Need some help

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jeepinxj

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So I am trying a batch of American pale ale. I am going to make a part whole grain mash. Here is what I have.

6lbs light dry malt extract
.25lbs Vienna
.25lbs Belgian
.50lbs Munich

2oz cascade leaf
2oz citra pellets

1oz lemon peel

I am needing some help with times of boil etc. I have never used actual grains before only used extract. Any help would be awesome.
 

brewkinger

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So I am trying a batch of American pale ale. I am going to make a part whole grain mash. Here is what I have.

6lbs light dry malt extract
.25lbs Vienna
.25lbs Belgian
.50lbs Munich

2oz cascade leaf
2oz citra pellets

1oz lemon peel

I am needing some help with times of boil etc. I have never used actual grains before only used extract. Any help would be awesome.
Pretty basic really. As far as boil times, 60 minute is the norm; specifically this recipe, 60 min would be just right.

As far as "actual grains" go in this recipe, we call what you have here an extract with steeping grains recipe.

Did this come in a kit?
If so then most kits include a muslin bag (or bag of some sort) that you put the crushed grains (they are crushed already RIGHT??)
If you do not have a bag, you need a way to essentially steep these like a tea bag.

Lets start there, do you have the bag?
:confused:
 
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jeepinxj

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This is not a kit just trying different things. I have bags and no the grains are still whole.
 

homebrewmike

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If you don't have a grain mill, I've heard of people using a gallon zip lock bag and a rolling pin to mill the grains.
 
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jeepinxj

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Cascade is 4.5-6 have to look at the citra again
 

brewkinger

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OK.
Crush the grains.
Did you purchase the ingredients at LHBS? If so, they probably will crush them for you if you go back. While you are there, pick up a muslin grain bag (or grain sock)
If no LHBS, go to Home Depot or Lowes and in the paint section look for a paint strainer bag. Nothing too large, as you have only a couple # of grains there.

Put the crushed grains in the bag, and about 2-3 quarts of water in your kettle. Heat the water up to about 150-160 degrees and keep the temp constant.
Steep the grains in the bag in that water for about 20-30 minutes, move the bag around occasionally to allow the flavors and colors (sugars) to come out.
You especially want to move the bag around if you are continuously heating the kettle, so that they do not burn to the bottom of the kettle.

After that, you can squeeze the bag out, or put it in a strainer above the kettle and rinse with more water until you get to your preboil volume in your kettle.

Start heating to boil.
Once boiling, (here is where people vary, and this is what I would do)
Add half the DME, and the 60 minute hop addition. (either take it off the heat and stir in or stir like mad when adding to prevent scorching to the kettle bottom)
Add the remaining hops at the correct times.
Add the remaining DME when the 60 minute boil is done (again with heat off, we call this "AT FLAMEOUT")

Voila' u have made wort.:D
 
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jeepinxj

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Wow! That is perfect thank you for your help.
 
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jeepinxj

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Is this too much room? Should I add water or will it be ok?
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1389327756.961397.jpg
 
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Yeah that's not a lot of headspace. I'd rig a blowoff tube on that sucker before you're scrubbing it off your walls and ceiling. Just take tubing and insert one end into the stopper and the other into a container half filled with water/sanitizer I use starsan in my airlocks. And let it ferment with that setup for a few days or till it's done whichever you prefer. If the airlock gets clogged by the krausen that will develop in active fermentation it could cause it to violently expel the fermenting wort, yeast, hops, trub, etc etc all over the place and nobody want to clean that kind if mess. There are plenty if horror story threads here about the clogged airlocks and the disasters that followed shorty after.
 
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jeepinxj

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So I started my brew on Thursday and it has slowed bubbling through my air lock. Is that normal? I did not have my hydrometer bc it broke.... Any suggestions should I leave it? Was thinking about adding some honey to bring up the content but idk
 
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Yeah that's normal activity. After the first few days the active part of fermentation completes. Then it will start to clean up and settle out the debris that is still making it cloudy. Usually let it sit 2-3weeks then bottle or keg. I think without knowing where your at ABV wise I don't think I would add any fermentables at this point. If you know your ABV is going to be low it wouldn't hurt if you want to add more sugars to increase the ABV. Just keep in mind adding too much sugars will thin and dry out the beer some. Again though without knowing how high or low your final gravity is I think I would hold off I. Adding anything else to your brew. After fermentation is over and the trub settles out give it a taste and see if you like it the way it is. If not you can always rack it into more fermentables then and go for a second fermentation cycle.
 
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Sure. Welcome to the addiction. Start planning the next brew now to get your pipeline built up that way you won't be tempted to rush/play with the beer you have now and will give it plenty of conditioning time (always hard on the first one). Eventually you will have beer at all stages of fermentation so you won't be hurriedly awaiting the completion if one batch. The first one is always the hardest. As you want to keep checking and watching to make sure it's going ok. Step away from the fermenter and go grab a cold commercial brew otherwise referred to "research and development" for the next brew. Lolol. Good luck with the beer. So far so good.
 
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jeepinxj

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Ya started my second batch a little to late already drank all 5 gallons of the first batch. I could not believe how good it was. Starting another on Thursday. Going to all grain next rather than partial mash
 
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Yeah. Plenty of different ways around the problem if having good beer. Deciding in a recipe is always the hardest for. All the beer(so far anyway) has been markedly better than the commercial beer around so much nicer to have a cold one knowing EVERYTHING that went in to making it. Makes it all worthwhile. Love the process and enjoy making beer. Plus get the added bonus of a bunch of fresh beers to consume also. Everybody wins. Woohoo.
 
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jeepinxj

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Very true I tried a variety pack of anchor and my beer was amazing compared to them all.
 
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