British Golden Ale Miraculix Best - Classic English Ale

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

thehaze

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2017
Messages
2,197
Reaction score
990
Location
Iasi, Romania
z-bob S-33 is actually a fine yeast - just adjust your expections in terms of attenuation, flocculation and intensity of esters. It can attenuate high if you treat it right, it can settle to the bottom of the bottle/keg, if you give it time and use restraint *if dry hopping and it does have a pleasent ester profile - it's just not as proeminent as let's say the Verdant yeast. I have found it to possibly be sensitive to hop creep - it did happen for me to get 81% attenuation with S-33 with a Pale Ale that was dry hopped with 170 gr / 6 oz hops. I mashed it low at around 64-65C/147-149F and there was only Pilsner malt in the grainbill. Other than that, it works well in any style of " ale ".
 
OP
Miraculix

Miraculix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
4,954
Reaction score
3,355
Location
Bremen
I just finished rereading the whole thread again, for inspiration. My last English-ish beer was a clown beer; the typical American problem of too much of everything :) Too much alcohol, too much crystal malt, too much dark invert. It was hard to drink unless I either drank it ice cold or mixed it with a light lager to dilute it (then it was actually pretty good, but probably still wrong)

Anyway. How would the original recipe be with S-33 yeast? (I know Pub yeast is the essential ingredient, so it won't be the same beer) I just found a stash of yeast packets and there were 5 or 6 packets of S-33 in there. Since they are a couple of years old, I'll use Go-Ferm to rehydrate. I think S-33 is the old Edme strain, and even tho' they call it "Belgian" it's actually a close cousin of Windsor ale yeast. And I'll try to get the right crystal malt instead of substituting the right color American crystal.
I guess it will be ok. Never used it myself, but for what I've read about it, it should work ok-ish. If I would need to choose a dry yeast, I would go for verdant IPA for this.
 

ba-brewer

I'm not Zog
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 12, 2014
Messages
12,180
Reaction score
6,043
Location
sf Bay Area
After seeing the post about a "Belgian" yeast I figure I should post about my golden syrup vs corn sugar experiment. My experiment was a bust as my English ale immigrated to Belgium sometime after packaging. First I thought it was only the corn sugar half then the golden syrup started showing a phenolic flavor and aroma. Although not the expected flavor profile it was still a nice beer and did not dump it.

I will rebrew this beer again but without experimenting and hopefully without getting it contaminated.

The pictures are from a couple PET bottles I used to test carbonation progression.
IMG_2992 - Copy.JPG

IMG_2993 - Copy.JPG
 
OP
Miraculix

Miraculix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
4,954
Reaction score
3,355
Location
Bremen
After seeing the post about a "Belgian" yeast I figure I should post about my golden syrup vs corn sugar experiment. My experiment was a bust as my English ale immigrated to Belgium sometime after packaging. First I thought it was only the corn sugar half then the golden syrup started showing a phenolic flavor and aroma. Although not the expected flavor profile it was still a nice beer and did not dump it.

I will rebrew this beer again but without experimenting and hopefully without getting it contaminated.

The pictures are from a couple PET bottles I used to test carbonation progression.
View attachment 745882
View attachment 745883
How unfortunate. Would have been nice to see the difference between these two sugars :(
 

kmarkstevens

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2017
Messages
774
Reaction score
905
After seeing the post about a "Belgian" yeast I figure I should post about my golden syrup vs corn sugar experiment. My experiment was a bust as my English ale immigrated to Belgium sometime after packaging. First I thought it was only the corn sugar half then the golden syrup started showing a phenolic flavor and aroma. Although not the expected flavor profile it was still a nice beer and did not dump it.
bwahahahahaha. I feel your pain. I've learned my lesson about being lazy with sanitizing the siphon on siphonless fermenters. They, too, often decided to immigrate to Brussels.
 
OP
Miraculix

Miraculix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
4,954
Reaction score
3,355
Location
Bremen
bwahahahahaha. I feel your pain. I've learned my lesson about being lazy with sanitizing the siphon on siphonless fermenters. They, too, often decided to immigrate to Brussels.
We've all been there :D
 

Northern_Brewer

British - apparently some US company stole my name
Joined
Aug 16, 2017
Messages
3,389
Reaction score
2,812
Location
UK
How would the original recipe be with S-33 yeast? (I know Pub yeast is the essential ingredient, so it won't be the same beer) I just found a stash of yeast packets and there were 5 or 6 packets of S-33 in there. Since they are a couple of years old, I'll use Go-Ferm to rehydrate. I think S-33 is the old Edme strain, and even tho' they call it "Belgian" it's actually a close cousin of Windsor ale yeast.
I guess it will be ok. Never used it myself, but for what I've read about it, it should work ok-ish. If I would need to choose a dry yeast, I would go for verdant IPA for this.
I'd tend to agree with Miraculix on this one, at least based on my experience of Windsor. Which is OK, fine for weekday drinking, but probably not what I'd use if I was out to impress. And FWIW, Windsor drops well but doesn't flocculate, so you just need to be careful when dispensing it, I assume S-33 is similar.
 

kmarkstevens

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2017
Messages
774
Reaction score
905
I have "heard" that a lot of English breweries pitch some Nottingham late in the fermentation to hit FG and to flocculate out the yeast. I have also "heard" that English breweries tend to use clarity ferm as well to clear the beer (and make reduced gluten).

My palate is not a fan of Windsor, but Notty is definitely a top contender for my "if I could only brew with one yeast for the rest of my life" yeast.

That said, what the hell, why not use up some old yeast and see what it tastes like? I've done less well thought out things before. ;)
 

Northern_Brewer

British - apparently some US company stole my name
Joined
Aug 16, 2017
Messages
3,389
Reaction score
2,812
Location
UK
I have "heard" that a lot of English breweries pitch some Nottingham late in the fermentation to hit FG and to flocculate out the yeast. I have also "heard" that English breweries tend to use clarity ferm as well to clear the beer (and make reduced gluten).
I'm not sure it's "a lot", but it certainly happens.

Notty is one of those love/hate yeasts, some people seem to really not get on with it.
 
OP
Miraculix

Miraculix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
4,954
Reaction score
3,355
Location
Bremen
I like it for clean beers, but it really steals hop flavour. I made comparisons and everything I used it in had remarkably less dry hop/late addition hop flavour and aroma than for example us05 beers. So at long as it's not a really hoppy beer, I like it.
 
Top