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Schwabeer

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So, I have a friend who's got a MegaPot 1.2 10 gal system for sale brand new. I could probably get a deal on it, but I'm wondering if it'll work for me? I currently brew one pot, on the stove batches. But I'd like to go into All Grain.
I know just because it's available, doesn't mean it's the right setup for me. I could probably get it for $430? But are there better options? I'm definetly into high gravity 10%+ kind of beers. I haven't done over 5 gal finished batches, but I wouldn't be opposed. My goal is probably soda kegs, and doing experimental batches. Even though, I only have bottled. Kegging and all grain is the next obvious step. What are your thoughts or recommendations? Thanks in advance
 

3 Dawg Night

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I use a 10-gallon Spike kettle for 5-gallon batches, and it works fine. I haven't had any boilovers. The kettle is not the concern with all-grain; if you want to be able to do high-gravity beers, you need to make sure the mash-lauter tun (MLT) is large enough to handle 20+ lb of grain. I haven't done any high-gravity beers yet, so someone with more experience in that realm will have to chime in on MLT sizing. I have a 10-gallon MLT, but the largest grain bill I've done so far has been 14.25 lb for a 7% ABV IPA. I'd guess there was probably room for 20 lb + water (but I'm just guessing).

What else (e.g., MLT, burner, fermenters) is he selling with that kettle? A 10-gallon MegaPot 1.2 is only ~$200 brand new.
 

IslandLizard

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You definitely don't need 2 10-gallon kettles, if that's what "the system" is you're eyeing up buying from your friend.

One 10 gallon kettle is plenty large for boiling 5-6 gallon brews. Mash in a converted cooler, and batch sparge.

Now if you want to do full volume BIAB, which is the acronym for "Brew in a Bag," (with no sparges or very minimal ones), you'd need a 15 gallon kettle for 5-6 gallon batches, as the kettle has to hold ALL the water and grain for your batch.

How are you going to heat your kettle? Brewing indoors or outdoors?
 
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Schwabeer

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Probably outdoors. To me that would make the most sense.
 
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I use a 10-gallon Spike kettle for 5-gallon batches, and it works fine. I haven't had any boilovers. The kettle is not the concern with all-grain; if you want to be able to do high-gravity beers, you need to make sure the mash-lauter tun (MLT) is large enough to handle 20+ lb of grain. I haven't done any high-gravity beers yet, so someone with more experience in that realm will have to chime in on MLT sizing. I have a 10-gallon MLT, but the largest grain bill I've done so far has been 14.25 lb for a 7% ABV IPA. I'd guess there was probably room for 20 lb + water (but I'm just guessing).

What else (e.g., MLT, burner, fermenters) is he selling with that kettle? A 10-gallon MegaPot 1.2 is only ~$200 brand new.
I just think he’s selling whatever is in with that kit from Northern Brewer. Along with glass carboys and the generic homebrew stuff. Nothing special, but that stuff I already have.
 
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Or would I be better off with an all-in-one system? Some of those systems do look cool, and the prices have been dropping... I know I should also get into kegging. Bottling sucks.
 
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If I were starting over, I would definitely give the Anvil Foundry a strong look.
Yeah that’s the one I was looking at. It looks simple and legit and perfect for what I’d like to do. Unless anyone has a different opinion I might save up for a couple checks and make it happen.
 

bwible

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Yeah that’s the one I was looking at. It looks simple and legit and perfect for what I’d like to do. Unless anyone has a different opinion I might save up for a couple checks and make it happen.
You’re not going to do any high gravity 10+% beers with an Anvil Foundry unless you plan on adding extract. Check out the grain capacity. I have the 6.5, grain capacity is about 8lbs. The 10.5 says it has a 16 lb grain capacity
 

3 Dawg Night

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You’re not going to do any high gravity 10+% beers with an Anvil Foundry unless you plan on adding extract. Check out the grain capacity. I have the 6.5, grain capacity is about 8lbs. The 10.5 says it has a 16 lb grain capacity
Oh, I forgot the OP was interested in high gravity. Good catch!
 

bwible

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Oh, I forgot the OP was interested in high gravity. Good catch!
I heard they do make an adapter for the 10.5 that would let you do smaller batches with it. I think its discussed in another thread. You could probably use the 10.5 to brew higher gravity 3 gallon batches or something. Read what others said about it, how well it works, etc
 
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Ok so back to the drawing board? I definitely want a system where I can do high gravity. Like, high high gravity if needed..🤣
 

IslandLizard

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Ok so back to the drawing board? I definitely want a system where I can do high gravity. Like, high high gravity if needed..🤣
I see 2 viable options:
  1. Stick with a 10 gallon kettle and a large enough converted cooler as mash tun. For example, my 54 quart (13.5 gallon) rectangular cooler mash tun can very comfortably accommodate the grist and mash water for a 5.5-6 gallon 1.100 batch at 1.5 quarts per pound of grain. Omit the (batch) sparge or do it once with a small amount (for higher gravity) or twice (for longer boil). I never went higher than 1.100, but there was space left for more. If you need much higher gravity, get a larger cooler or mash twice.
  2. Get a brewing urn (such as the Foundry) for your regular gravity batches (say up to 1.070-1.080) and use it to boil high gravity batches, but mashed in a separate, converted cooler. In 2013 the Coleman Xtreme cooler cost me $22 (good old Sears) plus $15 in parts and a few hours of labor.

Manifold shown upside down for the picture. ;)

CPVC Manifold_1200.jpg
 
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