No boil Brew in a Keg-20 min. brewday

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madscientist451

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I'm super busy in the summertime and have little time or energy for a full brewday, and sometimes turn to extract to get a fresh beer done.
So here comes Dr. Hans with a brew in a keg extract method: I guess you could call it BIAK.....
-Add DME to (sanitized) keg
-Add boiling water put lid on and shake
-Add hops, put lid on and shake again
-Add cold top up water
-Toss in yeast
-Add dry hops after a couple of days
-Serve out of the same keg (floating dip tube)
No boil extract brewing isn't anything new, extract doesn't need to be boiled, but I never thought of just using the keg for the whole process. I already ferment my IPA's in kegs with a shortened dip tube and then close transfer to the serving keg. I've never heard of the shake in a keg method, anyone tried anything like this?
Here's a link to the video:
 

pvtpublic

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I would suggest putting the hops in with the boil water, so that you can isomerize the the alpha acids. Boil it for 15 min so you can get around 15% utilization. I couldn't imagine getting very good isomerization with just adding hot water for 8 minutes. Other than that, I think this would work great, especially for an IPA. I would use aroma and flavor hops with as high AA% as possible to get the most out of it.
 
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I never thought of just using the keg for the whole process

I think this would work great, especially for an IPA.

Using a keg is the interesting (and apparently surprising [1]) idea. I don't have kegs so I don't think about using them in unusual ways.

I agree with @pvtpublic - this would appear to work well for hop forward styles.

The draw-backs appear to be 1) a lack of proven recipes and 2) may not 'model' well in brewing software.



Without reading a recipe and brew day notes, there's a bunch of uncertainly around hops (utilization, bitterness, IBUs, ...). At least one of the BBR hop sampler podcasts talked about lab measured IBUs. IIRC, the podcast also included a wort temperature range for the 20 minutes after the DME/hops were added. BBR also has a Nov 1 2018 podcast with a bunch of data. Anecdotal tasting reports suggest that one can get good results.



[1] Home brewing can a big bag of ingredients, a big bag of equipment, and a big bag of techniques. Or it can be levels, graduations, and 'never looking back'. I suspect that we'll continue to see more creative combinations for home brewing with the 'big bags of ...' model for home brewing.
 
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madscientist451

madscientist451

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Yeah, so I'm already thinking of taking a simple, quick method and making it more complicated.
As mentioned above, since the BIAK method uses boiled water, why not boil the hops?
So I've taken a recipe I found here:
And scaled it down to 2.5 3 gallons:
Steep 1/2 lb. C-40 and 1 oz chocolate malt for about 20 mins. in about 1.5 gallons of water.
Get it boiling, add 1/2 oz Amarillo+ 1/2 oz Centennial, 15 min boil
Add 1/2 oz. Amarillo and 1/2 oz Centennial to keg with 3 lbs. DME, dump in boiling water, shake and let sit about 10 mins
Add ice and chilled top up water, hopefully get temp down enough to toss in some yeast.
No dry hop.
I figure the whole thing should take less than an hour.
 

pvtpublic

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Steep 1/2 lb. C-40 and 1 oz chocolate malt for about 20 mins. in about 1.5 gallons of water.
Get it boiling, add 1/2 oz Amarillo+ 1/2 oz Centennial, 15 min boil
Add 1/2 oz. Amarillo and 1/2 oz Centennial to keg with 3 lbs. DME, dump in boiling water, shake and let sit about 10 mins
Add ice and chilled top up water, hopefully get temp down enough to toss in some yeast.
No dry hop.
I figure the whole thing should take less than an hour.
That's sounds pretty solid, it'll be balanced to the malty side. If I'm not a total moron with my calculations, that should put you somewhere around 1055 SG and about 19 IBU's, but with plenty of hop flavor. I doubt you'll get a Ninkasi with this method, but I'm definitely intrigued and would like to know about your results
 
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