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Molson-Coors introduces "Microcarbonation"

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khiddy

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I see on the press release wire that Molson Coors is introducing a new line of beer ("Molson M") that claims to be "microcarbinated"

Microcarbonization is a revolutionary process implemened by Molson Coors at the company's brewery on Notre-Dame Street in Montreal, a process during which the beer is injected with CO2 through smaller, finer bubbles with a high level of precision and consistency.
"The injection of smaller CO2 bubbles makes it possible to preserve not only the taste of the hops but also the delicate flavours generated by the yeast during fermentation," explained Karine Brunelle, brewer with Molson Coors.
So, they were able to head down to their LHBS and buy a 2 micron stone and hook it up to a CO2 tank, eh?

Full press release: http://www.benzinga.com/press-relea...s-m-the-world-s-only-microcarbonated-tm-lager
 

MBasile

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First person that asks me if my beer is microcarbonated is not going to be happy...
 

jescholler

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Interesting. I'm surprised they didn't go for the nanocarbonation. I'm curious to know how different it feels.
 

Edcculus

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I don't get it...is it going to have less carbonation? Carbonation is carbonation right? When I force carb a keg, I hook it up to pressure. The CO2 slowly dissolves into the liquid. With that method, I'm not even bubbling CO2 through the beer. When you bottle condition, yeast put out small amounts of CO2. My guess, much smaller than a 2 micron stone. That ****s happening on a molecular level!

My guess is that Molson figured out they could carbonate faster and more precisely by this "method" and decided they could market it. Mega breweries marketing schemes remind me more and more of this commercial:

 
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Damnit, I just bought tires for my truck. The guy mentioned nothing about death crystals. I bet my tires are full of them!

I can't wait till next year when they come out with their FoamFluf Carbonation Procedure. NEver mind that widget in your can, this is a new innovative process.
 

Bobby_M

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Wow, this is way worse than triple hops brewed and frost brewed. You notice how all the total bull**** marketing terms have to be trademarked?

My new company is going to sell Aqua-infused(tm), Alphabetamashed(tm), Wortboiled(tm), Multihops Brewed(tm), Saccharomented(tm), Lageriffic(tm) beer.
 
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This is just a ploy to get the word, "Micro" on all of their ad copy.

A savvy competitor will now have to work, "Craft" into their stuff.

I suggest, "Craft Forklifted Pallets".
 

remilard

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Every once in a while these BS marketing terms describe actual valuable brewing techniques (although they never explain their actual value) eg beechwood aged and "ice" beer.
 

Edcculus

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Every once in a while these BS marketing terms describe actual valuable brewing techniques (although they never explain their actual value) eg beechwood aged and "ice" beer.
Except Budweiser's commercials insinuate that aging the beer on beechwood somehow imparts a flavor to the beer. In reality, they use beechwood because of the lack of flavor it imparts. I still call BS on that one too.
 

silverbrewer

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Are you guys talking about something force carbonated with nitrogen? We have that crap over here, "Bodingtons smoothflow" and the like....
It does give the beer tiny bubbles and a smooth feel and given that there are no stiking tastes to linger on, or any hops to speak of, you drink it twice as fast, which makes more profit!!!

It works well in Guinness though, who I think started it, although someone will put me right if someone beat them to it!
 

remilard

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Except Budweiser's commercials insinuate that aging the beer on beechwood somehow imparts a flavor to the beer. In reality, they use beechwood because of the lack of flavor it imparts. I still call BS on that one too.
I'm not actually sure that they do imply that. I don't think most people think that Budweiser tastes like wood.

Either way, it is a technique that not all lager brewers use and it materially affects the beer.
 

Edcculus

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True. I just get that impression from their commercials. Someone not familiar with brewing might think they are using it to flavor. I actually think I heard a friend say they could taste the beechwood one time too.
 

Edcculus

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Are you guys talking about something force carbonated with nitrogen? We have that crap over here, "Bodingtons smoothflow" and the like....
It does give the beer tiny bubbles and a smooth feel and given that there are no stiking tastes to linger on, or any hops to speak of, you drink it twice as fast, which makes more profit!!!

It works well in Guinness though, who I think started it, although someone will put me right if someone beat them to it!
I'm pretty sure they are talking about something completely different. Molson would taste like absolute crap on nitrogen, ie very low carbonation.
 
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khiddy

khiddy

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Technically, if you use Nitrogen, you're not "carbon-ating" at all, are you?

You're "nitr-ating" the beer...

Which makes me think... I could advertise my carbonated beer as "Nitrate free"!

(BTW, I know that Beer Gas is a blend, but I just think it important to point out that to carbonate requires the use of carbon... as in CO2.)
 

MBasile

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At least you can tell them it's triple hops brewed (maybe even more). :D
Whenever I see that one I yell at the TV "My last IPA was quadruple hops brewed!!!!" :tank:

I don't get it...is it going to have less carbonation? Carbonation is carbonation right? When I force carb a keg, I hook it up to pressure. The CO2 slowly dissolves into the liquid. With that method, I'm not even bubbling CO2 through the beer. When you bottle condition, yeast put out small amounts of CO2. My guess, much smaller than a 2 micron stone. That ****s happening on a molecular level!

My guess is that Molson figured out they could carbonate faster and more precisely by this "method" and decided they could market it. Mega breweries marketing schemes remind me more and more of this commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzTXxZ3sNUI&feature=player_embedded
This is all information that the average consumer does not know, therefore they assume that it's good/new.
 
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