Next steps from a modified JOAM?

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Smoothpop

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Hey all,
Complete novice brewer here, Ive recently bottled my first ever mead batch which is sort of based off JOAM, I made a large batch of 10L (2gallons) with 2700g (6lb) of mixed honey without the spices and a large handfull of smashed bleuberries in its place. For the yeast I used youngs all purpose brewing. I really like it and everyone ive given it to has loved it too though I would prefer it a little less sweet. The only real issue is its very high alcohol content. Im assuming its a result of using a brewing yeast rather than bread yeast but its unfortunately a bit too much for me. I have IBD and it tends to play up a lot when I have an apreciacble amount of high % drinks.

I was wondering if anyone can reccomend some beginner friendly recepes that dont require a lot of steps (im lazy) and have an explanation of why things are done the way they are so I can learn the why, not just the how, while not requiring much more than a brewing bucket and a few demijohns.

I realise I may be asking for the holy grail recepe but theres a lot of things im not fussed about. I dont mind if it takes a lot of time to brew as long as im not faffing around with it all the time and im not fussed about achieving the perfect taste or anything just something good enough.

Anyway thanks in advance for your replies.

best
Lewis

Edit: I suck at spelling!
 

Maylar

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If you're not willing to faff around a bit and get involved in your mead making, then you're pretty much limited to the JAOM protocol. There's nothing else I know of that's a set-and-forget mead. If you are willing to babysit your mead a bit, then check out the BOMM (Bray's One Month Mead) sticky at the top of this forum. Start at post # 17 where he corrected his original process.
 
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Smoothpop

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yea i didnt mean i just want to fire and forget its just that ive read a few recepes where you have to add the yeast gradually over a week with shaking inbetween and then rack every few weeks and add this that and the other on day x y and z which is a bit much for me. i dont mind putting in a bit of effort over the first few days and then generally keeping an eye on it i just dont want it to be and hour a day for a month.

ill check out BOMM and see if its what im after thanks.
 

Maylar

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You can make a generic mead without a lot of fuss, but the results can be unpredictable. 2.5 lbs. of honey and spring water to a gallon will give you an 11% mead. You do need nutrients, and generic wine nutrient at 1 tsp per gallon would work. Half of it at pitch and the other half after 2 days. Lalvin 71B or any wine yeast will work. The dangers are that if the temperature is too high you get fusel alcohols (rocket fuel) that take months to age out. Insufficient nutrients give you H2S - Hydrogen Sulfide - which stinks like rhino farts. But for a lazy man's mead, that's all you need.
 
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Smoothpop

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thankyou that seems like a fairly simple recepe. i may give it a try on the side though im going for a BOMM now
 

madscientist451

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I'm hardly ever home these days so I'm mostly a hands-off "lazy" mead maker.
Here are the main things I can tell you that have worked for me:
Don't heat the honey/water mixture above 100F.
If using wine yeast, use a whole pack per gallon of mead.
Use Go-Ferm when rehydrating the yeast and add Fermaid-O yeast nutrient after 24 hrs.
I use the TONSA 3.0 protocol to determine how much Go Ferm and Fermaid-O to use.
If you are making a low ABV mead, you can add all the yeast nutrient at one time, you don't need to stagger the nutrient additions.
I use carboys and swirl them around to rouse the yeast a few times a day when I'm home, but mostly its usually on its own and comes out fine.
 
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