Moving hops, repurposing old site

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Genacide

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I'm looking to move my 6 year old hop plants, 7 of them to a new location. The existing location I want to repurpose and don't want any rhizomes sprouting back up after moving all the crowns. What's the best method to kill any remaining plants? I would rather not round up and plants that come up, but I don't know if I have any other options.
 

mirthfuldragon

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Good luck. Like @homebrewer_99 said, I would till it up as deep as possible to pull up all the rhizomes you can. Maybe look at herbicides but I'm not a personal fan of them. If possible, maybe plant some annuals this year, so you can keep pulling hops up as they sprout for the rest of the year.

What are you planning on putting in the bed?

To put it in perspective, I pulled up a batch of English ivy (15x15) when I bought our house five years ago, and I'm still pulling up ivy.
 

Apimyces

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What do you want to repurpose it as? Might not have to bother yourself all that much, depending on what you'll do next there.
 
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Genacide

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I plan on putting Strawberries in part of the bed and rhubarb in the other. I to have experience with Ivy and its resistance to die, even with herbicides.
 

Apimyces

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Ah, yea... were it lawn I'd have been tempted to say "just mow it". Strawberries... don't really want hops growing through it.
 

B-Hoppy

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Ivy and hops are pretty different when it comes to removing them from an area once they are established. The ivy tends to fragment MUCH more than the hops do so your potential to end up with more 'scraps' is a lot greater. With hops, the rhizomes are confined to the top 5-6 inches of the soil so if you start digging about a foot out from the center of the crown and try to dig a trench all the way around the crown, what you will generally run into is a periodic rhizome growing outward from and away from the center of the crown (see attached photo). If you planted your original rhizomes horizontally this 'spread' may be a little worse than if they were planted vertically. Once you've located one, try to undermine it out to it's termination point (they MAY grow out a few feet per year depending on your soil) and make sure to remove it all the way back to the crown. Do this all the way around each crown for best results. What you'll end up with may be a few portions of rhizomes that you missed that will start sprouting within a few weeks. Keep a good eye out and locate and dig them up, and you should be able to remove the great majority by summer. Any that you may have missed should be easy to identify and dig up next spring. Keep in mind of those you missed, they are just like newly planted rhizomes that don't have well developed root systems so they aren't that hard to remove (compared to the crown they came from).
 

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