Mounting on subway tile

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kgranger

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In the process of building out a new brewing space, floor to ceiling subway tile behind my system. Anyone have recommendations on ways to mount light-weight things to tile that could one day be removed? (really don't want to drill any holes)

Mainly want to mount clips to route my control panel cables to the wall, and a series of copper pipes along the wall for water supply to the system. Nothing should be pulling any serious weight, but I want it to be secure. I was looking at this Gorilla mounting tape, seems like it could be scraped off if I needed to disassemble. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082TQ3KB5/ref=ewc_pr_img_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
 

Ki-ri-n

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How elegant do you want it to be?
You could, just leave a tile spacer (leveling clip) in between the tiles and not break it off. Use that as a "mounting" point.
If you don't like it or want it gone later, snap it off and grout over the void.

I'm thinking something like this (there are several different types/styles) based on manufacturer:
Leveling Clip
100785757_rubi-1-32in-delta-tile-leveling-clips-200-count_1
 

Deadalus

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Copper pipe might look a little nicer but pex would be more flexible. However, why not put the water lines inside the wall since you are building it out?

You might be able to find a suitable raceway for the control panel cables. That's if you wanted something more than hooks. I just have 2 each of the heater element cords, temperature probe cable, and pump power cords, so I can't say a raceway would be super helpful. There might be some useful ideas in the home office departments. I have a zippered neoprene tube for instance on all the cables for my desktop computer which is situated on a portable desk. Keeps the cables bundled and the tubing has spaced exit holes for various peripherals.
 
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kgranger

kgranger

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However, why not put the water lines inside the wall since you are building it out?
Trying to keep the space fairly neutral with the infrastructure, just in case we end up moving and I want to convert it to a normal kitchenette. There was already a sink drain pipe, water supply for the sink, and basic outlet electrical in the walls, hoping to keep it that way and just add to it with removable things (push to connect fittings on the plumbing so I can pop it off if needed)
Only really permanent thing I'm adding is the tile, everything else can be easily removed and reverted back to how it was.

You could, just leave a tile spacer (leveling clip) in between the tiles and not break it off. Use that as a "mounting" point.
This could work, but I already have the majority of the area tiled.

Command Strips
I'll look into some of these heavier duty ones. I've used them on drywall, but not smooth tile before. I'll have to test one out to see how well it holds.
 

matt_m

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If your grout lines are big enough, only screw into the grout, touch it up later (which will work best with a dark color.) Or be sure to have enough tiles to cut out any with holes and replace in the future.
 

Deadalus

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OK, I was thinking you were building out the wall but sounds like you are already tiling anyway. Some other ways you can get them into the wall is if you have access to the attic or basement above or below the spot you want the water line. You could run the line over and then down or up into the bay between the studs. I'm not sure you will be able to mount a valve too firmly without screwing into the wall. Like matt_m suggests, keep a few extra tiles. Copper and pex have specific spacing intervals for strapping. Your pipes will vibrate with pressure changes. I think command strips can hold the weight but I unsure about the vibration. Coming up through the floor or ceiling you could strap the pipes a little better, even if outside the wall.

Another place to run lines is at the baseboard. You can make holes all you want low and then put the baseboard back on.

Sometimes if you need to work or run pipes behind a tile wall you can work from the backside as well.
 
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kgranger

kgranger

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Your pipes will vibrate with pressure changes. I think command strips can hold the weight but I unsure about the vibration.
Good call on this, I didn't consider the vibration.

I guess a little description of the space might help. Don't have any pics on hand but I can get these later. It's up against a basement exterior wall, so getting behind it isnt an option unfortunately. Not much access above it either, pretty tight space, so anything behind the wall is probably not going to happen. The ceiling is unfinished so the joists are exposed. I'm thinking maybe this could be a place I could anchor the pipe to, just run it up the wall, and elbow it to run across the joists. I don't mind if it is all exposed really.

It would be cool if I could find some sort of supply hose that I could attach to the outlet of the pipe that could pull down to fill a kettle, then spring back up so it is out of the way. Have you seen anything like this? Kind of like a commercial dishwashing sink faucet but more compact and easily attached to a 1/2" fitting.
 
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kgranger

kgranger

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Do you have a sink near by?
Are you using "house" supply water for just cleaning and stuff or for your brewing water as well?
Yup, sink to the left of the system. It's fed by house water supply right underneath it, and I am tee-ing off the cold water pipe to run the new pipe to be used for brewing (will have a few tee's off this new pipe going to the kettle for filling, to my CFC and to my steam condenser)

I know I could just run a hose from an attachment on the sink's faucet to do all these things, I just want to engineer a bit more ease in my brew day with hard plumbing ready to go.
 

Ki-ri-n

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I used this sink faucet in my brew area:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08R79593H/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It has a "commercial" style pull down faucet (doesn't really have a whole lot of articulation) and a single spout. I attached a garden adapter to the spout. So I can "add" whatever hose/connection I need on a temporary basis. I can add an extended hose to use for cleaning. Or primarily, I use it for running cold water thru my CFC.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08TGQQ9H2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

733091-20221011-052955.jpg
 
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Orangecrusher

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Perhaps you could fabricate a temporary frame made out of your favorite material. I like metal but most people feel more comfortable with wood. You could make it span the distance between the floor and ceiling and as wide as you need. If you attach something soft to the top like truck camper foam and have adjustable feet along the bottom under each upright, you should be able to make a rigid firm "chassis" onto which you can make attachments for all your doodads. With this design you won't have to mark any surfaces in the room at all. When you want to take it down you just turn the feet with a wrench and presto, kitchenette. Obviously, if you want to hang things that may try to pull the structure down you could add a foot perpendicular to the frame at the bottom somewhere where it's not in the way and outward enough to stabilize the wall. Put an adjustable foot on that too so you can tweak it. For your application you could probably just use dimensional lumber and it wouldn't even need to be 2x4. 1x3 might be fine. Put them where you need them or make a design. You could even use it as light shelving for small light stuff like spices.

You could use nice wood and stain it and make it look nice.
 

Deadalus

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Good call on this, I didn't consider the vibration.

I guess a little description of the space might help. Don't have any pics on hand but I can get these later. It's up against a basement exterior wall, so getting behind it isnt an option unfortunately. Not much access above it either, pretty tight space, so anything behind the wall is probably not going to happen. The ceiling is unfinished so the joists are exposed. I'm thinking maybe this could be a place I could anchor the pipe to, just run it up the wall, and elbow it to run across the joists. I don't mind if it is all exposed really.

It would be cool if I could find some sort of supply hose that I could attach to the outlet of the pipe that could pull down to fill a kettle, then spring back up so it is out of the way. Have you seen anything like this? Kind of like a commercial dishwashing sink faucet but more compact and easily attached to a 1/2" fitting.
Across the joists would work and then down should be reasonably solid with copper. I'd put a cross piece between the joists at the elbow or maybe put the elbow right at a joist. Or you could mount the valve at the end and have some sort of short hose come down and tuck it back up in the joist. Depends on the room height and your height maybe. I have a sprayer sink like the one pictured but those sprayers rely on a weight usually to pull the hose back inside the housing. The commercial ones I've used are more of a spring and the hose and spring bend together.
 

Orangecrusher

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It would be cool if I could find some sort of supply hose that I could attach to the outlet of the pipe that could pull down to fill a kettle, then spring back up so it is out of the way. Have you seen anything like this? Kind of like a commercial dishwashing sink faucet but more compact and easily attached to a 1/2" fitting.
Air hose reel. Run water through it instead. Just use some food grade hose.
 

Boilinginsc

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You could leave single tiles out where you plan to strap, then if you have to take it out just a matter of setting in a tile over the strap support anchor and a little grout
 
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