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Noob Hops Grower Question

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SteveM

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As the saying goes, there are no stupid questions but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots! As a hops growing noob, I feel as though I have to ask this.

Why are these things called bines and every other climbing plant is a vine?

By the way, here is what I got from dictionary.com:

American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This bine
(bīn) Pronunciation Key
n. The flexible twining or climbing stem of certain plants, such as the hop, woodbine, or bindweed.


[Alteration of [FONT=arial,sans-serif]bind[/FONT], vine.]

(Download Now or Buy the Book) The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2006 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
WordNet - Cite This Source - Share This bine
nounEuropean twining plant whose flowers are used chiefly to flavor malt liquors; cultivated in America [syn: common hop]
WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.
 

GilaMinumBeer

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As "I" understand it has to do with the physical make up of the main trunk and how it attaches itself.

Vines, IIRC, typically have a sucker type stryucture that attaches to it's "host" support.

Bines, again IIRC, use tiny hair like spurs to hook onto the structure (which is why a textured support is necessary).

I could be waaaay of here.
 

cefmel

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Another thing too is that hops grow in a clockwise pattern looking down at them. This causes them to wrap around poles and other things that can support their weight.
 
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