Mountain Style IPA

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pvtpublic

Whale Oil Beef Hooked
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I'm not much of a hophead, but this whole "Mountain Style IPA" thing is getting me back into hops again. Color me nostalgic. What is your experience with them with commercial beers or homebrew renditions? I decided to take a crack at making a recipe entirely from scratch since I struggled to find a lot of info on brewing one. It turned out well, in fact one of my favorite recipes. I'll share mine if you share yours.

OG 1060
Ca 135 Na 33 Cl 57 Mg 11 Sulfate 302 Bicarb 108
Pale 33%
Pils 33%
Vienna 13%
Wheat 13%
C30 5%
Dex 2%
Mash 152*F
Cascade 8 IBU @30min
Centennial 25 IBU @15min
BRU-1 8 IBU @WP
Sabro 8 IBU @WP
Centennial 10 IBU @WP
Ferment @68*F 3 weeks, keg/bottle
Dry hop BRU-1, Sabro, and Citra to the max.
Use your favorite hazy yeast.
This thing peaks right after the suntan lotion flavor of Sabro drops out, and the whirlpool smells incredible.
 
I cannot remember if I found this one here or not, but it turned out very well. I will say I had some problems with the mash temp as I kept reading it wrong, but it seems to have worked out ok. I am not sure it is a Mountain IPA as your grain bill looks very different, but when I found it, that is what it was labeled.

https://share.brewfather.app/Tg49h6TXdRgmZd

I am going to try it again though and be a bit better on the process.

Edit, I went looking and I think this is the thread and recipe I started with.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/help-finding-“mountain-ipa”.731508/
 
Last edited:
What is a mountain IPA?
It's a mix between west coast and east coast (neipa/hazy) IPAs. Some good examples would be Mountain Standard by Odells, Mountain Jam by Roadhouse, and Steep Coast by Oskar Blues.

It's a style that's kind of a fledgling. I'd like to see it gain some momentum, especially since people consider sour hazies worthy of inserting into their mouths. 🤮
So, if I was to break it down BJCP-ish style, I would say that aromas and flavors should be of pine, citrus, and tropical fruit. Strong bitterness like a Westy has, but slammed with whirlpool and dry hops. It should also have a super hazy appearance. Malt character should be more prominent than a hazy, but not as balancing as a Westy. It should use a combination of a west and an east malt bill, similar to what I posted.

The particular recipe I shared combines a piña colada flavor with that of a pine forest. It seems strange to fathom, but its one of my favorite smelling beers on brew day.
 
As the starter of the thread that was linked above I can tell you this is a very hard beer to track down. I did so many hours of research trying all the keywords and what I got is basically contained in that thread. One video from YouTube. I made that beer but with hops to match Mountain Standard and it was good but not exactly what I was looking for. You get plenty of google results for commercial examples but absolutely no recipes.

I emailed Odell's and asked very specific questions. The brewer wasn't helpful at all. I wasn't expecting a copy and paste of the recipe but at least guidance. He spent two paragraphs just to say, "grain bill is a hybrid of the styles, and we like citrus hops".

I've mostly given up now but come back to it now and again. My next step was to email Liquid Mechanics since they have a"both coast ipa". Hopefully they will be more helpful. Or maybe when I have more time in the fall I will just come up with my own. I do most brew experiments in the winter anyway. That's why I started with this back in Nov/Dec I think.
 
I’m in Missouri and have seen a few beers from local breweries that use this description but are calling them ‘Midwest Coast IPA,’ Piney River Brewing peaks at the top of my head atm.
 
The bite works really well with the juiciness of the hops. Granted, the bitterness of mine is more pronounced than the others I listed on the market.

As the starter of the thread that was linked above I can tell you this is a very hard beer to track down. I did so many hours of research trying all the keywords and what I got is basically contained in that thread. One video from YouTube
That's exactly what I ran into. I took a shot in the dark at a recipe and it turned out great, hence why I've shared it.

I’m in Missouri and have seen a few beers from local breweries that use this description but are calling them ‘Midwest Coast IPA,’ Piney River Brewing peaks at the top of my head atm.
I've noticed breweries have been making up their own terms for it, but it's a style that's starting to develop into its own.

I cannot remember if I found this one here or not, but it turned out very well. I will say I had some problems with the mash temp as I kept reading it wrong, but it seems to have worked out ok. I am not sure it is a Mountain IPA as your grain bill looks very different, but when I found it, that is what it was labeled.

https://share.brewfather.app/Tg49h6TXdRgmZd

I am going to try it again though and be a bit better on the process.

Edit, I went looking and I think this is the thread and recipe I started with.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/help-finding-“mountain-ipa”.731508/


I had never heard of it either and really don't know whether what I did qualifies, but it was good stuff.
This definitely looks right. The very few recipes, or fragment thereof, that I have been able to procure list some combo of strata, cashmere, and/or sabro. I personally get a Pina colada thing going on with the combination of strata and BRU-1. It also produces a perception of sweetness (almost all of my beers usually finish at 1010 or lower)
 
This is a logical trajectory for the style. The IBU Wars eventually came to an end and now with Hazies there’s only so murky you can make it or only so many dry hops you can add. Eventually the one-upping stops and the “here’s a beer that’s similar but possibly better” begins. Like a lot of others I think this style would suit my preferences. I like hop forward IPAs but I also like a certain amount of bitterness as a minimum and no lactose or ridiculously thick body. I have also seen a couple “Midwest IPAs”. Will have to keep my eye out for more examples and maybe brew one if my own. The IPA I’ve been brewing for 8 years almost fits the bill. Firm but not obscene bitterness plus tons of post boil Amarillo and Galaxy.
 
This is a logical trajectory for the style. The IBU Wars eventually came to an end and now with Hazies there’s only so murky you can make it or only so many dry hops you can add. Eventually the one-upping stops and the “here’s a beer that’s similar but possibly better” begins. Like a lot of others I think this style would suit my preferences. I like hop forward IPAs but I also like a certain amount of bitterness as a minimum and no lactose or ridiculously thick body. I have also seen a couple “Midwest IPAs”. Will have to keep my eye out for more examples and maybe brew one if my own. The IPA I’ve been brewing for 8 years almost fits the bill. Firm but not obscene bitterness plus tons of post boil Amarillo and Galaxy.
Would love to see your recipe. Can't say I have used Galaxy yet.
 
The "Mountain IPA" trend has been really interesting to me, in that it's basically as rehashing of "early" NEIPAS from circa 2012-14. So fairly high bitterness, lower FG than many modern NEIPAs, often fermented with a Chico style strain but very heavily whirlpool and dry hopped with modern US hops.

I've made something fairly similar recently combining a WCIPA grist and hot-side hopping with English yeast and NEIPA post-flameout hopping. Amarillo, Centennial and Citra Cryo hotside, and Amarillo, Citra Cryo and Strata coldside. 65 IBU. 85% Pilsner, 10% Munich I and 5% Crystal T50, and it bangs pretty hard.
 
The "Mountain IPA" trend has been really interesting to me, in that it's basically as rehashing of "early" NEIPAS from circa 2012-14. So fairly high bitterness, lower FG than many modern NEIPAs, often fermented with a Chico style strain but very heavily whirlpool and dry hopped with modern US hops.

I've made something fairly similar recently combining a WCIPA grist and hot-side hopping with English yeast and NEIPA post-flameout hopping. Amarillo, Centennial and Citra Cryo hotside, and Amarillo, Citra Cryo and Strata coldside. 65 IBU. 85% Pilsner, 10% Munich I and 5% Crystal T50, and it bangs pretty hard.
Posting my recipe for those who were interested, but yes I agree HM-2. It's a more bitter hazy-ish IPA. I don't adjust my water to have a super high chloride:sulfate ratio (but I also don't go the other direction either, its pretty balanced).

Batch Size: 5.5gal
OG: 1.064 FG: 1.013 ABV: 6.7%
Color: 6.2 SRM
IBU: 61 BU/GU Ratio: 0.953

77% US 2-Row
23% Munich 10L

Single infusion @ 150f for 60 min., mash out, batch sparge

0.66oz Simcoe @ 60 (38 IBU)
1.5oz Simcoe @ 15 (23 IBU)
2 oz ea. Amarillo & Galaxy @ 0
2 oz. each Amarillo, Galaxy, & Simcoe DH

1318 fermented @ 65F ramping up to 68F as end of fermentation is complete
 
I don't adjust my water to have a super high chloride:sulfate ratio (but I also don't go the other direction either, its pretty balanced).

I might have to pilot a batch with a balanced profile. Do you find yours to be 'juicy' like a NEIPA?
 

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