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rarcha

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I recieved a mr beer for Christmas, and in the process of pale ale, but I want to start making largerquanty of beer like Ale but prefer largers, maybe honey in it, any suggestions, I'm know dealing with a local brewing co. purhasing a larger beginers kit. well worth the money compared to others, and many recipts. this is all new to me any help would be great.
 

frazier

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OK so you have a local homebrew store (LHBS) in the area - great! Talk to them about equipment, or google austin homebrew, northern brewer, midwest, brewmasters warehouse, any of these places have equipment packages that will get you going with 5 gallon batches.

But first, pick up a book like How To Brew by Palmer, it will be a continuing source of information and guidance.

Cheers!
 

birvine

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You can actually find Palmer's book online for free. It's a good start, as well as reading a lot here on HBT.

B
 

Yooper

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You can probably do a lager in your Mr. Beer vessel pretty easily, if you can find a place that is between 48-52 degrees (most fridges are too cold).

A lager uses a strain of yeast that ferments at about 50 degrees. After fermentation the beer is cold stored ("lagered") for 6 weeks at near freezing temps (or in a fridge is fine).

An ale uses a strain of yeast that ferments at 60-72 degrees, which works well for people who have a room temperature of about 65 degrees.

If you can ferment at 50 degrees, a lager may be doable for you. But keep in mind that they require this strict temperature control, and take longer to be ready. So many people start with ales since they are easier for beginners.
 

jonmohno

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You could also pick up some s-23 dry lager yeast and ferment that around 60.
 

The_Professor

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You can probably do a lager in your Mr. Beer vessel pretty easily, if you can find a place that is between 48-52 degrees (most fridges are too cold).

A lager uses a strain of yeast that ferments at about 50 degrees. After fermentation the beer is cold stored ("lagered") for 6 weeks at near freezing temps (or in a fridge is fine).
Exactly. Temp control fermentation 48-54ish for a couple weeks, rack to secondary keg, drop temps slowly over 2-3 days, stick keg in fridge a couple weeks. Works great.
 
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rarcha

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How can I maintain 48 - 52 degress without a frige or maybe a basement that can hold that temp, in order to maker a lager, sorry comer88888, not larger, Any suggestions, Thankyou All. :mug:
 

comer88888

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What kind of beer do you like? If you let us know we could recommend some ales that are easier to brew then lagers.
 
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rarcha

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I want to attempt a honey lager or maybe an octoberfest lager. I just purchased an ale with my new beginer's kit. So thats 2 ale's fermenting. So my question is can a small fridge maintain a steady 48 to 54 degress, or will it be to cold.
 

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I want to attempt a honey lager or maybe an octoberfest lager. I just purchased an ale with my new beginer's kit. So thats 2 ale's fermenting. So my question is can a small fridge maintain a steady 48 to 54 degress, or will it be to cold.
I can't tell you if your fridge can do it or not- you'd have to put a thermometer in there with the fridge at the "highest" setting and see. Mine will not.

I am not one to be a "naysayer" but lagers are usually considered advanced brewing techniques. You can definitely try one whenever you want but it usually takes more equipment, time, better attention to processes, water with low alkalinity, and so on. Ales, especially dark ones like stouts, tend to be more forgiving.
 

The_Professor

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rarcha said:
How can I maintain 48 - 52 degress without a frige or maybe a basement that can hold that temp, in order to maker a lager,...
Of course the best way is some sort of fridge that is temp controlled, but you can use an ice chest and frozen water bottles.

When I have done that I used a thermometer to measure the ice chest temp as well as the stick on thermometer for actual keg temp.

Can't make lagers in the middle of the summer though.

Yooper said:
...I am not one to be a "naysayer" but lagers are usually considered advanced brewing techniques. You can definitely try one whenever you want but it usually takes more equipment, time, better attention to processes...
And Yooper is right, a lager is a bit more difficult than an ale.
 

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Use PacMan and ferment as cool as you can. I think PacMan will work down to about 40 F. Below 60 F it is very clean. It is an ale yeast, but will give you a pseudo lager.
 
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rarcha

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Thanks for the info, I do like stouts, Tried my first stout last night and loved it, what is the fermenting temp and timeline on a stout.
 

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Thanks for the info, I do like stouts, Tried my first stout last night and loved it, what is the fermenting temp and timeline on a stout.
Each yeast strain has an optimum range, so it really depends on the yeast strain you choose for your recipe, but in the range of 62-70 degrees is perfect for a stout. Generally, an ale will be ready to bottle in 2-3 weeks or so.
 
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