My first "good" homebrew + a general question

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homebrewer72

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Hey all, this is my first post and I hope this is in the right section!

So far I have made 2 batches of beer. The first was from a kit which yielded 1 gallon, and it turned out terrible with way too much sediment and incredibly overcarbonated (but somehow none of them were bombs! :drunk: ) The second batch turned out just amazing, couldn't have asked for a better brew based on the style I was going for. My success is in huge part due to the vast amount of information I found on these forums... so thank you for that.

Here is the brew I made- it is an English Brown Ale with ingredients I gathered from "My Old Kentucky Homebrew" in Louisville, KY (great store).


I did have a general question, that seems a little silly but I'm really curious about. I have noticed that most beers, especially my homebrew, taste *much* better directly out of the bottle than when poured into a glass. I cannot taste the beer nearly as well when poured into a glass- it almost tastes bland. I know a lot of people get upset when "good" beer is consumed directly from the bottle, but I just think it tastes so much better! I've noticed this with almost every beer, from Brown Ales to IPAs.

Has anyone else had this experience or is it just me?

Thanks for taking the time to read, and cheers! :mug:
 

geer537

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Look out behind you!

Lame joke- sorry. Couldn't resist with the reflection... I would guess it is based off of the glassware used. I've had an IPA out of a pint glass and out of a tulip glass- same beer, vastly different nose and taste. Also could be residue from the soap used to clean the glass. Just guesses. My favorite go to glass (not beer)

 

kombat

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I have noticed that most beers, especially my homebrew, taste *much* better directly out of the bottle than when poured into a glass. I cannot taste the beer nearly as well when poured into a glass- it almost tastes bland.
Maybe you REALLY like the flavour of yeast?

I'm assuming you're bottle-carbing (based in the fact that it's only your second batch, and you made a reference to overcarbing and bottle bombs for your first batch). In that case, if you're drinking right from the bottle, then you're re-mixing in the sediment (yeast) that settles to the bottom of the bottle and is usually (deliberately) left behind when pouring the beer into a glass. The result is your beer would have a much more yeasty flavour, not to mention a cloudy appearance, but that would not be readily apparent if you're using conventional brown beer bottles.

Most people don't enjoy the flavour and chunky texture that is characteristic of yeast sediment in bottle-carbed beers.
 
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homebrewer72

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I would guess it is based off of the glassware used.
That actually does make sense- I hadn't thought of that. Looks like quality beer glasses are just one more thing I need to spend money on in this newfound homebrewing addiction. :smack: :D

Maybe you REALLY like the flavour of yeast?

I'm assuming you're bottle-carbing (based in the fact that it's only your second batch, and you made a reference to overcarbing and bottle bombs for your first batch). In that case, if you're drinking right from the bottle, then you're re-mixing in the sediment (yeast) that settles to the bottom of the bottle and is usually (deliberately) left behind when pouring the beer into a glass. The result is your beer would have a much more yeasty flavour, not to mention a cloudy appearance, but that would not be readily apparent if you're using conventional brown beer bottles.

Most people don't enjoy the flavour and chunky texture that is characteristic of yeast sediment in bottle-carbed beers.
Maybe that is true, I haven't thought of that either. I used a prim, second, and finally a bottling bucket in the brewing process, which caused my beer to have little to no sediment when it finally came to the bottling process (unlike my first batch), so there definitely wasn't a chunky texture that I have noticed in the first gallon or so of my beer that I've tried. I also haven't noticed any kind of sediment in the beers that I pour into glasses, but then again it is a pretty dark beer so maybe I'm just not seeing it!
 

geer537

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I wouldn't go nuts buying every style glass out there. Figure out what you like to drink and brew most and get a glass that suits it. Also, they break so don't get too attached :drunk:

Who knows- try a different glass and if you still like bottles- drink bottles. No one should judge you- drink what you like.
 

kombat

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I used a prim, second, and finally a bottling bucket in the brewing process, which caused my beer to have little to no sediment when it finally came to the bottling process
Right. But more sediment is PRODUCED during bottle conditioning.

The way bottle-carbing works (as you know) is that right before bottling, you mix a small amount of sugar into your beer, then immediately bottle the beer. The yeast react to this new helping of sugar by going through another small fermentation cycle. That is, they multiply, eat the sugar (converting it into alcohol and CO2, which is what carbonates your beer since the bottle is sealed and the CO2 has nowhere to go) and precipitate out.

Once they've consumed all the priming sugar, they once again go dormant, and settle to the bottom of the bottle.

This is an inescapable fact of bottle-carbing. There WILL BE yeast and sediment at the bottom of each bottle, as a byproduct of the bottle carbing process. No matter how clear your beer was going into the bottles, the yeast will multply and precipitate out as sediment during bottle carbing. It's unavoidable, and it's why bottle-carbed beers are served in a glass. Even some old-school mainstream breweries use bottle-carbing, and warn you about the sediment in the bottle. The phrase to look for on the label is that the beer is served "on lees," meaning sediment/yeast.

I also haven't noticed any kind of sediment in the beers that I pour into glasses, but then again it is a pretty dark beer so maybe I'm just not seeing it!
That's probably it. With bottle-carbed beers, the procedure is to chill the beer for a few days to allow the yeast and sediment to settle on the bottom after having been shaken up into solution during transportation and handling. Then you uncap it and gently pour it into a glass, leaving the last 1/2" or so of beer behind in the bottle.
 
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homebrewer72

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Thanks for the awesome information- I had no idea sediment was produced because of the bottling carbonation process. You'll have to excuse my lack of knowledge about all this- very new to everything! So maybe you're right, I might just like the yeasty flavor. :mug:
 

ny101

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Yeast flavor, commonly known as "yeast bite" has a bitter flavor to it, a very sharp one. What I would do if I were you is try to identify this flavor in a bottle vs in the lack of it in a glass. If you do prefer this flavor, that probably means you would like to reproduce it. The closest way to do this is 1) just mix in the yeast when you pour the glass (this would make me fart all week). Alternatively, you can bump up your 60min additions to boost the sharp bitterness (certain hops give a sharper bitterness than others).
 
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homebrewer72

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Guys, I tried another one of my beers tonight to see this yeast you all were talking about. Turn out- it definitely is there! I poured most of my beer into the glass, then swirled the bottle around to get that good ol' yeast mixed in, and poured the rest of the beer in--- DELICIOUS! That was definitely the trick to make it taste like it does in the bottle! :mug:

I would like to hear more about how to get this flavor to come out more, like ny101 was saying? Just boil it for longer than the 60 min? Or different hops? Do you know what hops could replicate this deeply bitter flavor similar to the yeast bite like you were saying?
 

saeroner

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then swirled the bottle around to get that good ol' yeast mixed in, and poured the rest of the beer in--- DELICIOUS!
LMAO haha what?

How many beer do you drink a night like that? You notice anything different in bowel movements? or gas? just curious (serious).
 
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homebrewer72

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I agree, it does seem weird but it was really good! I love very bitter flavors in my beers and adding the rest of that yeast in gave me just the flavor I was looking for. I had 2 16-oz beers last night with adding the yeast in, didn't notice any difference in bowel movement! :D

But I would like to have my next batch already have that flavor that adding the yeast in gives me so I don't have to do that every time (kind of gross to see it floating around the beer :fro: )... Any recommendations on hops/different methods?
 

prohl84

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LMAO haha what?

How many beer do you drink a night like that? You notice anything different in bowel movements? or gas? just curious (serious).
Diet and existing gut flora are a factor. That being said I don't try to avoid yeast sediments and I rarely have any problems. Meals that day matter the most- the worst is if I have nothing but beer for dinner.

Yeast is good for you= beer is good for you. :mug:

It's my favorite fungus.


OP: Certain yeasts have different characteristics so it depends on which one you are using. I am not sure that you can get the flavor you want without adding the sediment. Yeast type, fermentation temperature, and (lowered) pitch rate are probably your best variables to play with.
 

sappnasty

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Dude! I have been wondering wtf is wrong with me! Since I got my brew kit for Christmas, I have been drinking more beer than usual for the bottles. Well I have always swirled a bottle for the sediment in brews that have it, but recently my wife has been like...wth is wrong with you. I have been gassin up a storm the last few weeks...all day, all night. I can't believe I never thought of that. Is it because they still ferment while being digested?

-Sapp
 

skitter

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Dude! I have been wondering wtf is wrong with me! Since I got my brew kit for Christmas, I have been drinking more beer than usual for the bottles. Well I have always swirled a bottle for the sediment in brews that have it, but recently my wife has been like...wth is wrong with you. I have been gassin up a storm the last few weeks...all day, all night. I can't believe I never thought of that. Is it because they still ferment while being digested?

-Sapp
Yes, if I drink a new beer vs. an old beer my wife wants me to sleep on the couch... Letting the yeast settle out and keeping it in the bottle vs. my glass is definitely more helpful to my marriage...
 

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