mashing temp and time

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delboy

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Hi
I know that the time and temp of the mash affects the malt profile etc so different styles require different conditions. Having said i was wondering what peoples work horse temp and time is for say their tried and tested 'on tap' house beers.
Im only starting out on AG so im trying to play it safe using temp 151F/66C
for 90 mins.
I'd be intereseted to hear what other peoples standard mash temp/time is.
 

zoebisch01

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Well, I think you hit the nail on the head in that the mash profile will affect the finished product so I don't necessarily think there is a standard temp. Now that being said, I am sure you could get away with always using the same temp, then I would shoot for 153° F or so (which is also the cited target as the 'workhorse'). The band of the standardized 'mash target' is really a compromise between optimal Alpa and Beta Amylase working temperatures. In reality I am not certain how much a change of a degree or two affects the final product, and this is most likely recipe dependent as well, I am guessing. Now some people say Iodine is a waste of time, but to share from personal experience I have had conversion in about a half hour with high diastatic malts. Recently though, on my first Wheat recipe, I checked several times and didn't have conversion for a full hour and a half. So temperature and time are going to vary quite significantly for some recipes. I would tend to think your 90 minutes would be a little long for many recipes, which is why I would recommend some Iodine on hand for checking.

Oh, PS I like your Avatar :D
 

cweston

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I agree with zoebisch01--I'm generally concerned with my beers finishing with a high enough FG, not too high. I'd say most of my beers are mashed in single infusions at 152 or 153. Lower for very specific styles, like a wit.

I recently did an IPA that finished a little drier than I wanted. I mashed at 153, but it was very cold out and I probably lost more heat than usual in the mashtun. I brewed in the same conditions a week later, but brought the mashtun inside during the rest. That beer finished with something closer to the target FG.
 

perry

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delboy. I mash nearly everything at 151 for 90 minutes. I usually lose two or three degrees during that time. I like drier beers, so these temps work for me.

cheers, -p
 

ayrton

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I did one all-grain recipe, and I aimed for 153. I managed to hit it, but at the end of 60 minutes, it was around 150. I need to work on keeping the temperature a little more stable.
 

Dr Malt

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With all the variables in mashing, homebrewer to homebrewer, I would echo the words of zoebisch01 and recommend the use of iodine for conversion until you are familiar with your particular mash process and system. Besides times and temperatures there are variables in equipment, rate of heat loss, rate of heating, mixing, temperature uniformity, amount of water per pound of malt, malt enzymes, recipes, etc. For example, on my brew set up, I see conversion times on a simple one step infusion mash vary from 20 minutes to 60 minutes at 152 F recipe to recipe.

Just my 2 cents.

Dr Malt:)
 
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