2 row
White Wheat
Malted Oats

and...

2 row
Pale Wheat
Flaked Oats
Honey Malt

Neither of those beers looked anything like this. I'm striving for that really faint opaque, orange glow. Any tips on what kind of grain bill will get me there?
 

marc1

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Definitely, people who rated the beers weren't all NEIPA fans, so their scores really varied. It also shows how different the beers were just because of the changes in the hops and the hop schedules.



Absolutely! While Beers #1 and #3 finished at 1.023, Beer #2 finished at 1.021. It's possible that not all of our hydrometers are accurate to the point, but our OG's on the Tilts were within one point of each other.

That was an awesome study! Given the variation in scores, I'm not sure we can say whether any particular hopping schedule would be repeatably higher scoring, but the qualitative feedback is excellent.

If you would be willing to share the raw data (a table of individual scores), I could visualize it with some good graphing software for you.
 

MMP126

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Not to steer this off of the experiment that @secretlevel did an amazing job on but curious if someone can point me in the direction of a grain bill that will get me this kind of look...

View attachment 763790

My last two grain bills consisted of the following...

2 row
White Wheat
Malted Oats

and...

2 row
Pale Wheat
Flaked Oats
Honey Malt

Neither of those beers looked anything like this. I'm striving for that really faint opaque, orange glow. Any tips on what kind of grain bill will get me there?

This looks extremely light to me... Like 2.5 to 3 SRM... 4 max. Also, photo lighting makes a huge difference in the photo, so that can be a huge factor in making that picture look really light. Where is the photo from?

What was the SRM on the above grain bills you made?

Mine below is 6.3. And your picrture looks a lot lighter.
58.1 - NEIPA 9.JPG
 

Rob2010SS

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This looks extremely light to me... Like 2.5 to 3 SRM... 4 max. Also, photo lighting makes a huge difference in the photo, so that can be a huge factor in making that picture look really light. Where is the photo from?

What was the SRM on the above grain bills you made?

Mine below is 6.3. And your picrture looks a lot lighter.
View attachment 763806

So, the one I listed as...

2 row
White Wheat
Malted Oats

...came out as 4 according to brewers friend. Pic below...
1.jpg



The one I listed as...

2 row
Pale Wheat
Flaked Oats
Honey

...came out as 4.7 according to Brewers Friend. Pic below...
2.jpg



The picture that I included in my last post was a beer called Oh, Alice and it's from Charles Towne Fermentory. I didn't take the picture and they don't list the SRM value of that but it looks amazing!

I do see what you mean about the lighting. Lighting can do wonders for pictures of these beers. The pictures I have in this post are in the same lighting and while not the same glass, the 2nd one is a sample glass, so not too much bigger than the hydrometer tube in the first pic.
 

Dgallo

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Not to steer this off of the experiment that @secretlevel did an amazing job on but curious if someone can point me in the direction of a grain bill that will get me this kind of look...

View attachment 763790

My last two grain bills consisted of the following...

2 row
White Wheat
Malted Oats

and...

2 row
Pale Wheat
Flaked Oats
Honey Malt

Neither of those beers looked anything like this. I'm striving for that really faint opaque, orange glow. Any tips on what kind of grain bill will get me there?
I use 3% honey malt when I want a slight orange color but you could really use any 25ish L grain
AC31F264-8464-458B-845D-25DB2099CA21.jpeg


This is almost same grainbill but minus the honey
652F5623-ABAD-42DA-9B96-D94EEB92427A.jpeg
 
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Rob2010SS

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Here is a link to a bunch of photos of that beer. Its really interesting take on how lighting affects things.


By the looks of it, you are not too far off with the first grain bill.
I see your point! A couple of those pictures look significantly more orange!! Makes me feel better about the color in that first one.
 

Rob2010SS

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Lighting and vessel are honestly everything. This is the same beer two days between pours s as bad different glasses

I use 3% honey malt when I want a slight orange color but you could really use any 25ish L grain View attachment 763822

This is almost same grainbill but minus the honeyView attachment 763824
This helps!! Thanks for the comparison.
 

murphyslaw

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I use 3% honey malt when I want a slight orange color but you could really use any 25ish L grain View attachment 763822

This is almost same grainbill but minus the honeyView attachment 763824

Thanks for sharing this. I planned to focus on color/appearance on my next few brews and would like to develop a base yellowish and a base orangish color. Do you happen to know roughly where these fall on the SRM scale in your software?
 

Dgallo

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Thanks for sharing this. I planned to focus on color/appearance on my next few brews and would like to develop a base yellowish and a base orangish color. Do you happen to know roughly where these fall on the SRM scale in your software?
The calculated for the first picture is 5.1 and the calculated for the second is 3.9. These estimated SRMs came from Bru’n water calculations
 

secretlevel

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I read through the blog, awesome job btw, and was curious what beer you liked best? I have been tempted to do something like #1 but have heard negative things about early dry hopping such as the beer not having stable haze and possibly creating more hop burn, but it looks like I’ll have to try it out on my next batch. Thanks for the info!

Thank you! We tried all 3 without knowing which one is which and I was on the edge between #1 and #3. I also liked #1 the best in the end, but it was pretty hard to tell them apart. They became more similar as all of the hop burn settled out and they conditioned. Fantastic beers either way.

I think you're ok adding a couple of oz during the last couple of points of fermentation without any adverse impact. I believe early fermentation DH additions have a much larger impact on haze, rather than later ones. I'd just avoid Galaxy or any super high AA hop for this purpose...
 

wepeeler

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Not to steer this off of the experiment that @secretlevel did an amazing job on but curious if someone can point me in the direction of a grain bill that will get me this kind of look...

View attachment 763790

My last two grain bills consisted of the following...

2 row
White Wheat
Malted Oats

and...

2 row
Pale Wheat
Flaked Oats
Honey Malt

Neither of those beers looked anything like this. I'm striving for that really faint opaque, orange glow. Any tips on what kind of grain bill will get me there?
That super light color appears even lighter in the photo due to extra light shining right on the glass. I've had neipas in that range before. 2 Row, White wheat, Flaked Oats: 65%, 20% 15%. Kind of boring grain flavor to be honest. Let's the hops shine, but I prefer a slightly darker color, say more orange. @Dgallo gets good results with a small amount of honey malt.

I've recently switched to Mecca Grade 2 Row and White Wheat with some carafoam, and that gets me a nice deep orange. I feel it doesn't oxidize as fast either. I'd like to say it has a more complex grain flavor as well, but I don't have anything to measure, except my brain. And that might not be the best indicator lol.
 

BeerFst

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That super light color appears even lighter in the photo due to extra light shining right on the glass. I've had neipas in that range before. 2 Row, White wheat, Flaked Oats: 65%, 20% 15%. Kind of boring grain flavor to be honest. Let's the hops shine, but I prefer a slightly darker color, say more orange. @Dgallo gets good results with a small amount of honey malt.

I've recently switched to Mecca Grade 2 Row and White Wheat with some carafoam, and that gets me a nice deep orange. I feel it doesn't oxidize as fast either. I'd like to say it has a more complex grain flavor as well, but I don't have anything to measure, except my brain. And that might not be the best indicator lol.
Flaked oats have higher manganese content which speeds the oxidation reactions. Maybe that's not the exact scientific method, but Mn definitely makes it worse. It is a big reason why many have switched to oat malt or GNO (basically oat crystal) as these have lower Mn content. I do think Flaked oats still have their place, but your observations are in line previously posted articles.

I swore Janish wrote about this, maybe it was in the book, I couldnt find it on his blog. Actually I just found this article which points out it was in his book.


"According to Scott Janish, author of The New IPA, “Oxygen needs to be converted to a radical activated form before it can react with other species in beer. This activation can be caused by trace metals in beer, like iron, copper, or manganese.” Scott added “Unmalted grains have more manganese than malted grains.”
 

wepeeler

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Flaked oats have higher manganese content which speeds the oxidation reactions. Maybe that's not the exact scientific method, but Mn definitely makes it worse. It is a big reason why many have switched to oat malt or GNO (basically oat crystal) as these have lower Mn content. I do think Flaked oats still have their place, but your observations are in line previously posted articles.

I swore Janish wrote about this, maybe it was in the book, I couldnt find it on his blog. Actually I just found this article which points out it was in his book.


"According to Scott Janish, author of The New IPA, “Oxygen needs to be converted to a radical activated form before it can react with other species in beer. This activation can be caused by trace metals in beer, like iron, copper, or manganese.” Scott added “Unmalted grains have more manganese than malted grains.”
I haven't used flaked oats in about 6 months, or 8 batches or so. I feel the end product is much better. I didn't switch specifically because of oxidation issues, as I've been lucky to not have experienced extreme oxidation, but I'm definitely aware of the literature regarding flaked adjuncts and oxidation and shelf life! Love Janish's book. Thanks man!
 

Jimmy_Hops

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Nobody's doing a mix of 2-row & Golden Promise for the base malt anymore?
I seem to remember that being popular a few years ago.
060F574E-35AA-4325-8D3A-CC7E1CD5C0C3.jpeg
9 lb (54.6%) - Viking 2-Row Xtra Pale Malt - Grain - 1.8 °L
4 lb (24.2%) - Simpsons Pale Ale Golden Promise - Grain - 2.4 °L
1 1b (6.1%) - Briess Carapils - Grain - 1.5 °L
1 Ib (6.1%) - Oats, Flaked - Grain - 2.5°L
8 oz (3%) - Thomas Fawcett Oats, Malted - Grain - 2 °L
8 oz (3%) - Wheat Flaked - Grain - 1°L
8 oz (3%) - Briess Wheat White Malt - Grain - 2.3 °L
This is my newest batch and it is great, still needs some carbonation but the aroma is flying out of the glass. And the color is beautiful (even without the flash on, just bad lighting in my basement). All that to say I used some Golden Promise in this recipe and it is working well.
 

Rob2010SS

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View attachment 763896
9 lb (54.6%) - Viking 2-Row Xtra Pale Malt - Grain - 1.8 °L
4 lb (24.2%) - Simpsons Pale Ale Golden Promise - Grain - 2.4 °L
1 1b (6.1%) - Briess Carapils - Grain - 1.5 °L
1 Ib (6.1%) - Oats, Flaked - Grain - 2.5°L
8 oz (3%) - Thomas Fawcett Oats, Malted - Grain - 2 °L
8 oz (3%) - Wheat Flaked - Grain - 1°L
8 oz (3%) - Briess Wheat White Malt - Grain - 2.3 °L
This is my newest batch and it is great, still needs some carbonation but the aroma is flying out of the glass. And the color is beautiful (even without the flash on, just bad lighting in my basement). All that to say I used some Golden Promise in this recipe and it is working well.
Can I ask what your SRM is at on that recipe? Beautiful beer my friend!
 

Adam Zerwick

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View attachment 763896
9 lb (54.6%) - Viking 2-Row Xtra Pale Malt - Grain - 1.8 °L
4 lb (24.2%) - Simpsons Pale Ale Golden Promise - Grain - 2.4 °L
1 1b (6.1%) - Briess Carapils - Grain - 1.5 °L
1 Ib (6.1%) - Oats, Flaked - Grain - 2.5°L
8 oz (3%) - Thomas Fawcett Oats, Malted - Grain - 2 °L
8 oz (3%) - Wheat Flaked - Grain - 1°L
8 oz (3%) - Briess Wheat White Malt - Grain - 2.3 °L
This is my newest batch and it is great, still needs some carbonation but the aroma is flying out of the glass. And the color is beautiful (even without the flash on, just bad lighting in my basement). All that to say I used some Golden Promise in this recipe and it is working well.

Looks very similar to the Verdant recipe for Even Sharks Need Water. When I tried this recipe out the color was spot on with what the OP was striving for. Brewfather had this at 3.9 SRM.
 

Jimmy_Hops

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Can I ask what your SRM is at on that recipe? Beautiful beer my friend!
It is based on the Verdant recipe and Brew Father says it’s 4.3 SRM. I used Mosaic, Sabro, and Galaxy in the dry hop incase you were wondering as I know different hops can add more “haze” than others.
 

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Do you remove your WP hops when transferring the wort to the fermenter? Or do you let the WP hops into the fermenter?

I guess I am supposed to remove them, but then WP hopping with loose pellets it is hard to separate them completely from the wort before the transfer.
 

nebulabrewing

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Do you remove your WP hops when transferring the wort to the fermenter? Or do you let the WP hops into the fermenter?

I guess I am supposed to remove them, but then WP hopping with loose pellets it is hard to separate them completely from the wort before the transfer.

I've brewed many hazy IPA's over the years, and I've done both. I've thrown everything in and transferred it all to the fv. I've bagged my hops and removed them once I've transferred to the fv. The results weren't different enough for me to notice, so I bag my WP to make cleaning easier.
 
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