My stout is sour!

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Nugent

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I've been holding off with posting about this, but things aren't getting any better. I hoped to never have to post a "Is this infected?" post, but I'm guessing that I'm part of the club now :cross:

Brewed an all-grain dry stout with a buddy about seven weeks ago. Brew day went without a hitch. Primary with Wyeast Irish for a week at about 68*-70* F; three weeks in secondary at about 68* F. Racked to bottling bucket (primed with corn sugar) about three weeks ago; tasted fantastic out of secondary - strong roasted flavour with a clean, dry after taste. Was very excited, especially since I reckoned that it'd be good enough for St. Pat's.

Anyhoo, been trying it for the last week and it's sour as f***. Sour at the back of the tongue that sucks at your saliva glands sour. I'm thinking infection.

I'm really disappointed as I was absolutely loving it out of primary and now is basically undrinkable (although it did make a fantastic lamb stew on St. Patty's!)

Beyond letting it go for another month and trying it, do you have any thoughts? I can post the recipe, but the fact that it was magical coming out of secondary makes me think that something happened in the bottling process. Used 3/4 cup of dextrose, boiled it, let it cool and pourred into bottling bucket (no physical mixing). Sanitised bottles with Aseptox solution (used it for a mild ale afterwards without problems).

Yup, sour. Just took another sip. Yuck!

Save it or bury it at sea?
 

GunnerMan

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Save it and pasturize it, then make an Ode to Arthur guinness clone and add some of it to your new brew in secondary/at bottling. It might make for one hellofa guinness clone...
 

Saccharomyces

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Lacto takes a long time to get a foothold.

I'd brew up another batch and blend, but it isn't possible if you are a bottler.. you'd need to stabilize the soured beer to prevent a runaway lacto infection in the blended brew, and that process would kill any yeast and prevent it from carbing.
 

GunnerMan

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Why can't he stabilize and then blend it in the secondary with good yeast to bottle.
 
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