New Product Announcement From SPIKE!

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
For those of you who have been a part of the Spike community for awhile, you know that innovation, quality and sexy looking stainless have always been a top priority for us.

Which is why we're excited to tell you about 5 new products launching this year! The first of which, the Spike All-In-One PRV is coming spring 2022!

For a while now, we've seen some sketchy DIY set ups for pressure fermenting, spunding, etc. We listened to the market and created a pretty unique piece of equipment that puts your safety first without compromising on features or functionality. And when you're dealing with pressure, is pretty damn important.

Click the image below (or link) and enter your email on the right to keep up to date on all the product specifics, launch details, and some super fun stuff! We'll keep this thread up to date with product details, explainer videos, etc as they become available.

3B_PRV-Launch-Graphics_2500x2500_SE.jpg
2/8/22

Unless you've been living under a rock, you know that Spike is coming out with a new All-In-One PRV. But what causes pressure and how does a PRV work? There are some things you need to think about when it comes to how pressure can build inside your vessel during fermentation.

So here's a science lesson:

When yeast is pitched into the conical, it eats the sugar extracted from the grain and produces alcohol and carbon dioxide (CO2) gas.

That CO2 produced by the yeast MUST be handled carefully, otherwise the vessel can become over pressurized which will make it very unsafe! This is why a large-port robust PRV (pressure release valve) is so important. A PRV is designed to automatically vent CO2 gas from inside your fermenter at a set pressure. Since our fermenters are designed for 15psi that's what our new All-In-One PRV is designed to release at.

Basically, we don't want your vessel to turn into a bomb.

If you swipe to the last image, you'll see that when the pressure is building and still below the limit of the PRV, it remains sealed and allows that pressure to stay in the tank—such as for spunding or pressure fermenting.

When the pressure reaches 15psi (or a lower pressure as this PRV is adjustable), the seal and spring lifts up to allow it to escape or "bubble out." This is the same type of phenomenon that you see when a blow-off tube is in a bucket of starsan, or in an airlock device.

That's it! Thanks for attending our TED talk!

Pressure.jpg

2/23/22

The new All-In-One is fully adjustable from 0-15psi. Simply twist the top adjustment knob to increase or decrease the pressure inside your fermenter. This allows for use with everything from pressure fermenting to spunding to carbonating to pressure transfers to kegs!

PRV.PNG
3/3/22

Welcome to our Pressure Fail Series. Where we chat about common myths, misconceptions and #fail's of the existing PRV's on the market.

Let's begin with what's commonly known as the Bowtie 'spunding valve'.

This design was originally intended for use in kegs, but we see users move them to the top of their conicals for pressure fermentation and spunding all the time!
🤦🏻
The tiny outlet can easily clog during a vigorous fermentation which can create a super dangerous situation. A LARGE outlet port was the first design consideration we focused on; safety first, beer second. With the new Spike All-In-One PRV, we use a full 1.5" TC port design which will not get clogged with krausen, hops, etc!

1_1_022022_PRV-Pressure-Fail-Graphic-Series_SE.jpg
2_3_022022_PRV-Pressure-Fail-Graphic-Series_SE.jpg
 
Last edited:

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
Looks similar to the spunding valve from SS BrewTech... Is the part where you can dial in the pressure level graduated? If not, it should be. That way we can set it to at least the general pressure level we want before fermentation starts and not have to worry about catching it as it gets to (or starts to go over) that level. I have three of the those spunding valves (graduated version) now. Two in use, one in reserve for the next conical I get (would be the third one here).
 

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
2,135
Reaction score
1,936
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
Looks similar to the spunding valve from SS BrewTech... Is the part where you can dial in the pressure level graduated? If not, it should be. That way we can set it to at least the general pressure level we want before fermentation starts and not have to worry about catching it as it gets to (or starts to go over) that level. I have three of the those spunding valves (graduated version) now. Two in use, one in reserve for the next conical I get (would be the third one here).
It looks like the best parts of the SS BrewTech spunding cup and the Spike manifold. I have both. Looks like somebody left the two items too close together on the drying rack and they produced an offspring. Neat, cool piece of gear. I want several.
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
The bastard love child of the two... 🤪

I just hope the Spike version does have graduated marks on the pressure adjustment item (like the SS BrewTech ones I have do). That would make it a slam dunk for me. Granted, I'm only using two of the three 1-1/2" TC ports on the conical lids (I don't use the blowoff fitting) which means I can use the O2 free hop dropper whenever needed (without moving anything else). Of course, I'd then need to figure out what to do with the three SS BrewTech spunding valves I have now.
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
Looks similar to the spunding valve from SS BrewTech... Is the part where you can dial in the pressure level graduated? If not, it should be. That way we can set it to at least the general pressure level we want before fermentation starts and not have to worry about catching it as it gets to (or starts to go over) that level. I have three of the those spunding valves (graduated version) now. Two in use, one in reserve for the next conical I get (would be the third one here).

It does not as it has the pressure gauge. We understand what you're saying about 'set and forget' however we've found the graduated marks to be highly inaccurate.
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
It does not as it has the pressure gauge. We understand what you're saying about 'set and forget' however we've found the graduated marks to be highly inaccurate.
The SS BrewTech item isn't highly accurate. It's graduated in bar levels, so it has that going for it. :rolleyes: It would be helpful to know that you're at about 5psi as opposed to 8psi or 2psi. Or knowing I'm at my fermenting setting as opposed to carbonation setting. Fine tuning it (for fermenting at least) once things are going full bore. Since the thing has a gauge that exceeds the rating of your conicals, having SOME kind of marks in place should be there. Minute of barn is better than minute of planet after all.
 

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
2,135
Reaction score
1,936
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
The bastard love child of the two... 🤪

I just hope the Spike version does have graduated marks on the pressure adjustment item (like the SS BrewTech ones I have do). That would make it a slam dunk for me. Granted, I'm only using two of the three 1-1/2" TC ports on the conical lids (I don't use the blowoff fitting) which means I can use the O2 free hop dropper whenever needed (without moving anything else). Of course, I'd then need to figure out what to do with the three SS BrewTech spunding valves I have now.
Don't temp me, I might make you an offer! Actually, the one I use is the unmarked cheap one. It seemed like a pain at first, but I've adapted. I know about how many turns it takes from being fully closed to approximating a 15 psi release pressure where the tiny stream of bubbles begins. The bad part is when I neglect to set it before fermentation starts and pressure builds. No matter how slowly I try to release it, I always seem to get a rapid release when the valve finally opens, followed by a shower of StarSan blow-by. It's easy enough to fine tune once it finally comes unseated, but the best way to set it is to let 1~2 psi build and then adjust incrementally to higher pressure after the spund initially releases.
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
Don't temp me, I might make you an offer! Actually, the one I use is the unmarked cheap one. It seemed like a pain at first, but I've adapted. I know about how many turns it takes from being fully closed to approximating a 15 psi release pressure where the tiny stream of bubbles begins. The bad part is when I neglect to set it before fermentation starts and pressure builds. No matter how slowly I try to release it, I always seem to get a rapid release when the valve finally opens, followed by a shower of StarSan blow-by. It's easy enough to fine tune once it finally comes unseated, but the best way to set it is to let 1~2 psi build and then adjust incrementally to higher pressure after the spund initially releases.
I'd be inclined to make marks on the fixed part so that I would know when I'm at the setting I want. Or at least close enough to fine tune it if needed (later). IMO/IME, having NO marks is not optimal. I know people bought the unmarked (cheaper) version, but I got the graduated version since I'd at least have SOME idea of what the release level would be.
 

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
2,135
Reaction score
1,936
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
I'd be inclined to make marks on the fixed part so that I would know when I'm at the setting I want. Or at least close enough to fine tune it if needed (later). IMO/IME, having NO marks is not optimal. I know people bought the unmarked (cheaper) version, but I got the graduated version since I'd at least have SOME idea of what the release level would be.
Yeah, I should have said "less expensive" SS BrewTech version as opposed to "cheap", since even the ungraduated one isn't cheap. I once made a mark with an ink pen on the plunger, but of course it didn't last any longer than the first cleaning.
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
That's why I ALWAYS check for an operable PRV somewhere on the 'pressurized' side before capping. ALWAYS.
I have the PRV in the [Spike] gas manifold fitted to the conicals every time they're used (I leave them connected). Still, NOT having a way to set the spunding side is suboptimal. But, knowing that I'm at 5psi for ferment (or at least within 1psi of that) is far better than guestimating and being at 10psi and not knowing it until you check later.

I crank down on the spunding setting when it's time to carbonate the beer. I don't remove it for that function. Since I'm chilling the beer down to carbonate, I typically keep the 'into conical' PSI levels to not more than 12-13psi. I use the manifold to confirm that at the start and then maybe once a day until I shutoff the gas going in (a few days later).

IMO, if they want to have the lower cost version without graduations, and have a slightly more expensive version WITH graduations, I'd get the one with. With the setup I have, I don't have a real NEED to get this one. Especially since I don't need to free up another port for any batches. As I mentioned, using the manifold on one, and the SSBT spunding valve on another leaves one available for dry hopping (for my pale ales) or adding oak to recipes calling for that. I've not used the included blowoff fitting a single time since I started using the conical fermenters. Doubt I ever will.
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
Yeah, I should have said "less expensive" SS BrewTech version as opposed to "cheap", since even the ungraduated one isn't cheap. I once made a mark with an ink pen on the plunger, but of course it didn't last any longer than the first cleaning.
Get a carbide scribe tool to mark it. Use the piece that spins free in the unit as a guide.
Like one of these:

I'd probably use one of mine to make marks on the Spike item, IF I end up getting one.
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
The SS BrewTech item isn't highly accurate. It's graduated in bar levels, so it has that going for it. :rolleyes: It would be helpful to know that you're at about 5psi as opposed to 8psi or 2psi. Or knowing I'm at my fermenting setting as opposed to carbonation setting. Fine tuning it (for fermenting at least) once things are going full bore. Since the thing has a gauge that exceeds the rating of your conicals, having SOME kind of marks in place should be there. Minute of barn is better than minute of planet after all.

The Ali-In-One maxes out at 15psi so although the gauge goes higher the PRV can not.
 

natmartin

Active Member
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
40
Reaction score
23
Location
Alameda, CA
@SpikeBrewing My understanding of your previous guidance said that to safely pressure ferment, you needed two methods of pressure relief: a spunding valve to set the desired pressure, and a fixed PRV in case the spunding valve fails.

Does this product actually have both releases built-in? Or is it a single pressure relief that's adjustable?
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
@SpikeBrewing My understanding of your previous guidance said that to safely pressure ferment, you needed two methods of pressure relief: a spunding valve to set the desired pressure, and a fixed PRV in case the spunding valve fails.

Does this product actually have both releases built-in? Or is it a single pressure relief that's adjustable?

You need a PRV that is a full port design so it can't get clogged. Our gas manifold bundle and other smaller "spunding valves" only have a 1/4" opening or smaller which can easily get clogged. This was specially designed to be able to handle everything safely.
 

Ridenour64

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2012
Messages
570
Reaction score
209
A fermenter with a tri clamp lid would be great, please!
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
Unless you've been living under a rock, you know that Spike is coming out with a new All-In-One PRV. But what causes pressure and how does a PRV work? There are some things you need to think about when it comes to how pressure can build inside your vessel during fermentation.

So here's a science lesson:

When yeast is pitched into the conical, it eats the sugar extracted from the grain and produces alcohol and carbon dioxide (CO2) gas.

That CO2 produced by the yeast MUST be handled carefully, otherwise the vessel can become over pressurized which will make it very unsafe! This is why a large-port robust PRV (pressure release valve) is so important. A PRV is designed to automatically vent CO2 gas from inside your fermenter at a set pressure. Since our fermenters are designed for 15psi that's what our new All-In-One PRV is designed to release at.

Basically, we don't want your vessel to turn into a bomb.

If you swipe to the last image, you'll see that when the pressure is building and still below the limit of the PRV, it remains sealed and allows that pressure to stay in the tank—such as for spunding or pressure fermenting.

When the pressure reaches 15psi (or a lower pressure as this PRV is adjustable), the seal and spring lifts up to allow it to escape or "bubble out." This is the same type of phenomenon that you see when a blow-off tube is in a bucket of starsan, or in an airlock device.

That's it! Thanks for attending our TED talk!

Pressure.jpg

 
Last edited:

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
Is the thing not adjustable to set the pressure level you want to maintain in the fermenter? Say I wanted to keep 5psi inside the conical. Can this be set to keep that level or will it only release at 15psi?
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
I still think having NO marks on the thing for the pressure level it's at (even if it's a rough marking) is a bad idea. Especially since you CAN get ones that do offer that aspect that are easy to find. I have three of them currently (only two conicals at this time, so ready for #3).

I can't be the only person who would take advantage of that feature.

I'm also fermenting at 5psi (+/- 1psi).
 

Gus_13

Cul de Sac Brewer
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Messages
432
Reaction score
242
Location
Brandon, MS
I still think having NO marks on the thing for the pressure level it's at (even if it's a rough marking) is a bad idea. Especially since you CAN get ones that do offer that aspect that are easy to find. I have three of them currently (only two conicals at this time, so ready for #3).

I can't be the only person who would take advantage of that feature.

I'm also fermenting at 5psi (+/- 1psi).

Aren't the ones with markings pretty unreliable? This has a gauge built right in to tell where it is. I would think a gauge like that would be more accurate and easier to read than tick marks on something that is screwed in and out. I thought it was a great idea to do it this way.
 

Nate R

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
1,568
Reaction score
967
Location
Sacramento
Aren't the ones with markings pretty unreliable? This has a gauge built right in to tell where it is. I would think a gauge like that would be more accurate and easier to read than tick marks on something that is screwed in and out. I thought it was a great idea to do it this way.
It's like Calahan Auto Parts. There's no guarentee on the box!
 

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
2,135
Reaction score
1,936
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
Aren't the ones with markings pretty unreliable? This has a gauge built right in to tell where it is. I would think a gauge like that would be more accurate and easier to read than tick marks on something that is screwed in and out. I thought it was a great idea to do it this way.
Probably not as exacting as you'd think. The pressure in an active fermenting vessel is dynamic but the release point at which the spunding valve is set to maintain isn't necessarily the static pressure at which it starts releasing. Local barometric pressure may also affect the pressure of initial release as well as sustained open pressure, as can temperature variations. There's always a +/- factor involved. These spunding valves give approximations but they aren't precision measuring devices. Fortunately for our purposes they are close enough. In my experience there is always some fine tuning involved after flow starts at release pressure and a stable discharge rate and constant desired pressure is established.

When I bought my spunding cup from SS BrewTech I wanted the more expensive graduated one, but opted for the less expensive ungraduated one. After using it for a couple of years I think it was the right choice. I know how many ¼ turns it takes from fully closed to approximately ~1 atm/15 psig. Once fermentation generates enough pressure to begin releasing (either high or low) I simply fine tune the plunger based on the stream of bubbles in the cup. If pressure, as read on the tank pressure gauge, drops I tighten the gap. If bubbles slow and pressure increases, I increase the gap, just as I would if the plunger had graduated markings. All they really give you is a starting point. In no way will they ever give you an accurate preset pressure. It usually takes time and 2-3 adjustments to get it set accurately.

The advantage of the new Spike combo spund/w pressure gauge and PRV is that you only tie up one TC port to get three separate devices, just like the Spike manifold that has Gas In, PRV, and tank pressure gauges mounted into one TC fitting. Really neat devices, and great for us home brewers who use pressurized systems.
 

Gus_13

Cul de Sac Brewer
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Messages
432
Reaction score
242
Location
Brandon, MS
Probably not as exacting as you'd think. The pressure in an active fermenting vessel is dynamic but the release point at which the spunding valve is set to maintain isn't necessarily the static pressure at which it starts releasing. Local barometric pressure may also affect the pressure of initial release as well as sustained open pressure, as can temperature variations. There's always a +/- factor involved. These spunding valves give approximations but they aren't precision measuring devices. Fortunately for our purposes they are close enough. In my experience there is always some fine tuning involved after flow starts at release pressure and a stable discharge rate and constant desired pressure is established.

When I bought my spunding cup from SS BrewTech I wanted the more expensive graduated one, but opted for the less expensive ungraduated one. After using it for a couple of years I think it was the right choice. I know how many ¼ turns it takes from fully closed to approximately ~1 atm/15 psig. Once fermentation generates enough pressure to begin releasing (either high or low) I simply fine tune the plunger based on the stream of bubbles in the cup. If pressure, as read on the tank pressure gauge, drops I tighten the gap. If bubbles slow and pressure increases, I increase the gap, just as I would if the plunger had graduated markings. All they really give you is a starting point. In no way will they ever give you an accurate preset pressure. It usually takes time and 2-3 adjustments to get it set accurately.

The advantage of the new Spike combo spund/w pressure gauge and PRV is that you only tie up one TC port to get three separate devices, just like the Spike manifold that has Gas In, PRV, and tank pressure gauges mounted into one TC fitting. Really neat devices, and great for us home brewers who use pressurized systems.

Right, that's what I'm saying though (in shorter words and not as detailed as you). The gauge get's you a starting point where as the fixed graduations on the knob will not always be accurate. This you'll have the ability to adjust but also have the gauge there to have a base starting point. I think my point is in agreement with your post, at least that's what I am thinking. I'm in preference of the gauge and not graduations on the valve plus the added benefit of only needing one port for it. I'll have a valve on my blow off and just close it when my lagers are close to spund them under my desired pressure. That's the idea in my head anyway.
 

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
2,135
Reaction score
1,936
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
Right, that's what I'm saying though (in shorter words and not as detailed as you). The gauge get's you a starting point where as the fixed graduations on the knob will not always be accurate. This you'll have the ability to adjust but also have the gauge there to have a base starting point. I think my point is in agreement with your post, at least that's what I am thinking. I'm in preference of the gauge and not graduations on the valve plus the added benefit of only needing one port for it. I'll have a valve on my blow off and just close it when my lagers are close to spund them under my desired pressure. That's the idea in my head anyway.
Same here. The pressure gauge on my unitank is right next to the spunding valve cup, so fine adjustments are simple to see. I've had few times while adjusting the valve that the pressure initially rises above where I want >15 psig, so I'll slowly start turning the plunger to a lower tension on the spring. And I do mean slowly. Even though spring tension is being lowered the valve often doesn't open. Until it DOES! That's usually accompanied by a rapid discharge of pressure and a spray of Star San over about a 5' radius.

The last few brew sessions I purposely set the spring tension way low at the start (higher up the threaded plunger) so that the spund would release at a much lower pressure, and a less vigorous eruption when it did. That actually worked much better. Ten or 12 hours after pitching yeast, enough pressure builds up to 2~3 psi to unseat the valve and start letting gas escape. I can open the valve to maintain 0.5~1.0 psig differential until I'm ready to spund to 15 psi for carbonation, or just open the shut-off valve to the blow-off and let it vent until I'm ready to spund. That way I avoid the Star San shower.
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
The new All-In-One is fully adjustable from 0-15psi. Simply twist the top adjustment knob to increase or decrease the pressure inside your fermenter. This allows for use with everything from pressure fermenting to spunding to carbonating to pressure transfers to kegs!

PRV.PNG
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
13,755
Reaction score
1,885
Location
Living free in the 603
Aren't the ones with markings pretty unreliable? This has a gauge built right in to tell where it is. I would think a gauge like that would be more accurate and easier to read than tick marks on something that is screwed in and out. I thought it was a great idea to do it this way.
The markings at least get you into the range. No markings means you have no fracking idea where it's set to. When I carbonate, I set it to 1bar (just under 15psi) to keep it from venting what I'm infusing.

I'm holding to no marks is being short sighted. They could simply have it on the screw that moves to change the pressure release aspect. I'm not looking for high accuracy 1psi increments. 2-4 psi increments would be fine. Hell, in a pinch, 5psi would be 'OK' (but not optimal). At least give us SOME IDEA of where the setting is. Last thing I want is to start a batch, THINK I have it set where I want it, only to find out (in another day or two) that the pressure inside is either way higher than I wanted, or way lower than I wanted.
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
The markings at least get you into the range. No markings means you have no fracking idea where it's set to. When I carbonate, I set it to 1bar (just under 15psi) to keep it from venting what I'm infusing.

I'm holding to no marks is being short sighted. They could simply have it on the screw that moves to change the pressure release aspect. I'm not looking for high accuracy 1psi increments. 2-4 psi increments would be fine. Hell, in a pinch, 5psi would be 'OK' (but not optimal). At least give us SOME IDEA of where the setting is. Last thing I want is to start a batch, THINK I have it set where I want it, only to find out (in another day or two) that the pressure inside is either way higher than I wanted, or way lower than I wanted.

Thanks for the feedback!
 

Tom R

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
594
Reaction score
718
Location
S. Puget Sound
The markings at least get you into the range. No markings means you have no fracking idea where it's set to. When I carbonate, I set it to 1bar (just under 15psi) to keep it from venting what I'm infusing.

I'm holding to no marks is being short sighted. They could simply have it on the screw that moves to change the pressure release aspect. I'm not looking for high accuracy 1psi increments. 2-4 psi increments would be fine. Hell, in a pinch, 5psi would be 'OK' (but not optimal). At least give us SOME IDEA of where the setting is. Last thing I want is to start a batch, THINK I have it set where I want it, only to find out (in another day or two) that the pressure inside is either way higher than I wanted, or way lower than I wanted.
It's kind of a pain, but you could pre-set it to exactly the pressure you want by clamping a TC gas post to it, then pressurizing with CO2 while you adjust the release pressure. That's how I set my blow-tie PRV.
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
Welcome to our Pressure Fail Series. Where we chat about common myths, misconceptions and #fail's of the existing PRV's on the market.

Let's begin with what's commonly known as the Bowtie 'spunding valve'.

This design was originally intended for use in kegs, but we see users move them to the top of their conicals for pressure fermentation and spunding all the time!
🤦🏻
The tiny outlet can easily clog during a vigorous fermentation which can create a super dangerous situation. A LARGE outlet port was the first design consideration we focused on; safety first, beer second. With the new Spike All-In-One PRV, we use a full 1.5" TC port design which will not get clogged with krausen, hops, etc!

1_1_022022_PRV-Pressure-Fail-Graphic-Series_SE.jpg
2_3_022022_PRV-Pressure-Fail-Graphic-Series_SE.jpg
 

matt_m

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 6, 2017
Messages
1,282
Reaction score
600
It's kind of a pain, but you could pre-set it to exactly the pressure you want by clamping a TC gas post to it, then pressurizing with CO2 while you adjust the release pressure. That's how I set my blow-tie PRV.

With my existing spunding valve of similar design, I pressurize my conical to 5PSI per the gauge on the Spike gas manifold and slowly open the spunding valve until it starts bubbling. I expect to do the same when I order these. Looking forward to these because it will significantly reduce the number of components I need to clean having a separate gas manifold plus the parts needed to tie in the spunding valve without having to swap parts around.
 
OP
OP
SpikeBrewing
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
521
Location
Milwaukee
Pressure Fail #2

This design is also popular, but still has a very small outlet that can get clogged. Krausen or hops can get up into the outlet and clog or ‘glue’ the relief valve seal closed. A smaller outlet port means less surface area which creates less force pushing up on it. A full port design like the Spike All-In-One PRV has 7 times more surface area than this product and thus 7x the force on the plunger to prevent it from sticking closed.

Again, the goal is not to discourage people from purchasing other company’s products. The goal is to educate all brewers on what is a safe setup and what is not. We’ve seen so many unsafe pressure setups lately and we can speak for all manufacturers that the last thing anyone wants to see is someone get hurt! Safety first, beer second!

1_2_022022_PRV-Pressure-Fail-Graphic-Series_SE.jpg
2_1_022022_PRV-Pressure-Fail-Graphic-Series_SE.jpg
 

Yesfan

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Messages
2,318
Reaction score
573
Location
Cleveland
The markings at least get you into the range. No markings means you have no fracking idea where it's set to. When I carbonate, I set it to 1bar (just under 15psi) to keep it from venting what I'm infusing.

I'm holding to no marks is being short sighted. They could simply have it on the screw that moves to change the pressure release aspect. I'm not looking for high accuracy 1psi increments. 2-4 psi increments would be fine. Hell, in a pinch, 5psi would be 'OK' (but not optimal). At least give us SOME IDEA of where the setting is. Last thing I want is to start a batch, THINK I have it set where I want it, only to find out (in another day or two) that the pressure inside is either way higher than I wanted, or way lower than I wanted.

It's kind of a pain, but you could pre-set it to exactly the pressure you want by clamping a TC gas post to it, then pressurizing with CO2 while you adjust the release pressure. That's how I set my blow-tie PRV.


What's the gas post on the valve for? I thought this was how you set the adjustable prv.......or is it like the Spike manifold that just lets you pressurize the whole fermenter? I've not used these types of spunding valves, much less done a lot of pressure fermentations, so I'm just spitballing here.

Good idea from Tom R. Another one is take the butterfly valve (if you don't have an extra valve) from your fermenter and put it between the fermenter's port and adjustable prv valve. Use the butterfly valve to close off the prv from the fermenter to set your pressure. My guess with the butterfly closed, you can then adjust the prv to the desired pressure since gas can't escape into the fermenter. Then exhaust the gas between the butterfly and prv and put the butterfly valve back where it goes.
 
Last edited:
Top