NEIPA. Oats in hop spider. Skip the mash.

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Panderson1

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Anyone else do this with rolled oats?. After mashing, and the water is heating up to boil, i add all the oats in a big hop spider. Temps around 170-190 for a few mins lettingit sit inside the kettle. . Then drain all the starchy water into the kettle. I might do this process 2 or 3 times depending on the recipe. Doing 12 gal batches mostly. Seems to be working great and eliminating the gooyee slow draining mash. Hope that make sense.

Also this makes some delicious oatmeal. Best I've had lol.
 

Brooothru

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Anyone else do this with rolled oats?. After mashing, and the water is heating up to boil, i add all the oats in a big hop spider. Temps around 170-190 for a few mins lettingit sit inside the kettle. . Then drain all the starchy water into the kettle. I might do this process 2 or 3 times depending on the recipe. Doing 12 gal batches mostly. Seems to be working great and eliminating the gooyee slow draining mash. Hope that make sense.

Also this makes some delicious oatmeal. Best I've had lol.
What a great, novel idea! It would seem like the same process could be used for any thick, sticky high protein adjunct grain like rye. Maybe put the oats in the hop spider and inbed the spider into the grain bed and mash normally, pulling it before sparging. Or maybe, after mashing out, keep the wort at mash out temperature ~70°C/165°F for :20 mins or so. Put the spider with oats/rye, etc., into the wort for extraction before the amylase enzymes denature.

Your idea might also provide a method for detoction mashes as well. Put part of the grist into a hop spider, then dough in. When it comes time to detoct, pull out the grain in the hop spider and boil it. Less muss, no fuss. I gotta' try this.

Ever since I started letting the kettle hops 'go commando', I've been trying to think of a way to re-purpose my hop spider. This might be a really good way.
 
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Panderson1

Panderson1

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water? Or wort?

Are you saying, you're not mashing those rolled oats?

I meant wort not water. Sorry.. And no the oats are soaking in the wort after the mash is finished. They are just old fashioned quick oats. I believe they're basically the same as rolled oats?
 

IslandLizard

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And no the oats are soaking in the wort after the mash is finished.
What do you think you are getting out of those oats by just soaking in hot wort?

They are just old fashioned quick oats. I believe they're basically the same as rolled oats?
Old Fashioned Oats and Quick Oats are 2 different kinds of processed oats. Old Fashioned Oats (or "flaked oats") are basically steamed then rolled with hot rollers.
Quick Oats have been heat treated (steamed) longer and are already partially cooked.

BTW, I've never had any stuck mash or slow lauter when using 10-15% of flaked/Old Fashioned oats in the mash. That's like a pound to a pound and a half in a total of 10 pounds of grist.
 
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Panderson1

Panderson1

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Sorry. I was reading quaker and "quick" must have popped in my mind. My bad. They are just quaker old fashion oats.

What would i gain soaking the oats in the mash vs right after the mash in wort at 180 degrees?
 

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IslandLizard

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What would i gain soaking the oats in the mash vs right after the mash in wort at 180 degrees?
Yeah, what would you gain?

You may get a load of suspended starches, but won't get any starch conversion using your high temp soak/steep method, because all the enzymes that would do that job have been denatured.
 

slayer021175666

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What IslandLizard is saying is, You are not getting any starch conversion steeping at that high of temp. You would need to steep at a much lower temp. Doing it in the mash is the easiest way. You aren't utilizing the sugar in the oats. Better and easier to put them in the mash tun.
 

marc1

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What IslandLizard is saying is, You are not getting any starch conversion steeping at that high of temp. You would need to steep at a much lower temp. Doing it in the mash is the easiest way. You aren't utilizing the sugar in the oats. Better and easier to put them in the mash tun.

You'd also need the enzymes from some added malt (or enzymes that you purchased) along with the lower temp.
 

slayer021175666

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You'd also need the enzymes from some added malt (or enzymes that you purchased) along with the lower temp.
Yep. Too high of temp will stop the amylase in your barley from working to convert starch to sugar.
 

Brooothru

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What IslandLizard is saying is, You are not getting any starch conversion steeping at that high of temp. You would need to steep at a much lower temp. Doing it in the mash is the easiest way. You aren't utilizing the sugar in the oats. Better and easier to put them in the mash tun.

In Post #2 I suggested that resting at ~165F could achieve what he's trying to accomplish. Beta amylase peaks at at about 145F, Alpha at around 164F. Both Beta and Alpha are pretty much denatured by 180F, so little if any conversion will be taking place at that temperature. IIRC Beta has a wider temperature range and activates first but denatures last. Alpha activates at a higher temperature but denatures lower than Beta. If he were to mash at a higher temperature like 165F he could achieve the greater body and mouthfeel promoted by Alpha amylase, which is what wants to get from oats in the grist bill.
 

Elric

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Alternatively he could do the hop spider soak of the oats while heating water up to start the mash, the sugars will be in the water ready for the enzymes to start chewing on once they make their way out of the barley.
 

Brooothru

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Alternatively he could do the hop spider soak of the oats while heating water up to start the mash, the sugars will be in the water ready for the enzymes to start chewing on once they make their way out of the barley.
As long as time and temperature are sufficient for gelatinization that would work, but at what point are you just doing two separate simultaneous mashes, only to combine both worts into one boil? Might as well just combine everything into a single mash. Saves time, effort and cleanup.
 
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