My final wish...

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Airborneguy

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Ok, I broke down and I'm making my own heat stick.

My final wish before I die is that someone tells me how large of a batch a 1500w element can be expected to boil. Thanks again and wish me luck.
 

Yooper

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I can't help (much) because I don't know. I will tell you that with a 1500 watt element in my HLT, it took 90 minutes to go from 60 degrees to 180 with 7 gallons of water.

I'm sure there are smart people who can do the calculation for you!
 

showdown496

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I just built an electric brew kettle out of a 32 qt aluminum turkey pot. I used 2 1500watt elements. I sit the pot on my electric stove, plug in both elements and turn the stove to high. I can go from 60 to boiling in 25 minutes. then I can turn the stove off and unplug 1 element and continue to keep a rolling boil for 60 minutes with just 1 1500w element. This is a ~6 gallon boil. Hope that helps. BTW this is no reason to die!
 

CGVT

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I use a couple of 2000w heatsticks to supplement propane. It takes a looooooong time to get 7 gallons to a boil for a 5 gallon batch with one. I usually use propane and the heat sticks to get to a quick boil and then go to one heatstick to boil.

I also use one in my HLT for my sparge water. I can get tap water to sparge temp in less than an hour. I have also used one to bring the temperature of my mash up if I undershoot or am losing temp too fast

I don't know it that helps you or not...
 
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Airborneguy

Airborneguy

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Thanks guys, your info does help.

I think I'm going to have to build another one for my purposes. I will be brewing a lot of 3 gallon batches also, which this one stick should be able to handle, especially if I use my stove to help.
 

DeafSmith

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According to my calculations, the best you can do with 1500 watts - assuming that you have no heat loss to the outside is:

minutes to raise G gallons by T degrees F. = 0.0977 * G * T.

So, for example, to raise 7 gallons from room temp. by 100ºF would take:
0.0977 * 7 * 100 = 68.4 minutes. It will actually take longer - how much longer depends on how much heat you lose from your vessel.
 

Shooter

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I don't think it would be realistic to expect a seven or so gallon boil, for a five gallon batch, to be done with only a 1500 watt heatstick. I use one to speed up the heating of my mash and sparge water. I've started with the heatstick on its own and it would have taken a long time just to get up to the temps I need to mash. I only use it to supplement my propane.
 

showdown496

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I swear I just did it last weekend guys! I used 2 1500w elements and my stovetop to get to a boil and then 1 1500w element to keep the boil going! It was in my house, with a range hood going, and no lid or any insulation on the pot! It worked great!
 

Shooter

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I swear I just did it last weekend guys! I used 2 1500w elements and my stovetop to get to a boil and then 1 1500w element to keep the boil going! It was in my house, with a range hood going, and no lid or any insulation on the pot! It worked great!
It might be able to maintain a five gallon boil. The bigger issue is getting up to boil. As you note, you used two heat sticks and the stove burner to do that.
 
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Airborneguy

Airborneguy

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It worked by the way. I just got finished testing it out. I'm going to add more epoxy to some spots though and let it cure more before using it next week.
 
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Airborneguy

Airborneguy

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Ok, take that back, it DIDN'T WORK. Well sort of. Some how the damn thing worked and I didn't get electrocuted, nor did the socket trip. BUT, when I went to take it out of the bucket, I heard something and noticed that the stick was much heavier than when I put it in. The damn thing was nearly FULL of water! How the hell the water didn't get to the wires I'll never know. I'm going to take the whole thing about and re-weld it with actual JB Weld. The guy at Home Depot told me the Goop stuff I bought was the same thing. Yeah, guess not.
 

ThreeDogsNE

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I have 4 1500 watt heatsticks. I used to use them to boil 12 gallons or so, brewing 10 gallon batches. I used JB weld on the back of the element, then some RTV silicone caulk liberally on the front after they were mounted in the drain pipe. They have plenty of brews on them, and the caulk has gone from colorless to light brown, but is has never leaked. You just need to give it about a week to cure before using it unless you're brewing a sour beer, as it gives off a vinegar aroma.

I was convinced they had to have 12 gauge wire. The extension cords I used were probably the biggest expense of the project.
 
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Airborneguy

Airborneguy

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Question: I'm going to re-weld this thing tomorrow with JB weld, like I should have originally. Should I peel the off the other stuff or can I go over it?
 

kpr121

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You should get that thing cleaned up as much as possible. In fact it might be wise to scrap any pieces that have that goop stuff on it and replace with new pieces so that you are ensuring that the JB Weld adheres/bonds to the piece itself instead of the goop which may or may not be bonded.

Oh and I believes this is the first time this has been said:
GFCI!
 

Lou1998

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I use two 1500w heatsticks for my 5 gallon batches and it works great. I get a steady rolling boil in my kettle and don't need to use a stove. Just be sure to plug them into separate circuits on separate breakers.
I saw another website that recommended you use acetone to thin out the JB weld and then pour it into the heatstick so it completely covers the element connections. I did this and it worked really well. It will just take longer to cure and you have to make sure to keep the heatstick in one place so the JB weld won't run out.
 

ChuckO

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I use two 1500w heatsticks for my 5 gallon batches and it works great. I get a steady rolling boil in my kettle and don't need to use a stove. Just be sure to plug them into separate circuits on separate breakers.
I saw another website that recommended you use acetone to thin out the JB weld and then pour it into the heatstick so it completely covers the element connections. I did this and it worked really well. It will just take longer to cure and you have to make sure to keep the heatstick in one place so the JB weld won't run out.
Don't thin the JB Weld too much. It tends to shrink and crack if it's thinned very much.
 

CGVT

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FWIW, after I screwed up and thinned the JB weld so much that it wouldn't cure, I cleaned it all off and made my heatsticks with only silicone. I haven't had any problems with them.
 

lschiavo

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FWIW, after I screwed up and thinned the JB weld so much that it wouldn't cure, I cleaned it all off and made my heatsticks with only silicone. I haven't had any problems with them.
I have actually never built a heatstick. But what fool wouln't take electrical advice from a couple stooges?:drunk:
 
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