My airlock exploded !!!

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PierreLo

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Hi,

I have experienced something for the first time today.
My fermentation was so strong that my airlock exploded.
I knew how to deal with with ... I have connect a vinyl tubing to my airlock and put the end of the tube under water.
Problem solved :)

But it got me thinking.
This is always a potential risk (airlock explosion), so should I always use setup like this up front to prevent airlock explosion.
Any thought on that ?

Thanks :)
 

Sammy86

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Hi,

I have experienced something for the first time today.
My fermentation was so strong that my airlock exploded.
I knew how to deal with with ... I have connect a vinyl tubing to my airlock and put the end of the tube under water.
Problem solved :)

But it got me thinking.
This is always a potential risk (airlock explosion), so should I always use setup like this up front to prevent airlock explosion.
Any thought on that ?

Thanks :)
Congratulations on your first blow off! I remember mine like it was yesterday LoL

Yes, you can set up a blowoff tube for the beginning of fermentation for all your beers if you want...nothing wrong with some precautions!

:mug:
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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@PierreLo : Welcome to HomebrewTalk.

But it got me thinking.
This is always a potential risk (airlock explosion), so should I always use setup like this up front to prevent airlock explosion.
Any thought on that ?
The risk of an airlock explosion can be mitigated by using a "large enough" fermentation vessel.

If that's not a short term option then, as @Sammy86 suggested, a blowoff tube is a time tested proven solution to the problem.
 

DBhomebrew

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Also, temperature control. Keeping the yeast on a leash will help control krausen and more importantly, yeast-derived flavor and dreaded fusel alcohols.
 

PurpleJeepXJ

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Ah I remember the early days. Fresh off the shelf extract kit and a brand new “home brewing kit” with a six gallon glass carboy. I remember thinking that I was making 5 gallon batches why would I need a 6 gallon carboy… yeah after cleaning up the walls of my apartment closet I quickly switched to a larger carboy on the next brew. The six gallon one is now only used for ciders and wine.
 

davidabcd

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As some mentioned, vessel size. I make 5 gallon batches in a 7.9 gallon fermenter. It's kept me from ever needing a blow-off tube. My main objection is losing beer ingredients and yeast.
 

MaxStout

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If you use a 3-piece airlock, remove the cap and little cup thingie. Attach some 3/8" tubing the the tube on the inside of the airlock, other end into a jar of water or Starsan. Once active fermentation slows down you can remove the tubing and reassemble the airlock.
 

brewtodrinktobrew

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My first….

I was brewing a heady topper clone, my bucket fermenters were in the kitchen. I got up the morning after pitching and there was Krausen on my ceiling, fridge and walls. Think Dumber and Dumberer scene with Bob Sagit. I cleaned up reinstalled the lid of the bucket, after a starsan bath, and left for work. Came home 10 hours later and it was a recreation of 5am in my kitchen.
The beer still turned out okay but I use a blow off tube for anything over 1.050 OG now. I swap out for a 3 piece after active fermentation is done.

Moral of the story is at least it was just an airlock not the lid blowing off under pressure.
Note there is still Krausen stains on my ceiling in the kitchen, when it went on tap it was called “Kitchen Slopper”!!!
 

oakbarn

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I have had blow outs even with head space. You never know when. I have gone to just putting foil for the first couple of days and the carboy in a pan. We have even had a Blow out with a Stainless Conical once.
 

hotbeer

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I use a 7/8 ID blow off tube now. Though I never had issues with the 3/8 ID tube on the previous batches. But I've found that even if the krausen rises in the 7/8 ID tube, it will roll back down into the fermenter. With the 3/8 tube, the krausen was blown into the catch bottle.

Had to make my own hole cutter to make a hole in a stopper that big. But if putting a hole in a stopper is an issue, then just find tubing that has an OD big enough to fit snuggly in the carboy or jugs neck.

I do sometimes switch back to a airlock after the krausen is finished.
 

pvpeacock

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The only time I have ever needed a blow off tube for my conical fermenters is when using Burton Ale yeast WLP023. Man, that stuff is a krausen machine! The first time used it, the S airlock got clogged with krausen, and the pressure inside the conical built up until the krausen started spraying out through the seal between the conical and lid. Given the lid of the SS Brewtech conical, that meant it was spraying out 360 degrees all over the walls, nearby furniture and floor. When I discovered this, I foolishly pulled out the airlock and had an instant krausen geyser that reached the ceiling. What a mess and a learning experience!
 
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