New Stout Faucet, Old Kegerator System... Need Help!

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

mtcpilot

Active Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2011
Messages
28
Reaction score
1
Location
Denver
So here's my situation. Just got a brand new stout faucet for Christmas, but I'm not quite sure how to configure it with my current system. Space in the fridge is kind of a premium, so I'd rather not get a complete separate system if I can avoid it. I'd also rather not have to spend a ton more money right now, but if I'm going to end up with crappy pours, then it's worth spending the money. Here's the current setup and path of flow:

5 lb CO2 Tank>
Single Regulator>
4-Way Air Distributor>
2 Corny Kegs, 1 Commercial Keg, 1 valve unoccupied

Here's the options I've come up with so far:

1. Upgrade the Single Regulator to a Double Regulator, run everything on beer gas, but distribute one line from the regulator at high pressure (35 psi-ish) to the stout faucet, and the other regulator to the 4-way at normal serving pressure.

2. Keep the single regulator, run everything on beer gas, but install in-line regulators on each line.

3. 2 separate systems. 1 CO2, 1 Beer Gas.

One big lingering question I have is how does beer react when served on Beer Gas and NOT through a stout faucet or vice versa, how does beer react when served on CO2 THROUGH a stout faucet?

I love homebrewing, but I'm beginning to think buying a boat might have been cheaper!

Clark
 

zazbnf

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
660
Reaction score
101
One big lingering question I have is how does beer react when served on Beer Gas and NOT through a stout faucet or vice versa, how does beer react when served on CO2 THROUGH a stout faucet?

I love homebrewing, but I'm beginning to think buying a boat might have been cheaper!

Clark
If you run all on beer gas and you want to keep your current carbonation levels the same, you will need to increase the pressure on the non stout lines to compensate for the lower volume of co2 in the mix. Then you will need to increae the length of your non stout beer lines to increase resistance for the higher pressure.

*edit* The link below has calculators that would allow you to detaermine the new pressure you would need to maintain current level.

http://mcdantim.com/distributor-tools/calculators/
 

gnef

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2005
Messages
1,432
Reaction score
217
In my opinion, the best option is to have two completely separate systems, one for CO2, and the other for beergas.
 

Double_D

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Feb 17, 2011
Messages
1,958
Reaction score
215
Location
Las Vegas
I have Co2 going to the manifold. One line goes to two secondary regulators the other to the solo. On the solo I have the gas in side split with Co2 and beer gas. I did this so I can condition with Co2 then dispense with beer gas. There are valves on both of the gas lines that go to the solo regulator so I can switch back and forth or just use it as a regular tap by replacing the suit faucet. From there I ran the gas lines through the wall of the fridge through the vent in the freezer into the main compartment. I ran a liquid line through the freezer once and I froze solid.
 
Top