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New hop varieties

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nagmay

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We may be entering a new renaissance when it comes to hop varieties!

As many of you know, I have my own experimental breeding program going on - but, I'm also always interested to learn about any new hops entering the market. So, I thought I'd start up a thread to document new one as they become available.
 
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nagmay

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To start things off, Great Lakes Hops just released 10 new varieties in their "Heritage collection". At the moment it looks like they are available to everyone for preorder:


GLH Arcadian
  • Light Floral and Orange/Tangerine
  • Alpha: 9.8%
  • Beta: 7.5%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 6lbs 9.8oz (wet weight)

GLH Walhalla™
  • Light Citrus w/ hint of garlic (very faint) some grassy/herbal too.
  • Alpha: 5.97 - 10%
  • Beta: 3.75 - 6%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 9lbs 4.8oz (wet weight)

GLH Prussian™
  • Lemony citrus w/ piney notes
  • Alpha: 4.29%
  • Beta: 2.73%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 3lbs 9.4oz (wet weight)

GLH Petoskey™
  • Unique floral, pungent, pineapple
  • Alpha: 12.11%
  • Beta: 6.16%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 6lbs 9.1oz (wet weight)

GLH Hartwick™
  • Piney, overripe pineapple - Distinctly different aroma profile from others in collection
  • Alpha: 12.28%
  • Beta: 5.77%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 12lbs 11.3oz (wet weight)

GLH Saugatuck™
  • Fragrant, hard to pin down but pleasant and interesting.
  • Alpha: 5.39%
  • Beta: 3.27%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 12lbs 13.1oz (wet weight)

GLH Old Mission™
  • Citrus, light pine, tea spice, herbal, pepper, tartness.
  • Alpha: 4.33%
  • Beta: 3.70%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 14lbs 11.9oz (wet weight)
GLH Shaddock™
  • Interesting lime/grapefruit, bright, - low onion/garlic.
  • Alpha: 4.96%
  • Beta: 3.59%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 7lbs 13.4oz (wet weight)

GLH Diamond Springs™
  • Citrusy/bright, lemon, mint, interesting aroma
  • Alpha: 4.83%
  • Beta: 3.18%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 12lbs 9.8oz (wet weight)

GLH Lawton™
  • Pungent, woody & earthy – not citrusy – totally dank.
  • Alpha: 3.5 -4.0% from uncultivated specimen
  • Beta: 3.0-3.2
  • Yield: high – based on cone size and set on specimen plant
 
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nagmay

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They have also released some "Select" varieties. Looks like you'll need to be a commercial farmer, GLH associate member, and obtain a license from GHL to grow these...

Paradigm™
  • Herbal, Stone fruit, Tropical, Spice, Melon, Candy, Bright
  • Alpha Acids: 8 - 10.2%
  • Beta Acids: 3.9 - 4.6%
  • 5lbs 12oz Wet Weight

Gemini™
  • Honey Dew, Strawberry, Eucalyptus, Rosemary, Fruit Cocktail
  • Alpha Acids: 6-8%
  • Beta Acids: 3-4%
  • 5lbs 12oz Wet Weight

Emerald Spire™
  • Peach, Juicy Fruit, White Grape, Watermelon, Skunk, Bubble Gum, Melon Rind
  • Alpha Acids: 7%
  • Beta Acids: 3.5%
  • 2lbs 11oz Wet Weight

Bergamot™
  • Mango, Orange, Dank, Cherry, Zest, Lemongrass, Lime Aid, Juniper, Orange Juice
  • Alpha Acids: 8 - 9%
  • Beta Acids: 7.5 - 8%
  • 1lbs Wet Weight
 

marc_

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USDA has released a few cultivars to commercial growers... Most of them are reportedly high yielders and fairly disease resistant.

NortheastPlants (dotca) has write ups on the cultivars.

At this point, there's only one named variety - Triumph
 

friarsmith

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Thanks for the heads-up. I'm always on the lookout for new noble-ish varieties that produce well. My Columbia, Cluster, Vanguard, Mt Hood and Sorachi Ace do a pretty respectable job. I wish I liked Sterling, but it doesn't measure up to store bought Saaz IMO. My Santiam (US Tett) grew well (and was good in brews) until my neighbor sprayed glyphosate on the other side of our fenceline :< It died within 5 days... (sigh)
 
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Northern_Brewer

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Most of the new British ones are being released through Farams, this page gives a bit of an update with profiles :
https://www.charlesfaram.co.uk/hop-development/

Archer and Minstrel, both hedgerow varieties and both with a classic, traditional aroma with a slight twist due to their hedgerow parent. These are proving popular with growers and brewers alike but are not quite getting as much “airtime” due to their traditional flavours. They are expected to have a big future in craft markets worldwide who are looking for more of the traditional flavours as beer styles develop away from the high hits of the West Coast IPA style hops....

Jester and Olicana, strong plants with “new world” aroma, excellent disease resistance and good yield...

We then developed Godiva which was released in 2017, and are now close to the end of development of Harlequin and Mystic.
Jester has taken off pretty well, it's almost mainstream these days. You'll occasionally see Olicana, but Archer and Minstrel are almost invisible. I've had a Godiva beer at the GBBF but towards the end of the day, I've seen one or two breweries announcing Harlequin and Mystic beers but never seen one on the bar.

They are also marketing the Instone hop from Instone Court, which is probably a Fuggle seedling.

Wye Hops have also been rummaging through their archives to reassess varieties like Ernest that was previously dismissed for tasting "too American".
 

NitrogenWidget

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I'm planning on 2 each of Arcadian and hartwick this spring.
then hoping they make nice beers for the following summer.
 

Wesmando

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I have noticed several of those old world/heirloom varieties GLH offered are not listed on their onliner catalog this year. I may have over looked them, but i didnt see them. I am also wandering about the copyrighted and trade marked plants for commercial production. Why grow a plant that yields $8-10/lb if you can grow close to the same yield and sell it for $28-45/lb. The question is, how do you obtain these plants, and will it cost me my first born.
 

NitrogenWidget

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I just looked and the heritage collection hops are available to purchase as plants. It’s not in the standard store.

My question is, I’m in the NE. I can’t put plants in the ground until end of April or early May.

But I don’t want to have them sell out on me. Can I store them in the fridge or plant them in pots to keep in the house and transplant in a few months?

I know rhizomes will be happy in the fridge for months. But I don’t know what to do with crowns.
 

Sylvain

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you can also place them in pot while waiting, no problem

"tu peux également les placer en pot en attendant, pas de problème"
 

NitrogenWidget

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you can also place them in pot while waiting, no problem

"tu peux également les placer en pot en attendant, pas de problème"
Really?
OK. Where do I put the pot?
Basement where it's cold and dark or keep them where the sun is?
 

Sylvain

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Chez vous l'hiver est fini?
Si oui, vous pouvez les garder dehors si il ne gèle plus
 
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Apimyces

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I'd say cold and dark until they start growing, which they likely will if kept for a long time, at which point you may as well put them out into the sun as much as possible because they'll be draining their reserves by then for that new growth.
 

Sylvain

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Everything also depends on the winter. At me spring is already settled, so everything is out.
"Tout dépend de l'hiver?
Chez moi le printemps est déjà installé, donc tout est dehors."
 

NitrogenWidget

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I ordered today from Great Lakes hops and they won't ship until at least april 1st so I should be ok.
 

Bender_Braus_Brewing

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To start things off, Great Lakes Hops just released 10 new varieties in their "Heritage collection". At the moment it looks like they are available to everyone for preorder:


GLH Arcadian
  • Light Floral and Orange/Tangerine
  • Alpha: 9.8%
  • Beta: 7.5%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 6lbs 9.8oz (wet weight)

GLH Walhalla™
  • Light Citrus w/ hint of garlic (very faint) some grassy/herbal too.
  • Alpha: 5.97 - 10%
  • Beta: 3.75 - 6%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 9lbs 4.8oz (wet weight)

GLH Prussian™
  • Lemony citrus w/ piney notes
  • Alpha: 4.29%
  • Beta: 2.73%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 3lbs 9.4oz (wet weight)

GLH Petoskey™
  • Unique floral, pungent, pineapple
  • Alpha: 12.11%
  • Beta: 6.16%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 6lbs 9.1oz (wet weight)

GLH Hartwick™
  • Piney, overripe pineapple - Distinctly different aroma profile from others in collection
  • Alpha: 12.28%
  • Beta: 5.77%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 12lbs 11.3oz (wet weight)

GLH Saugatuck™
  • Fragrant, hard to pin down but pleasant and interesting.
  • Alpha: 5.39%
  • Beta: 3.27%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 12lbs 13.1oz (wet weight)

GLH Old Mission™
  • Citrus, light pine, tea spice, herbal, pepper, tartness.
  • Alpha: 4.33%
  • Beta: 3.70%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 14lbs 11.9oz (wet weight)
GLH Shaddock™
  • Interesting lime/grapefruit, bright, - low onion/garlic.
  • Alpha: 4.96%
  • Beta: 3.59%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 7lbs 13.4oz (wet weight)

GLH Diamond Springs™
  • Citrusy/bright, lemon, mint, interesting aroma
  • Alpha: 4.83%
  • Beta: 3.18%
  • Observed First year yield (on test plant): 12lbs 9.8oz (wet weight)

GLH Lawton™
  • Pungent, woody & earthy – not citrusy – totally dank.
  • Alpha: 3.5 -4.0% from uncultivated specimen
  • Beta: 3.0-3.2
  • Yield: high – based on cone size and set on specimen plant
Clicked the link and it gave me a "Gateway Problem" and wouldn't load. Any information on the parents/genealogy for these breeds? I'm definitely interested in the Walhalla, Hartwick, and Saugatuck.
 

Apimyces

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they claim they were found on old farmsteads possibly brought by immigrants "back in the day"
I'm sure with DNA testing they can figure out if there are any relations and may have but hey, the mystery got my interest. :)

https://www.greatlakeshops.com/heritage-collection.html
Right, which, in my mind, likely means "these are widely available cultivars that would otherwise be known by other names.

I could be wrong, though, the odds of some of those being novel/rare is non-negligible, but it's almost certain that at least some of them are just stuff like Fuggles or Golding.
 

NitrogenWidget

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Right, which, in my mind, likely means "these are widely available cultivars that would otherwise be known by other names.

I could be wrong, though, the odds of some of those being novel/rare is non-negligible, but it's almost certain that at least some of them are just stuff like Fuggles or Golding.
s

Well orange/tangerine and over ripe pineapple don't sound like any known varieties.
but, i have to grow them and experience them for myself to see what they are like.
 

Apimyces

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Quick google lookup suggests a few cultivars can impart pineapple aromas.

Also, I'm not claiming that 100% of these are Fuggles, Cluster, and Goldings.

But for the one you are talking about, it says "Alpha: 12.28%". That's a LOT. Especially for a "heirloom" variety. "High alpha" bittering hops developed in the first half of the 1900s didn't even have that... Brewer's Gold averages around 9%, for example. To get over 12%, we are mostly looking at hops developed in the 1970s, stuff like Nugget or Columbus. In any case, it's certainly not Fuggles, Cluster, or Goldings, that's for sure. They do claim to verify that they aren't just misidentified common hops.

Could be an interesting cultivar, though, as might some of the others they've got there. I mean, after all, it's history and origins is of zero importance for the finished product. But I can't help but question the accuracy/veracity of many of these claims.
 

ajbosley2015

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I just purchased 3 Petoskey field grade plants last week. I'm pretty excited for this one honestly.
I've only ever grown from rhizome...but the stats and the "pungent pineapple" aroma are going to be magical in my fruited IPAs...most notably my mango.

If the pineapple comes through like one of the growers told me it would...I am hoping to try a pina colada IPA at some point...but the combination of a very high oil hop, and the oil from coconut means natural conditioning wont be an option by any means...I'm intrigued
 

ajbosley2015

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Can I store them in the fridge or plant them in pots to keep in the house and transplant in a few months?

Your plant will come with rice hulls in the bag, GLH growers recommend adding half a pound or so of moist potting soil and mixing with the rice hulls. Put some holes in the bag, and store between 45-55 degrees. If bines start forming, pinch them off until you are ready to plant. If you have already ordered...it looks like you won't get plants until the third week of april or later...so no real concern for ya
 

Apimyces

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Best is putting in the ground as soon as the weather permits, but I have a few dozen potted plants indoors hiding a few windows. ;)
 

Bender_Braus_Brewing

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Has anyone ordered/planted any of these new varieties? I'd be interested in watching their progress.
 

NitrogenWidget

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Mine came in yesterday. they are fully sprouted and now in my basement in the original box.
I'm going to build some raised beds today and plant them.
weather shouldn't get colder than 40's now.
I will cover with mulch just in case we get a final surprise frost since it has happened in April around here.
Then i'll make the trellis.
I have some steel fence top rail I can use for the sides.
 

Northern_Brewer

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weather shouldn't get colder than 40's now.
I will cover with mulch just in case we get a final surprise frost since it has happened in April around here.
Don't worry about it - hops aren't some poncey southern plant, they positively benefit from a bit of frost on them. I can't say for all the US varieties but certainly the traditional European varieties were brought up in areas that see at least -7°C (20°F) every winter, with the odd winter getting down to -15°C (5°F). At least that's true for Kent, I can't imagine it's any warmer in central Europe.

I've got some seedlings out in the open in 3" pots - no mulch or cold frame or anything, and they're still growing despite nightly frosts at the moment. OK, they would be growing faster if they were more protected or in the ground, but they're fine.
 

NitrogenWidget

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raised beds are done.
Pipes are in the ground for the 20ft. fence top rails to slide into to make up the trellis.
My aircraft wire and hardware arrived.
Going to make it so I can lower the trellis wires for harvest.
Just waiting for the darn rain to stop.

One bed is about 7ft and the other is just under 6ft due to space and where the sun hits all day.
One hop variety has 24" sidearms and the other 12" so the 24" will get the bigger bed but I think both should be fine if I just evenly space them between the center and the sides.
I've seen people here grow them just fine with less space and height.

Hops are in paint bucket liners ($6 for 5 at HD) until I can fill the bed with potting soil/dirt/ash/peat cover with mulch to get the right PH level. too bad it's been raining since and everything is a sloppy mess.

Plants are a little pale from being in the basement a few weeks but at least 7-8 inches long.
Going to pop a hole in the pots to make sure they don't drown. :)
 

ajbosley2015

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Has anyone ordered/planted any of these new varieties? I'd be interested in watching their progress.
I ordered one Petoskey field grade plant. Arrived approximately 10 inches tall from top of soil, two bines with plenty of slightly developed leaves. Put into the ground yesterday in Eastern WV. I exposed some of the root and applied Mycorrhizal inoculant directly on the root, and placed some in the hole as well. Top-filled with a 1:4 mixture of earthworm casings and topsoil respectively. The location for this one will have it running up to my 14 foot garage roof joist. It is planted directly in between 1 cascade, and 1 zeus just for some unnecessary information.

The team at GLH has guaranteed 4 pounds of cones in the first year, and said average production per plant is right around 7 pounds for the first year.

As the season progresses I will keep you updated.
 

NitrogenWidget

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Beds are full of some really nice soil with a ph of about 6. Need some snow fence. The dog keeps going into them. Have not put the plants in yet because I still need to run cable and rope. This weekend hopefully if it isn’t raining.
 

Texconsinite

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Have Shaddock and Petoskey year 2 coming in. Both produced like CRAZY last yr. Prussia were in containers and didn’t survive the winter. Just ordered Lawton to replace them, maybe “feral hops” can succeed where Prussia failed
Yesterday
IMG_1958.JPG

Last year
View attachment 627587
 
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ajbosley2015

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My year one Petoskey is now creeping on 7 ft tall and starting to really bush. Low mast on main bines, but I am assuming it is just indicative of age and root size. I am working to develop this in the future, so I want year one to be a huge success for root development. I have between 7-10 different bines all running up the coir. I am not particularly worried about cone production this year, its just a training evolution for the plant, and getting her accustomed to my soil and weather
 

NitrogenWidget

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jelly^^^^
Only one of my plants are over the two ft. mark
but I don't think they are seeing more than 6 or 7 hrs of sun and we've had cloudy rainy days the last few weeks.
 

ajbosley2015

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I planted 13, 11 rhizomes from various providers and 2 field grade plants from GLH.
1 field grade plant is at 7 feet, the other is a fuggle that is just now reaching the coir but has been a ground dweller and wrapped all around itself.

2 Crystal rhizomes that are now about 6ish feet tall and getting pretty damn healthy. (I actually purposefully planted the rhizomes side by side to make an attempt at two root balls growing together and making something interesting in a few years. These are two Crystal from one provider. My other crystal is by itself, 16 feet apart to try to see if there is a discernible difference after maturity set in

2 Zeus rhizomes at about 3-4 feet, and one Zeus had the tip break off from heavy winds

My 2 columbus are just starting to get healthy, but only at about 2 feet tall

My 1 sterling is between 2 and 3 feet

My 2 cashmere are between 3-4 feet
 

NitrogenWidget

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where are you guys located?
I'm in WNY.
How has your spring been?
Mine is pretty miserable.

however my cascade from last yr that did nothing is now about 4ft tall.
but that is in an open field and see's sun all day long.
 

ajbosley2015

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where are you guys located?
I'm in WNY.
How has your spring been?
Mine is pretty miserable.

I am in Eastern WV. So far the spring has been pretty normal for once. rain here and there, days of very hot sun. Some days the soil dries to a cracked surface, other days it stays relatively moist. Some days I have had 1 ft of growth in less than 24 hours on the Petoskey and the Crystal. However, the location of my yard is not ideal. All 13 plants are south facing, however the dual crystal and Petoskey are at opposite ends and are least shielded by shade from a massive maple tree. unfortunately, my hops in the center of the run have likely 4-5 hours of sun per day...if they are lucky. thinking about cutting down a maple tree haha
 
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