New rhizomes

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JMan551

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Last year I was given a couple of rhizomes from a Willamette crown (from what I was told, it was a 150 year old crown from a hop farm in OR...brought to WA about a generation ago) and they did extremely well. I wanted to expand my library of hop variety so I recently ordered a Cascade, Mt. Hood, Nugget, and Northern Brew. They showed up today and I received two rhizomes per bag (8 total rhizomes).

My Willamette's grew just fine on their own (planted each piece separately), is the intent to plant both pieces together? Did I get a double order on accident?

I have no idea where i'm going to put all of these plants. I had already decided to buy some barrel planters to plant my new ones in, because sunny garden space is at a minimum (my Willamette's have about all the space there is in the back). Any ideas on how I can get these all planted without spending hundreds on large planter boxes? I might be able to put some on the side of the house, but do deer eat hop?

Sorry for the mostly unorganized post, it's been quite the day. :mug:

JER
 

sickbrew

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I've always planted two together to ensure that at least one of the rhizomes is robust and healthy.

As to where to plant them you'll have to be creative and make the most of your situation. I'd first look for natural spots on your property with good light where there is an existing structure for the bines to grow up. I have some growing along a chain link fence, which takes some training and others growing up structures I've made for them. If you need to build something do a trellis search and review the images.

I'm sure that deer will love them, especially when the bines are young and tender. That will be quite challenging if your property isn't fenced.

Good luck.
 
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JMan551

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Thanks. My back yard is fenced, and I have never seen any deer back there (or signs of them). I know that they do come around because the neighbor has some evergreen/christmas type tree that lines their front lawn and it's nibbled on up to about 6ft.

I still have a month or so before my planting window is gone, I'll have to sketch up some ideas. I have a couple of ideas already, could work out awesome...or terrible. We'll see.

Thank you for the advice
JER

:cheers: from WA
 

ThreeDogsNE

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FYI, that crown might be 150 years old, or it might be another more historical variety. The Willamette variety dates to 1967. See this link: http://thehennings.com/beer/hops.html#21041

It looks like Hallertauer, Gloldings, or Fuggles might be that old, or maybe some more historical varieties like Promise or Cluster. Others may better ideas on hops of that vintage.
 
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JMan551

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Hmm...I never even thought about that! I was told that the plant that my cuttings came from was cut from one of the original plants (a Willamette) from a hop farm in OR (I believe his Great or Great Great Grandma). Considering Willamette was from about 1967, my plant must be a different variety...or my buddy is full of it and made up a cool story for me. Did they even hop farm down in OR 150 years ago? I know my great grandparents used to go work hop fields in Yakima area, so it is possible...

Thank you for pointing that out, I may try and find a way to get these identified (cause i'm no good with plant stuff)!

JER
 

ThreeDogsNE

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I don't know too much about hop farming in the 1860s to begin with, much less in Oregon. This site may have some people who could help.

http://www.americanhopmuseum.org/history.htm

There are several threads here about identifying hops. Once they have grown a bit the cones and leaves may allow comparison to answer the question. I'm wating to do just that for a couple of my plants. Mine were in 5 gallon buckets initially, and the marker on the outside of the buckets didn't last long enough. I still knew what was where--but then someone else moved the buckets. I have a couple of question marks on my hops plant map now.
 
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