NEIPA dry hop question

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centralpabrewer

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For all you NEIPA brewers, when you dry hop do you just throw the hops right in the fermenter, or do you use a hop bag?
 

Jag75

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I use bags weighted down by stainless washers. The only time I dry hopped commando i regreted it big time. Never again for me.
 

ChiknNutz

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I've only made one NEIPA batch and used 6 oz. in a hop bag. Beer turned out great and was nice for cleanup but cannot comment on if it would have been better if done naked.
 

Stonehenge360

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I always mesh bag them since I currently have no method of cold crashing my fermenter. All depends on your setup honestly.
 

day_trippr

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^true^ "Infrastructure matters"

I do not recommend cold-crashing without the infrastructure to avoid oxygen ingress, especially with heavily hopped beers...

Cheers!
 

wepeeler

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If you can soft crash to drop yeast, do that. 58F for a few days. Dry hop naked, no bag. 48 hours is enough time to extract the oils. If you can cold crash after the 48 hr dry hop, I would recommend that as well. 2-3 days cold crash, then package.
 
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centralpabrewer

centralpabrewer

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I could do either. I am currently at ferment day 2. Just added 2oz hops. In three more days I plan to add another oz of hops for 2 or days and the cold crash.
 

wepeeler

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I could do either. I am currently at ferment day 2. Just added 2oz hops. In three more days I plan to add another oz of hops for 2 or days and the cold crash.
That's what I used to do. Now I skip dry hopping during fermentation. I soft crash the yeast out and do 1 big dry hop 48 hours before I plan to keg. Although next time I plan to DH for 48 hours after soft crashing and then cold crash to 35 for a few days to get the hops out of suspension. I had a clogged keg post last time after only soft crashing and DHing for 48 hours.
 

JustSomeChef

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Hi guys! I am on my fourth batch, an NEIPA extract kit. I’m on my fifth day of primary fermentation, and am reading up on all the different opinions and viewpoints of dry hopping. I am bottling and don’t have any co2 contraptions. I’m terrified of oxidizing this beer as it took a long time to get to this point. Seems to be differing opinions on when to dry hop: primary or secondary?

I have an idea to leave it in the primary bottling bucket and dry hop 5 days before bottling, then cold crash in an ice bath (very limited resources where I live) for a day or two to compact the trube. I’ve read about dry hopping in primary to prevent oxidation and off flavors, and also read that dry hopping for too long can cause grassy/off flavor problems. I’ve also read that a transfer to secondary is completely unnecessary for homebrewing unless adding some other form of sugar or fruit or whatever to ferment.

Seems like a transfer to secondary might present a greater chance for oxidation than popping the top of my fermenter for a minute and dry hopping a few days before cold crashing and bottling. (I have pellets and no hop sock or cheesecloth just FYI).

Any thought or opinions greatly valued and appreciated!!
 

wepeeler

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Hi guys! I am on my fourth batch, an NEIPA extract kit. I’m on my fifth day of primary fermentation, and am reading up on all the different opinions and viewpoints of dry hopping. I am bottling and don’t have any co2 contraptions. I’m terrified of oxidizing this beer as it took a long time to get to this point. Seems to be differing opinions on when to dry hop: primary or secondary?

I have an idea to leave it in the primary bottling bucket and dry hop 5 days before bottling, then cold crash in an ice bath (very limited resources where I live) for a day or two to compact the trube. I’ve read about dry hopping in primary to prevent oxidation and off flavors, and also read that dry hopping for too long can cause grassy/off flavor problems. I’ve also read that a transfer to secondary is completely unnecessary for homebrewing unless adding some other form of sugar or fruit or whatever to ferment.

Seems like a transfer to secondary might present a greater chance for oxidation than popping the top of my fermenter for a minute and dry hopping a few days before cold crashing and bottling. (I have pellets and no hop sock or cheesecloth just FYI).

Any thought or opinions greatly valued and appreciated!!
Welcome!

Botting this style isn't ideal, but it can be done. Absolutely skip the secondary. DHing for 5 days isn't long enough to extract grassy flavors. However, recent research shows shorter times (24-48 hours) are enough to extract the oils. Definitely cold crash before bottling to drop out as many hop particles as possible, but be careful with suck back. Negative pressure can pull in your airlock solution (and oxygen).
 

JustSomeChef

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Welcome!

Botting this style isn't ideal, but it can be done. Absolutely skip the secondary. DHing for 5 days isn't long enough to extract grassy flavors. However, recent research shows shorter times (24-48 hours) are enough to extract the oils. Definitely cold crash before bottling to drop out as many hop particles as possible, but be careful with suck back. Negative pressure can pull in your airlock solution (and oxygen).
Thanks for your help!! I think I will try this. Another forum told me not to cold crash but I think it will help compact all the particulates. I’m not particularly concerned about color or clarity at this point, just don’t want an oxidized brew. Any tips on how to avoid negative pressure when cold crashing?
 

wepeeler

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Thanks for your help!! I think I will try this. Another forum told me not to cold crash but I think it will help compact all the particulates. I’m not particularly concerned about color or clarity at this point, just don’t want an oxidized brew. Any tips on how to avoid negative pressure when cold crashing?
You can certainly skip the cold crash. That way you're not introducing oxygen. Just be careful not to suck up a ton of debris from the bottom when bottling.
 

JustSomeChef

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suggest you pour that sample into your testing jar and then you have an accurate comparison.
Thanks! I actually poured the fg sample from my testing jar into that glass. I don’t know if it’s the lighting or what. I’m guessing I’m overthinking😂😂
 

DuncB

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you look thru a lot less beer in the sight glass. Neipa is tricky stuff and sensitive to technique think it can find flaws in process you didn't know you had. What's it like to taste and with more light behind it?
It's really all about the taste though.
I dry hopped this on day five for 14 days total and a second dry hop when cooled to 14 celsius for 9 days. No grassy notes.
IMG_20210505_162246.jpg
But I find beer very difficult to get a good photo taken.
 

JustSomeChef

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you look thru a lot less beer in the sight glass. Neipa is tricky stuff and sensitive to technique think it can find flaws in process you didn't know you had. What's it like to taste and with more light behind it?
It's really all about the taste though.
Interesting I didn’t think about that. The glass was very thick comparatively. As far as I could tell, and I’m a noob for sure, it tasted like it was headed in the right direction. No tannins, a fairly aggressive hop profile, kind of biscuity malt character, a bit of sharpness on the finish which I’ve experienced with other fg samples I’ve tasted. I may pull another sample over the next few days and see what’s happening, though I’m kinda clumsy and don’t want to risk accidental sloshing. I had no idea this was such a delicate and complex style to make. It’s one of my favorites to drink, was just introduce to it last year.
 

JustSomeChef

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you look thru a lot less beer in the sight glass. Neipa is tricky stuff and sensitive to technique think it can find flaws in process you didn't know you had. What's it like to taste and with more light behind it?
It's really all about the taste though.
I dry hopped this on day five for 14 days total and a second dry hop when cooled to 14 celsius for 9 days. No grassy notes.
View attachment 728886
But I find beer very difficult to get a good photo taken.
I don’t know man, that’s a beaut!!
 

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