my wine has gas in it, can i get rid of it?

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SAM11111

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Hello,

I made about 18 bottles of elderflower wine 2 months ago and opened one last night (i couldn't wait any longer) and it was ever so slightly bubbly.

If I open all my other bottles and let the gas leave can I rebottle them again and have wine ready for christmas?

Kind regards,
Sam.
 

pvtpublic

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Yes, but you're going to risk oxidation and contamination in the process. Keep them as cold as you can to prevent them from carbing more, and degas while serving. That will be your safest route.
 
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SAM11111

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Yes, but you're going to risk oxidation and contamination in the process. Keep them as cold as you can to prevent them from carbing more, and degas while serving. That will be your safest route.
Thanks for that. I'll leave them as they are. It's might first attempt so I'm not expecting much anyway, cheers.
 

z-bob

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You can pretend it's supposed to be like that. A lof of wines from southern Europe are slightly sparkling. (there's fancy word for it but I can't think of it)
 

bernardsmith

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I make my elderflower wine as a still wine but in the UK elderflower wine is often called "elderflower champagne" because it is bottled before it has fully fermented, and so is very sparkling... (NOT a good idea , in my opinion, because you have little or no control over the amount of CO2 the yeast will produce in the sealed bottle and so no control over the pressure the CO2 will exert and the effects of that pressure on the bottle - and if glass , whether it will result in bottle bombs). BUT all that said, best approach if you want a still rather than a petillant (is that the word you were looking for z-bob? wine, is to allow the wine to bulk age in a carboy with an airlock so that the gas will be expelled over time. And if you don't have the patience to wait you can help the gas expel by increasing the temperature of the room a few degrees (warmer liquid cannot hold as much gas) and stir the wine either by hand or with an electric drill (there are stirring rods designed for drills). A third method is to pull a vacuum over the carboy to extract the CO2.
 

Danny spain

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You can pretend it's supposed to be like that. A lof of wines from southern Europe are slightly sparkling. (there's fancy word for it but I can't think of it)

You can pretend it's supposed to be like that. A lof of wines from southern Europe are slightly sparkling. (there's fancy word for it but I can't think of it)
In the Basque region here in Spain they have a wine type called Txakoli that's like this. For me it's kind of like a softer wine cooler
 
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In the Basque region here in Spain they have a wine type called Txakoli that's like this. For me it's kind of like a softer wine cooler

That is exactly what the effect of gas in wine is - it becomes bubbly with the accompanying co2 bite, and becomes a wine cooler. It's not bad, if you like wine coolers.

I find that the gas leaves it pretty quickly, so if you let it sit a minute it will become wine again. I'm in the middle of this situation right now.
 

Henbrew

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My current batch of Malbec has a slight bit of carbonation in the bottles as well. I decant it into a carafe about 30min before drinking it. Works pretty well.

I need to work on my degassing...
 

Coffee49

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Degassing too intensly can also risk O2 contamination. I add 1/4 tsp. of sullfite and whip the final product for 5 min. Then bottle.
 
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