My first time Brewing a "Brewer's Best" Beer Kit Hefe?

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Brews-n-Blues

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Hello out there in Brewville!
I'm Brewing a Hefeweizen style Brew for the first time. It's a "Brewer's Best" Brew kit. Anyway, I've read before that you shouldn't transfer to secondary, like the instructions suggest, but rather leave it in primary until bottling time?
Is this accurate?
If so, do you tell by gravity readings when to bottle or some other way?
It's now day 7 and it's still bubbling happy, but slower.
My OG reading of 1.112 was from the wort before deluting it with water, to the 5 gallon mark. Once fermentation started, it was going pretty good!
I had to put a "dump-tube" set-up on it to avoid a blow-off? I take it, this is a norm for this type of Brew?
Are there any other tips from the community for Brewing this style of Beer? I've been doing a lot of Meads and Wines lately and would like to get more into Brewing Beers in the future!
Cheers to the Craft!!
Rock
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hout17

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Leave it in primary until bottling. Next time take the gravity reading after dilution and make sure it's mixed well so you know what the starting gravity is.

Leave it fermenting for at least two weeks then take gravity readings and if they are consistent for three days then time to bottle.

Brew on!
 

D.B.Moody

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Welcome to the beer side.:)
I'm probably not the best guy to tell you about secondaries, because I generally do a secondary, but I think your hefeweizen will be better off left in the primary.
I'm probably not the guy to tell you about gravity readings, because I haven't done one since 2009, but I will tell you that you should read the instructions, because you seem to be doing it wrong.
You bottle when the beer is done fermenting. Don't even think about it until it's been two weeks. I would suggest three if you leave it in the primary and you can't actually see it in there.

Edit: @hout17 posted while I was writing the above. He gave you good advice.
 
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Imhoppy

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Skip the secondary.

I'm never in a hurry with fermentation due to good planning in maintaining a constant supply of brew. I typically have a 28 day primary fermentation schedule. At first, I did secondary fermentations, but after a few brews, I decided that extra step did not really do anything but waste time and effort. The 28 day primary gives plenty of time to help clarify the beer before kegging. I would never go back to doing a secondary. I also don't bother taking any extra gravity readings except for the initial (before yeast pitch) and final (in the keg) values.

On occasion, I have had to install a blow-off tube on my Big Mouth Bubbler when the yeast really takes off. Usually I don't need to do this. However, I always keep a close eye on what happens shortly after yeast pitch to make sure all will be good, just in case a blow-off is required.

FWIW, my experience level is currently at 75 batches. Mostly extract brews (5 gallon), but now doing BIAB.
 

kartracer2

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The previous posters answered your questions well but I will try to expand a bit on them using my experience as reference.
As an extract brewer if you use all the ingredients in the recipe kit your OG will be right with in a point or two, not a big deal. (make sure you make any hydro temp corrections if needed) And yes you need to mix your boiled wort and your top off water well if you chose to take a OG reading before the main ferment
As far as secondary, I stopped using them for 90% of my beers. Generally only needed if adding any thing after the main ferment. Some ppl still use them and they have their reasons, not worthy of debate here as there are many threads on the forum for that.
The beer is done when it's done. I don't have a set time frame but I let it set a couple of days after it stop burping and the kaursen drops before I take a gravity reading. I wait another couple of days and check again. If they are the same the beer is probably done. With wheat beers I don't feel they get any better by letting them sit like some bigger, more complex beers do. Package it after the gravity is stable. Clarity is not an issue with a Hefe. YMMV.
Wheat beers are famous for having a large krausen when using a typical Hefe yeast. (Munich Classic, 3068, etc.) Even in my 6gal Fermonster I use/need a blow off tube for wheat beers. I wouldn't make a wheat beer with out one. Also the warmer the ferment temp the more krausen.
I have a Hefe going as we speak and it's as happy as a pig in poo @ 70.5*F
Cheers and good luck!, :mug:
Joel B.
 

seabrew8

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What temperature is it fermenting at? You can visually tell when the fermentation is done most of the time. The foam will drop out.

Most ales yeasts will ferment out in 10 days easy with medium original gravity. 1.050 for example.

When i was a teenager - over 20 years ago - i literally made dozens of kit beer before i even owned a hydrometer. i used to sell it to my friends lol
 
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Brews-n-Blues

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Leave it in primary until bottling. Next time take the gravity reading after dilution and make sure it's mixed well so you know what the starting gravity is.

Leave it fermenting for at least two weeks then take gravity readings and if they are consistent for three days then time to bottle.

Brew on!
Leave it in primary until bottling. Next time take the gravity reading after dilution and make sure it's mixed well so you know what the starting gravity is.

Leave it fermenting for at least two weeks then take gravity readings and if they are consistent for three days then time to bottle.

Brew on!
Thank you for the info!
Much appreciated!
I usually do take the reading after I dillute? It turned into a crazy day on Brew day this time around? I'll definitely remember next time!
Cheers!!
🍺😎
 
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Brews-n-Blues

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Welcome to the beer side.:)
I'm probably not the best guy to tell you about secondaries, because I generally do a secondary, but I think your hefeweizen will be better off left in
Thank you for the info!
Much appreciated!
I usually do take the reading after I dillute? It turned into a crazy day on Brew day this time around? I'll definitely remember next time!
Cheers!!
🍺😎
the primary.
I'm probably not the guy to tell you about gravity readings, because I haven't done one since 2009, but I will tell you that you should read the instructions, because you seem to be doing it wrong.
You bottle when the beer is done fermenting. Don't even think about it until it's been two weeks. I would suggest three if you leave it in the primary and you can't actually see it in there.

Edit: @hout17 posted while I was writing the above. He gave you good advice.
Your input is much appreciated!
I want to learn how to Brew perfect,
since this is one of my favs!
Thank you!
Cheers!!
🍺😎
 
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Brews-n-Blues

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Your input is much appreciated!
I want to learn how to Brew perfect,
since this is one of my favs!
Thank you!
Cheers!!
🍺😎
 

micraftbeer

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I haven't brewed many hefeweizens, but I come across articles a lot that emphasize fermentation aspects to tune the flavors. Since you said this is your favorite style, I recommend you research hefeweizen yeast fermentation temperature. I recall fermenting warmer brings out more banana flavor, cooler has more clove flavor (but I might be wrong, so Google it). I've also seen that Hefe flavors benefit from underpitching the yeast (less than a typical ale).
 
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Brews-n-Blues

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I haven't brewed many hefeweizens, but I come across articles a lot that emphasize fermentation aspects to tune the flavors. Since you said this is your favorite style, I recommend you research hefeweizen yeast fermentation temperature. I recall fermenting warmer brings out more banana flavor, cooler has more clove flavor (but I might be wrong, so Google it). I've also seen that Hefe flavors benefit from underpitching the yeast (less than a typical ale).
I appreciate your info!
I'm learning a lot during this process!
Cheers to the Craft!!
🍺😎
Thank you!
 
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